The course syllabus a guide for student success
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The Course Syllabus A Guide for Student Success. Office for Faculty Excellence Dorothy H. Muller. Whether you’re a seasoned faculty member with many syllabi in your files or a beginning faculty member, please check out this information about the syllabus at ECU. June 2011.

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The Course Syllabus A Guide for Student Success

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The course syllabus a guide for student success

The Course SyllabusA Guide for Student Success

Office for Faculty Excellence

Dorothy H. Muller

Whether you’re a seasoned faculty member with many syllabi in your files or a beginning faculty member, please check out this information about the syllabus at ECU.

June 2011


The course syllabus a guide for student success

Mentor in a Manual: Climbing the Academic Ladder to Tenure. 2nd ed. By A. Clay Schoenfeld & Robert Magnan. Madison, WI: Magna Publications, Inc. 1994.

“The syllabus should serve as a map for your journey through the semester. It should provide enough detail to direct your students, but not so much that they feel overly programmed. Think of your role as that of a tour guide: you want your schedule to indicate the major activities, but allow freedom to explore side roads according to the interests and needs of your class, serendipity, fate, and human elements. “ (Schoenfeld & Magnan, page 198)

Howard Altman quote: Since the course syllabus becomes a written legal covenant between the instructor and the students in the course, each syllabus should end with a caveat of the following sort: “The above schedule and procedures in the course are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.” This caveat protects the instructor and department if changes in the syllabus need to be made once the course is underway. (page 198)


Ecu faculty manual part 5 academic information

ECU Faculty Manual – Part 5: Academic Information

M. Course Expectations and Requirements

High expectations for student achievement are important for all students and are a key aspect of student retention. The course syllabus informs students of the expectations and requirements of the course and reduces the likelihood of problems later in the semester. The syllabus is a tool that helps both faculty and students accomplish the university’s primary mission of teaching and learning. Faculty members are required to provide a course syllabus for students at the beginning of each semester. The syllabus should make clear the goals and content of the course and what will be expected of students in the course. A course syllabus should specify the instructor’s policies for class attendance, grading, civility in the classroom, and academic integrity. The syllabus should also include a schedule for tests, and assignments.

It is the responsibility of each unit administrator to have copies of syllabi for all courses taught in the school or department. (FS Resolution #10-08, February 2010)

[Note: Many faculty hand out and review the syllabus at the first class meeting. Online instructors often include a beginning assignment where student review and take a quiz on the syllabus.] For more, see

http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/fsonline/customcf/facultymanual/newmanual/part5.pdf.


Ecu syllabus resources

ECU Syllabus Resources

The ECU course approval process requires submission of a syllabus. The following proposals provide information to guide faculty in creating syllabi for their teaching of those classes.

Graduate course proposal

http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/gcc/upload/12_05_07_HLTH_6005_Course_Proposal_Form-3.doc

Undergraduate course proposal

http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/fsonline/customcf/committee/cu/courseproposalformWord.doc


Ecu syllabus resources1

ECU Syllabus Resources

  • In order to be prepared should a disaster require teaching from a distance, all courses (on campus and distance education) have a BlackBoard site. Once your department has assigned you a course, that course will be listed on your BlackBoard site. If nothing else, you should upload your syllabus. Go to https://blackboard.ecu.edu and sign in using your userid (Banner ID) and password. Even DE instructors using some other delivery system should load their syllabus and provide instruction about accessing their course.

  • Departmental copies of approved syllabi. Check with your department to see if syllabi are on file for courses you will teach.

  • Teaching Awards Syllabi. Examples of syllabi from award winning faculty F2F and DE are available in the Office for Faculty Excellence (Old Cafeteria Complex, 2306).

  • New Faculty Blackboard site: https://blackboard.ecu.edu/ (guest signin: newfaculty for both id and password). See Introduction to College Teaching, Session 4 for more information.

  • Resource books on developing the syllabus are available in the library and in the Office for Faculty Excellence


The course syllabus a guide for student success

A Guide to Faculty Development: Practical Advice, Examples, and Resources. Edited by Kay Herr Gillespie: Bolton Mass: Anker Publishing Company, 2002.

Course Information: Includes course title, course number, credit hours, location of the classroom, days and hours of class/ lab/studio/etc.

Instructor Information: Includes name, title, office location, office phone number, office hours, teaching associates (TAs).

Textbooks, Readings, and Materials: Includes title, author, date, publisher,and why it or they were chosen. Text(s) should be chosen for representation

and treatment of course content and goals. Authors should be chosen fortheir treatment of multiple perspectives. Readings and materials should bechosen for their representation of diverse perspectives.

