Storytelling
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Storytelling. Little Red Riding Hood. Once upon a time . . . in the middle of a thick forest there was a small cottage, the home of a pretty little girl; Little Red Riding Hood. One day, her Mommy waved goodbye at the garden gate, saying:

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Storytelling

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Storytelling

Storytelling


Little red riding hood

Little Red Riding Hood

  • Once upon a time . . . in the middle of a thick forest there was a smallcottage, the home of a pretty little girl; Little RedRiding Hood. One day, her Mommy waved goodbye at the garden gate, saying:

  • "Grandma is ill. Take her this basket of cakes, but be careful. Keep tothe path through the wood and don't stop. That way, you will be happy."


Little red riding hood1

Little Red Riding Hood

Little Red Riding Hood kissed her mother and ran off. "Don't worry,' shesaid, "I'll run all the way to Grandma's without stopping."

   Happily, the little girl made her way through the wood, butshe soon forgot her mother's wise words. "What lovely strawberries! Andso red . . ."

   Putting her basket on the ground, Little Red Riding Hood looked at thestrawberry plants. "They're nice and red, and so big! Yummy! Delicious! Justanother one. And one more. This is the last . . . Well, this one . . . Mmmm."   The red fruit was in the leaves in the grass, andLittle Red Riding Hood ran back and forth putting strawberries into her mouth.


Storytelling

Suddenly she remembered her mother, her promise, Grandma and the basket . . .and hurried back to the path. The basket was still in the grass and,humming to herself, Little Red Riding Hood walked on.

The wood became thicker and thicker. Suddenly a yellow butterfly came down through the trees. Little Red Riding Hood started to chase the butterfly.

"I'll catch you! I'll catch you!" she called. Suddenly she saw some largedaisies in the grass.

  "Oh, how sweet!" she exclaimed and, thinking of Grandma, she picked a largebunch of flowers.

In the meantime, two wicked eyes were spying on her from behind a tree . .a strange rustling in the woods made Little Red Riding Hood's heart thump.

Now quite afraid she said to herself. "I must find the path and run awayfrom here!"

At last she came to the path again but her heart went into her mouth at the sound of a gruff voice which said: "Where ' . . are you going, my prettygirl, all alone in the woods?"


Storytelling

"I'm taking Grandma some cakes. She lives at the end of the path," saidLittle Riding Hood in a faint voice.

   When he heard this, the wolf (for it was the big bad wolf himself) politelyasked: "Does Grandma live by herself?"

   "Oh, yes," replied Little Red Riding Hood, "and she never opens the door tostrangers!"

   "Goodbye. Perhaps we'll meet again," replied the wolf. Then he went awaythinking to himself "I'll eat the grandmother first, then wait forthe grandchild!" At last, he saw the the cottage .


Storytelling

  • Knock! Knock! The wolfrapped on the door.

  •   "Who's there?" cried Grandma from her bed.

  •    "It's me, Little Red Riding Hood. I've brought you some cakes becauseyou're ill," said the wolf, trying hard to hide his gruff voice.

  •    "Lift the latch and come in," said Grandma, unaware of anything amiss, tilla horrible shadow appeared on the wall. Poor Grandma! For in one jump, thewolf leapt across the room and, in a single mouthful, swallowed the old lady.

  • Soon after, Little Red Riding Hood tapped on the door.


Storytelling

  • "Grandma, can I come in?" she called.

  •    Now, the wolf had put on the old lady's shawl and cap and slipped into thebed. Trying to imitate Grandma's quavering little voice, he replied: "Open the latch and come in!"

  •    "What a deep voice you have," said the little girl in surprise.

  •    "The better to greet you with," said the wolf.

  •    "Goodness, what big eyes you have."

  •    "The better to see you with."


Storytelling

  • "And what big hands you have!" exclaimed Little Red Riding Hood, steppingover to the bed.

  •    "The better to hug you with," said the wolf.

  •    "What a big mouth you have," the little girl murmured in a weak voice.

  •    "The better to eat you with!" growled the wolf, and jumping out of bed, heswallowed her up too.


Storytelling

  • Then, with a fat full tummy, he fell fast asleep.


Storytelling

  •   In the meantime, a hunter had emerged from the wood, and on noticing thecottage, he decided to stop and ask for a drink. He had spent a lot of timetrying to catch a large wolf that had been terrorizing the neighborhood, buthad lost its tracks. The hunter could hear a strange whistling sound; itseemed to be coming from inside the cottage. He looked through the window ...and saw the large wolf himself, with a fat full tummy, snoring away inGrandma's bed.

  •    "The wolf! He won't get away this time!"


Storytelling

  • Without making a sound, the hunter carefully loaded his gun and gentlyopened the window. He pointed the barrel straight at the wolf's head and . . .BANG! The wolf was dead.

  •    "Got you at last!" shouted the hunter in glee. "You'll never frightenanyone again.

  •    He cut open the wolf's stomach and to his amazement, out popped Grandma andLittle Red Riding Hood, safe and unharmed.


