anti bullying practices in american schools perspectives of school psychologists
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
ANTI-BULLYING PRACTICES IN AMERICAN SCHOOLS: PERSPECTIVES OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 18

ANTI-BULLYING PRACTICES IN AMERICAN SCHOOLS: PERSPECTIVES OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 81 Views
  • Uploaded on

ANTI-BULLYING PRACTICES IN AMERICAN SCHOOLS: PERSPECTIVES OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS. By Yipling C. Sherer and Amanda B. Nickerson A review by Tommy Coleman and Sherry Saunders. Bullying.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' ANTI-BULLYING PRACTICES IN AMERICAN SCHOOLS: PERSPECTIVES OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS' - kalea


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
anti bullying practices in american schools perspectives of school psychologists

ANTI-BULLYING PRACTICES IN AMERICAN SCHOOLS: PERSPECTIVES OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS

By Yipling C. Sherer and Amanda B. Nickerson

A review by Tommy Coleman and Sherry Saunders

bullying
Bullying
  • “… a specific form of aggressive behavior that is characterized by an intention to harm, repeated occurrence, and an imbalance of power between the bully and the victim.”
  • Two types

-Aggressive

-Indirect

slide3

Prevention Strategies

  • System-level interventions
  • School staff and parents
  • Education approaches with students
  • Student involvement
  • Interventions with bullies and victims
slide4

Leadership Frames

Structural

-schedules, increasing supervision

Human Resources

-training, teaming

Political

-legal topic, public concern

Symbolic

-climate/culture, public image

slide5

Questions Addressed

  • What anti-bullying strategies are most/least frequently implemented?
  • What anti-bullying strategies do school psychologists perceive as most or least effective?
  • What areas do school psychologists perceive as most in need of improvement?
  • What barriers make improvement difficult?
slide6

The Study

  • 213 school psychologists were surveyed about their school’s anti-bullying strategies.
  • 43 anti-bullying strategies were included.
  • Respondents reported on the use of strategies and their opinion of effectiveness.
  • Similar strategies were grouped into 20 reporting areas.
slide7

Findings

Most frequently used strategies

-School staff talk with bullies

following incident

-Disciplinary consequences

-Increase supervision in less

structured areas

Least frequently used strategies

-Peer juries to “try” bullies

-Anti-bullying committee

-Student peer counseling for

victims

slide8

Findings Continued-Perceived Most Effective Strategies-School-wide positive behavior support plan-Modified space and schedule for less structured activities-Immediate response to bullying incident-Perceived Least Effective-Avoid contact between bullies and victims-Zero tolerance policy for bullies-Written anti-bullying policy

strategies most in need of improvement
Strategies Most in Need of Improvement
  • Staff education and training
  • Bullying reporting procedure
  • School-wide positive behavior support plan
slide10

Barriers-Priorities focused on other issues-Underestimation of the severity of bullying problems-Lack of trained staff-Quality of available training material

rigor of the article
Rigor of the Article
  • The sample was random but

small.

  • The results were consistent

with other studies noted in

the article.

  • 65% of the sample worked in

elementary schools.

  • Responses were based on

perception.

  • Some respondents endorsed

strategies not present in their

schools.

type of policy
Type of Policy
  • Bullying policy is largely regulatory:

-Involves rules to govern behavior

-Typically are generalized terms applied to

large groups

-Can imply enforced penalties

-Can include licensing requirements

slide13

Useful Strategies for Policy Support-Schedule Meetings with Parents-School-Wide Intervention Policy-Increased Supervision-School Assemblies-Teacher In-Service Training-Classroom Interventions-Develop Teaching Modules

benefits of the policy
Benefits of the Policy
  • Incidences of bullying are reduced
  • Students improve interpersonal relationship skills
  • School safety is enhanced
  • Positive community perception
unintended consequences
Unintended Consequences

-Over reporting

-False reporting

-Time consuming

-Personnel requirements

-Resistance

implications for school leaders
Implications for School Leaders
  • Examine present practices
  • Measure effectiveness
  • Research
  • Build support
  • Implement changes
  • Re-evaluate
sources
Sources
  • Bolman, L. G., & Deal, T. G (2003). Reframing organizations: Artistry, choice, and leadership. San Francisco:Jossey-Bass.
  • Sherer, Y. C., & Nickerson, A. B. (2010). Anti- bullying practices in American schools: Perspectives of school psychologists. Psychology In The Schools, 47(3), 217-229.
  • http://www.metatube.com/en/videos/cid48/Gente-y-Blogs/99156/Extremely-Powerful-Anti-Bullying-Video/
ad