Course Description and Goals: Includes course and multicultural goals andwhy these goals are important for teaching and learning. Might include a rationale for instructional methods. Instructional methods should capitalize on students’ experiences, learning, and cognitive styles. Course objectives for multicultural teaching and learning should address cognitive, affective, and behavioral domains (Kitano, 1997)

Gillespie was writing for face-to-face courses. Be sure to provide access and other information for online students.


Distance education access communication process community

Distance Education – Access, Communication, Process, Community

Means of communication – provide a system and more than one means of communication (Ex. BB and email; course name in subject line).

Location of Classroom –replaced by explanation of course delivery and expectations- Technology requirements; synchronous and/or asynchronous instruction; how the class will be conducted – Blackboard, Centra, blogs, Camtasia; testing including proctoring requirements; etc. (Often faculty send a letter before the beginning of the course describing the course delivery and asking students to read the syllabus and respond in an email, take a BB quiz, or something else.)

Instructor Information: Includes name, title, office location, office and/or otherphone number, office hours – See Faculty Manual. Provide DE students with a timeframe for response to their communications. Often DE instructors have more virtual office hours than their office hours for face-to-face classes.

Textbooks, Readings, and Materials: Includes title, author, date, publisher,and how materials will be used. Check with the Library about embedded librarians or course resources.

Course Description and Goals: Same as face to face

Community: Explain groups and how students will interact with each other and you.


The course syllabus a guide for student success

A Guide to Faculty Development: Practical Advice, Examples, and Resources. Edited by Kay Herr Gillespie: Bolton Mass: Anker Publishing Company, 2002, cont. (List adapted from Altman and Cashin, 1992)

Course Calendar and Schedule: Includes a daily or weekly schedule of class activities such as readings, assignments, and due dates, lecture topics,quizzes, and exams. Assessment strategies should provide students with avariety of ways for mastering course content.

Course Policies: Includes attendance, lateness, class participation, missedassignments and exams, lab safety, academic misconduct, and grading. Communicates a tone of high expectations for all students and a knowledge of the research on differential interaction patterns of underrepresentedgroups.

Available Support Services and Resources: Includes a statement for students who may require support services from offices such as disabilityservices, academic learning center, tutoring center, [SI], library, and computercenter. Resources should accommodate the social and cultural characteristics and experiences of the students.


The course syllabus a guide for student success

Make course policies clear. It is particularly important in DE classes where students can’t refine their understanding through questions to provide adequate explanation.

  • Course Policies:

  • Attendance – How do you feel about attendance, lateness, class participation, missed assignments and exams. Don’t expect students to read your mind; lay out your expectations. Sometime professors engage student in developing course expectations.

  • The University has policies related to lab safety, academic misconduct, class conduct (disruption policy), and grading - Check the Faculty Manual for information.

  • Caveat for change if necessary - Include a statement that you reserve the right to adjust the syllabus if necessary.


Include a statement concerning disabilities support

Include a statement concerning disabilities support:

Disabilities Statement

East Carolina University seeks to comply fully with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Students requesting accommodations based on a disability must be registered with the Department for Disability Support Services located in Slay 138 ((252) 737-1016 (Voice/TTY)).

For more information, go to http://www.ecu.edu/cs%2Dstudentlife/dss/

For DE classes, provide way for students to contact you about needing accommodations privately.


Expect appropriate behavior

Expect appropriate behavior

Academic integrity

Disruption of class

Civility in the class community (for DE classes, share netiquette matters such as all caps, providing context, etc.)


The course syllabus a guide for student success

X. Academic Integrity – Expect Academic Integrity

http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/fsonline/customcf/facultymanual/newmanual/part5.pdf

The Academic Integrity Policy governs student conduct directly related to academic activities involving ECU students. All alleged violations of the policy must be resolved in accordance with the procedures outlined in the Academic Integrity Policy as found in Part IV Academic Integrity of the ECU Faculty Manual. The Academic Integrity Policy is available to students at: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-studentlife/policyhub/academic_integrity.cfm. (FS Resolution #10-63, April 2010)

https://author.ecu.edu/cs-acad/fsonline/customcf/facultymanual/part4/part4.htm

Penalties by range from having to redo an assignment to a grade of 0 on an assignment to failure of the course. Below is an example from an ECU syllabus:


The course syllabus a guide for student success

Disruption Statement – Undergraduate Cataloghttp://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/ugcat/regulations.cfm#disruptive

East Carolina University is committed to providing each student with a rich, distinctive educational experience. To this end, students who do not follow reasonable standards of behavior in the classroom, or other academic setting may be removed from the course by the instructor following appropriate notice. Students removed from a course under this policy will receive a grade of “drop” according to university policy, and are eligible for a tuition refund as specified in the current tuition refund policy.

