Lyceum
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 29

Lyceum PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 119 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Lyceum. Name of the Greek building where Aristotle taught Institution for education—lectures, concerts, etc. Gymnasium—European roots—a classical prep school; Greek youths met for physical education and discussion. The American Renaissance.

Download Presentation

Lyceum

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Lyceum

Lyceum

  • Name of the Greek building where Aristotle taught

  • Institution for education—lectures, concerts, etc.

  • Gymnasium—European roots—a classical prep school; Greek youths met for physical education and discussion


The american renaissance

The American Renaissance

Not literally a rebirth but a cultural maturity.


Lyceum

  • An indicator of intelligence or genius is one’s ability to be open to and understand new ideas.

  • One does not need to agree with these ideas; however, the willingness and ability to understand them is essential to broaden one’s intellect.


Henry david thoreau

Henry David Thoreau

  • …accept such portions as applies to them. I trust that none will stretch the seams in putting on the coat…


Lyceum

  • Mid-nineteenth century—intellectual and social ferment in New England


Not literally a rebirth but a cultural maturity

Not literally a rebirth but a cultural maturity.

  • Emerson’s Representative Men

  • Hawthorne’s The Scarlett Letter and The House of Seven Gables

  • Melville’s Moby Dick

  • Thoreau’s Walden

  • Whitman’s Leaves of Grass

  • Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle”


Lyceum

  • Noah Webster in 1783:

  • “America must be as independent in literature as she is in politics, as famous for arts as for arms.”


Lyceum

  • Lyceum Movement—founded in 1826 to improve education; named after Aristotle


Lyceum

  • An intellectual and social ferment in New England

    (Ferment—uproar, upheaval, excitement)

    Founded in 1826 to improve education


Lyceum goals

Lyceum Goals

  • Training teachers—Horace Mann

  • Alleviating horrible conditions in insane asylums—Dorthea Dix

  • Addressing problems of the blind and deaf

  • Abolishing slavery—William Lloyd Garrison

  • Establishing museums

  • Fighting for women’s rights


Ralph waldo emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Father of transcendentalism in America

1000 lectures from the east coast to the mid west.


Lyceum

  • Define transcend

  • toriseaboveorgobeyond;overpass; exceed


Lyceum

  • Transcendentalism


Lyceum

  • Originated in Europe with the German romantic philosopher Immanuel Kant


Lyceum

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson—

  • Father of transcendentalism in America

  • 1000 lectures from the east coast to the mid west

  • For Emerson, transcendentalism was not a new idea but “the oldest of thoughts cast into the mold of these new times.


The old idea from plato

The “old idea” from Plato

  • Emerson incorporated the philosophy of Plato whose theory of ideal forms reflected the essence of transcendentalism as well.

  • True reality is spiritual or IDEAL --

    not physical.


Lyceum

“The oldest of thoughts” was idealism, which originated with Plato in ancient Greece.

Plato’s theory of ideal forms


Transcendentalism

Transcendentalism

  • The idea of God, truth, happiness transcends concrete, human experience

  • True, permanent spiritual reality lies behind the transitory physical world.

    One must “transcend” the material world in order to find truth.

    Transcend—rise above, go beyond, surpass


Lyceum

  • Transcendentalists also believed in human perfectibility


Lyceum

  • The physical facts of the material world serve as a doorway to the spiritual world; therefore, man uses nature as a doorway to the spiritual world

  • Nature is deified


Lyceum

  • God is good, God created nature; therefore nature is good.

  • Man is part of nature; therefore, man is good.

  • Since man is part of nature and nature is part of God, then man is also part of God.


Lyceum

  • Therefore, God, nature, and man are unified. Man is part of one great OVERSOUL.

  • Remember Jim Casy said this


Lyceum

  • Since God, man, and nature are essentially one, man belongs to The Divine Soul or the Over Soul.

  • Man must trust in his own power to have a direct relationship with God. When man is able to have a personal relationship with God, he becomes part of the Over Soul.


Lyceum

God

Man

Nature


Lyceum

  • If each man trusts himself and knows his own goodness, then he will make the right decisions


Lyceum

  • Man needs to be optimistic and realize the godliness within himself and within other people.


Lyceum

  • God is good

  • God works through nature

  • Man is part of nature

  • Therefore man is good


Read and annotate the biography

Read and annotate the biography

  • On the back, answer the following:

  • Overall, what did Emerson advocate? List three to five ideas that best illustrate what Emerson stood for. Use complete sentences.

  • What was Emerson’s plan or hope for America? Use complete sentences.


  • Login