Storytelling

  • "You arrived just in time," murmured the old lady, quite overcome by allthe excitement.

  •    "It's safe to go home now," the hunter told Little Red Riding Hood. "Thebig bad wolf is dead and gone, and there is no danger on the path."

  •    Still scared, the little girl hugged her grandmother. "Oh, what a horriblefright!"


Storytelling

  •   Much later, as dusk was falling, Little Red Riding Hood's mother arrived,all out of breath, worried because her llttle girl had not come home. And whenshe saw Little Red Riding Hood, safe and sound, she burst into tears of joy.   After thanking the hunter again, Little Red Ridlng Hood and her mother setoff towards the wood. As they walked quickly through the trees, the littlegirl told her mother: "We must always stay on the path and never stop. Thatway, we come to no harm!"


Storytelling

  • The End


Goldilocks and the three bears

Goldilocks and the Three Bears

  • There was once a family of bears who lived in a cozy cottage in the woods.  There was a great big Papa Bear, a medium size Momma Bear, and a little tiny baby bear.One morning Mama Bear cooked them some porridge for breakfast.  As the porridge was too hot to eat, the three bears decided to take a walk in the woods while it cooled.


Storytelling

  • They had not been gone long when a little girl named Goldilocks came along.  She had been picking flowers and had wandered into the woods.  When she saw the three bears cottage, she smiled and clapped her hands. "How pretty!" she cried. "I wonder who lives there?"  She stood on her toes and peaked in the window. There didn't seem to be anyone home, so Goldilocks opened the door and went right inside!


Storytelling

  • The first thing she saw was the table set with three bowls of porridge; a great big bowl for Papa Bear, a medium size bowl for Momma Bear, and a tiny little bowl for baby bear.  "Oh, that porridge smells good!" Goldilocks said.  Then, as she was feeling a little hungry, she picked up a spoon and tasted the porridge in the Great Big Bowl.


Storytelling

  • "OUCH!" she cried, dropping the spoon. "That porridge is MUCH too hot!"

  • She tasted the porridge in the medium size bowl.  But that porridge was MUCH too cold.

  • Then she tasted the porridge in the tiny little bowl.  "Mmmmmm," she said. "This porridge is JUST right!"  so she ate it all up!


Storytelling

  • Then Goldilocks saw the three chairs set before the fire; a Great Big Chair for Papa Bear, a Medium Size Chair for Mamma Bear, and a Tiny Little Chair for Baby Bear. "Oh, it would be nice to sit down for a while!"  Goldilocks thought.

  • So she climbed into the Great Big Chair that belonged to Papa Bear. "Oh, no!" she said. "That chair is MUCH too hard."

  • Then she sat in Mamma Bears Medium size Chair "Oh, no," she said. "That chair is MUCH too soft!"

  • Next, she sat in Baby Bears Tiny Little Chair. "Ahhhh," she said with a smile. "This chair is JUST right!"

  • Just then there was a loud CRAAACK! and the little chair broke right through!


Storytelling

  • Goldilocks stood up and dusted herself off.  Then she climbed upstairs to the bedroom.  There she saw three beds all in a row. "Oh," she said, yawning, "I am feeling sleepy."

  • So she pulled down the covers and climbed into Papa Bears Great Big Bed. But she quickly jumped down. "That bed is MUCH too hard!" she said.

  • Then she tried Mamma Bears Medium size bed.  But it was too soft.


Storytelling

  • So she climbed into Baby Bears Tiny Little Bed. It was JUST right. Soon Goldilocks was fast asleep!

  • A little while later the Three Bears returned from their walk.  They were feeling very hungry and were looking forward to eating the nice bowls of tasty porridge.

  • Suddenly Papa cried out in his Great Big voice, "Someone has been eating my porridge!"

  • Then Mamma cried out in her medium size voice, "Someone has been eating MY porridge!"

  • And Baby Bear cried out in his Tiny Little Voice, "Some has been eating my porridge. And they've eaten it ALL UP


Storytelling

  • Then the Three Bears saw their chairs near the fireplace.

  • "Someone has been sitting in my chair!" Papa Bear said in his Great Big Voice.

  • "Someone has been sitting in MY chair!" Mamma Bear said in her medium size voice.

  • "Someone has been sitting in MY chair," Baby Bear cried in his tiny little voice. "And now it's BROKEN!"

  • Then the Three Bears went upstairs to the bedroom


Storytelling

  • "Someone has been sleeping in my bed!" Papa Bear shouted in his Great Big Voice.

  • "And someone has been sleeping in MY bed!" Mamma Bear exclaimed in her Medium Size Voice.

  • "Someone has been sleeping in MY bed," Baby Bear squeaked in his Tiny Little Voice. "AND HERE SHE IS!"

  • Just then Goldilocks woke up!  When she saw the three bears standing around her, she leaped off the bed and ran down the stairs and out the door.


Storytelling

  • She didn't stop until she was all the way back home.

  • And the Three Bears never saw Goldilocks again!