This policy also appears in the Faculty Manual Part 5, Y. More about this policy and other considerations may be found in the document: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/cfe/upload/classroom_disruption.pdf. It is a good idea to identify your expectations in your syllabus.

Revision pending final approval.

Netiquette in a DE class – Take “behavior issues” – from writing in all caps to uncollegial comments – offline.

POLICY ON DISRUPTIVE ACADEMIC BEHAVIOR


Other items that might be useful to include in your syllabus

Other items that might be useful to include inyour syllabus:

Possible weather and other emergency statement:

University emergency notices (including closings):

University emergency information can be found on the ECU homepage. It is usually highlighted with a red bar that will specify the alert.  http://www.ecu.eduor go to http://www.ecu.edu/alert

Emergency hotline: 252-328-0062

For DE classes, provide a secondary means of access should systems go down.


Ecu continuity of instruction plan 4 28 09

ECU Continuity of Instruction Plan (4/28/09)

The University has developed a contingency plan for face-to-face and DE courses. Faculty need to be prepared to continue instruction should the university be closed for face-to-face instruction and/or internet access be lost. To view the University DE Contingency Plan, go to http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/learningplatforms/contingency.cfm

Faculty Checklist - The following is provided in order to facilitate and focus attention on preparation for a catastrophic event.

Answer the Questions to Consider

Attend a Continuity of Instruction Session

Attend Blackboard Training Sessions

Test Communication Tools

Select Communication Tools to Implement

Develop a Continuity of Instruction Outline

Revise Syllabus – Continuity Syllabus

Continuity Syllabus Readily Available to Students

Ensure Just-In-Time and Just-In-Case Content Readily Available

Ensure Just-In-Time and Just-In-Case Assignments Readily Available


Ecu continuity of instruction plan 4 28 091

ECU Continuity of Instruction Plan (4/28/09)

Elmer Poe - Academic Outreach/Academic Affairs

Quick Start to Continuity of Instruction

Determine how you will communicate with your students (ECU or other email, Blackboard announcements or discussion forum, etc) and how often you will communicate.

Include a general Continuity of Instruction statement in your syllabus or Blackboard course that explains how you will continue instruction if face-to-face classes are suspended. A sample is provided below:

“In the event that face-to-face classes are suspended due to a pandemic or other catastrophe, I will strive to continue instruction to those that are able to participate.  If and when face-to-face classes are suspended, you will receive an email from me and a Blackboard Announcement that detail how we will communicate, where you can locate course information and what you can expect during this time period.  I realize that some of you may be affected by the event and not able to participate; however I will continue to provide instruction to those that are able to continue.”

Have Content readily available in Blackboard.  Content varies from lecture notes, recorded lectures, PowerPoint presentations, reading assignments, etc.

Determine teaching objectives for the time period.

Communicate with students.


The course syllabus a guide for student success

See the sample syllabus template and examples of syllabi in accompanying documents and the NFO Blackboard site.

Sample Syllabi


The course syllabus a guide for student success

Mentor in a Manual: Climbing the Academic Ladder to Tenure. 2nd ed. By A. Clay Schoenfeld & Robert Magnan. Madison, WI: Magna Publications, Inc. 1994, page 199: Mary McDonald Harris’s 10 rules for constructing a syllabus.

The syllabus conveys enthusiasm for the subject.

The syllabus conveys the intellectual challenge of the course

The syllabus provides for personalization of content.

The syllabus conveys your respect for the ability of students.

Course goals are attainable and stated positively.

Grading policies convey the possibility of success.

The syllabus adequately specifies the assignments.

Assignments vary in type of required expertise.

You assess student learning frequently.

The syllabus conveys your desire to help students individually.

If you have questions or need assistance, please contact the OFE at 328-1426/2367.


The course syllabus a guide for student success

Take a few minutes to review the example syllabus Able and answer the questions concerning its inclusion of the following for DE students:

Course Information – Is information applicable to DE students?

Instructor Information – Has the instructor provide more than one means for communication?

Textbooks, Readings, and Materials - Are resources adequately identified for DE learners?

Course Description and Goals – Are description and goals different that those in a F2F class?

Course Calendar and Schedule – Is there adequate information here or in referenced documents?

Course Policies: Includes attendance, lateness, class participation, missed assignments and exams, lab safety, academic misconduct, class conduct (disruption policy), and grading. Caveat for change if necessary. Communicates a tone of high expectations for all students and a knowledge of the research on differential interaction patterns of underrepresented groups. Has the instructor provided information appropriate for distance learners?

Available Support Services and Resources: Has the instructor included a statement for students who may require support services from offices such as disability services, academic learning center, tutoring center, [SI], library, and computer center. Resources should accommodate the social and cultural characteristics and experiences of the students appropriate for DE learners?


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