  • The End


The three little pigs

The Three little pigs

  • All summer long, they roamed through the woods and over the plains, playinggames and having fun. None were happier than the three little pigs, and theyeasily made friends with everyone. Wherever they went, they were given a warmwelcome, but as summer drew to a close, they realized that folk were driftingback to their usual jobs, and preparing for winter.


Storytelling

  • Autumn came and it beganto rain. The three little pigs started to feel they needed a real home. Sadlythey knew that the fun was over now and they must set to work like the others,or they'd be left in the cold and rain, with no roof over their heads. Theytalked about what to do, but each decided for himself. The laziest little pigsaid he'd build a straw hut.


Storytelling

  •    "It will only take a day,' he said. The others disagreed.   "It's too fragile," they said disapprovingly, but he refused to listen. Notquite so lazy, the second little pig went in search of planks of seasonedwood.


Storytelling

  • "Clunk! Clunk! Clunk!" It took him two days to nail them together. But thethird little pig did not like the wooden house.

  •    "That's not the way to build a house!" he said. "It takes time, patienceand hard work to build a house that is strong enough to stand up to wind,rain, and snow, and most of all, protect us from the wolf!"


Storytelling

  • The days went by, and the wisest little pig's house took shape, brick bybrick. From time to time, his brothers visited him, saying with a chuckle:   "Why are you working so hard? Why don't you come and play?" But thestubborn bricklayer pig just said "no".


Storytelling

  •    "I shall finish my house first. It must be solid and sturdy. And then I'llcome and play!" he said. "I shall not be foolish like you! For he who laughslast, laughs longest!"

  •    It was the wisest little pig that found the tracks of a big wolf in theneighbourhood.


Storytelling

  •   The little pigs rushed home in alarm. Along came the wolf, scowlingfiercely at the laziest pig's straw hut.

  •    "Come out!" ordered the wolf, his mouth watering. I want to speak to you!"   "I'd rather stay where I am!" replied the little pig in a tiny voice.   "I'll make you come out!" growled the wolf angrily, and puffing out hischest, he took a very deep breath. Then he blew with all his might, right ontothe house.


Storytelling

  • And all the straw the silly pig had heaped against some thin poles,fell down in the great blast. Excited by his own cleverness, the wolf did notnotice that the little pig had slithered out from underneath the heap ofstraw, and was dashing towards his brother's wooden house. When he realizedthat the little pig was escaping, the wolf grew wild with rage.

  •    "Come back!" he roared, trying to catch the pig as he ran into the woodenhouse.


Storytelling

  • The other little pig greeted his brother, shaking like a leaf.   "I hope this house won't fall down! Let's lean against the door so he can'tbreak in!"

  •    Outside, the wolf could hear the little pigs' words. Starving as he was, atthe idea of a two-course meal, he rained blows on the door.

  •    "Open up! Open up! I only want to speak to you!"


Storytelling

  •   Inside, the two brothers wept in fear and did their best to hold the doorfast against the blows. Then the furious wolf braced himself a new effort: hedrew in a really enormous breath, and went ... WHOOOOO! The wooden housecollapsed like a pack of cards.

  •    Luckily, the wisest little pig had been watching the scene from the windowof his own brick house, and he rapidly opened the door to his fleeingbrothers.


Storytelling

  • And not a moment too soon, for the wolf was already hammeringfuriously on the door. This time, the wolf had grave doubts. This house had amuch more solid air than the others. He blew once, he blew again and then fora third time. But all was in vain. For the house did not budge an lnch. Thethree little pigs watched him and their fear began to fade.


Storytelling

  • Quite exhausted byhis efforts, the wolf decided to try one of his tricks. He scrambled up anearby ladder, on to the roof to have a look at the chimney. However, thewisest little pig had seen this ploy, and he quickly said:


Storytelling

  •    "Quick! Light the fire!" With his long legs thrust down the chimney, thewolf was not sure if he should slide down the black hole. It wouldn't be easyto get in, but the sound of the little pigs' voices below only made him feelhungrier.


Storytelling

  •    "I'm dying of hunger! I'm goin to try and get down." And he let himselfdrop. But landing was rather hot, too hot! The wolf landed in the fire, stunnedby his fall.


Storytelling

  •   The flames licked his hairy coat and his tail became a flaring torch.   "Never again! Never again will I go down a chimney!" he squealed, as hetried to put out the flames in his tail. Then he ran away as fast as he could.   The three happy little pigs, dancing round and round the yard, began tosing:


Storytelling

  •    "Tra-la-la! Tra-la-la! The wicked black wolf will never come back...!"

  •    From that terrible day on, the wisest little pig's brothers set to workwith a will. In less than no time, up went the two new brick houses. The wolfdid return once to roam in the neighbourhood, but when he caught sight ofthree chimneys, he remembered the terrible pain of a burnt tail, and he leftfor good.


Storytelling

  • Now safe and happy, the wisest little pig called to his brothers:   "No more work! Come on, let's go and play!"

  • The End


The three little pigs1

The Three Little Pigs


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