Placing our solar system in context with the spitzer space telescope
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Michael R. Meyer Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona

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Placing our solar system in context with the spitzer space telescope

Michael R. Meyer

Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona

D. Backman (NASA-Ames, D.P.I.) , S.V.W. Beckwith (STScI), J. Bouwman (MPIA), T. Brooke (Caltech), J.M. Carpenter (Caltech), M. Cohen (UC-Berkeley), U. Gorti (NASA-Ames), T. Henning (MPIA), L. Hillenbrand (Caltech, D.P.I.), D. Hines (SSI), D. Hollenbach (NASA-Ames), J. Lunine (LPL), J.S. Kim (Steward), R. Malhotra (LPL), E. Mamajek (CfA), A. Moro-Martin (Princeton ), P. Morris (SSC), J. Najita (NOAO), D. Padgett (SSC), I. Pascucci (Steward), J. Rodmann (MPIA), W. Schlingman (Steward), M. Silverstone (Steward), D. Soderblom (STScI), J.R. Stauffer (SSC), B. Stobie (Steward), S. Strom (NOAO), D. Watson (Rochester), S. Weidenschilling (PSI), S. Wolf (MPIA), and E. Young (Steward).

Placing Our Solar System in Context with the Spitzer Space Telescope


Dust from 0 3 3 au evolves on timescales comparable to the cessation of accretion cf c2d
Dust from 0.3-3 AU evolves on timescales comparable to the cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)

MIR

Silverstone et al.

(ApJ, Submitted);

See also Mamajek et al. 2004; Weinberger et al. 2004; Metchev et al. 2004.

Chrondrules?

CAI Formation?

3-10 Myr old IRAC.

Terrestrial Planets?

10-30 Myr old IRAC.


Transition time from thick to thin is 1 myr cf c2d next 2 slides
... Transition time from thick to thin cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)is < 1 Myr (cf. C2D, next 2 slides)

MIR

Silverstone et al.

(ApJ, in press)

Cf. Wolk and Walter, 1996; Kenyon and Hartmann, 1995; Prato and Simon, 1995; Skrutskie et al. 1990.

Out of a sample of

> 70 stars 3-30 Myr old, 5 optically-thick disks, and no optically-thin disks.


Disk timescales from c2d
Disk timescales - from C2D cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)

* Some wTTs do have disks

not previously detected,

BUT only the younger ones

( ages < 3 to 6 Myr)

[ages are ~ uncertain]

* 1/2 the young ones lack disks, even at age 0.8 to 1.5 Myr

* Age is NOT the only variable

Big RED circle: has disk

Padgett et al., in prep; Cieza et al., in prep.


Some disks have inner holes
Some disks have inner holes cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)

* Some wTTs have inner holes, but small fraction of systems.

* May be cleared by planet formation

* Infer that disk clearing is fast

* Planet formation is “fast or not at all”

Cieza et al., in prep.


Examples of warm debris 100 k around sun like stars are rare a few
Examples of warm debris (> 100 K) cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)around Sun-like stars are rare (a few %)

MIR

Warm debris (perhaps 4-6 AU) around 30 Myr old sun-like star! Hines et al. (ApJ, in press); Mamajek et al. poster, this meeting.


But more common around stars 100 myr
...but more common around stars < 100 Myr. cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)

MIR

Bouwman et al. (in preparation); cf. Beichman et al. (2005);

Song et al. (2005), Chen et al. (2005); Kenyon & Bromley (2004)


Solar-type stars in the Pleiades (age ~ 100 Myr) cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)

5 cases of excess at 24 & 33 mm; 2-3 probably real (not bkg)

Stauffer et al. 2005; Stauffer et al. poster, this meeting


GAS cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)

Detecting

Cool Gas in Disks

is HARD!

Gorti & Hollenbach (2004); also Najita et al. poster, this mtg

GAS DETECTABLE HERE

GAS MAS

DUST MASS


Gas disk lifetimes appear to be 10 myr
Gas disk lifetimes appear to be < 10 Myr. cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)

GAS

=> No gas rich disk

(> 0.1 Mjup) detected.

=> 20 stars with ages 3-100 Myr

Hollenbach et al. (ApJ, 2005); Najita et al. poster, this mtg


MMSN = minimum mass solar nebula cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)


Cool debris disks t 100 k are fairly common 15 20 around sun like stars
Cool Debris Disks (T < 100 K) are fairly cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)common (15-20 %) around Sun-like stars

FIR

30+- 10 Myr

45 to ??? AU

~1x10-7 Msun

Kim et al. 2005,

Hillenbrand et al. poster, this mtg;

cf. Bryden et al. 2005

700+- 300 Myr

20 to <100 AU

~6.9x10-8 Msun


Evidence for
... evidence for ? cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)

FIR

  • Dynamically hot outer planetesimal belts

  • Lack of interior planetesimal belts

  • Clues to the physical state of the remnant disk (e.g. Najita & Williams 2005)

HR 8907

Kim et al. 2005; Hillenbrand et al. poster, this mtg


Statistics of feps 33 m detections
Statistics of FEPS 33 cessation of accretion (cf. C2D)m Detections

N/M/F-IR

NB: less common at ages > 300 Myr than 70 mm (~ 50 K) detections

See also Bryden et al. (2005)


History of our solar system s dust disk are strong old excesses extrasolar late heavy bombardments
History of our solar system’s dust disk -- are strong old excesses = extrasolar Late Heavy Bombardments?

Backman et al. in prep; cf. Gomes et al. (2005); Strom et al. (2005),

Levison et al. (PPV), Kenyon & Bromley (2004).


FEPS excesses = extrasolar Late Heavy BombardmentsPreliminary Results: Debris Disk Lifetimes

Radius (AU)

< 0.1 0.3-1.0 1-10 30-100

3-10

Lifetime (Myr)

10-30

30-100

100-300

300-1000

1000-3000


Feps posters at this meeting
FEPS posters at this meeting excesses = extrasolar Late Heavy Bombardments

  • 63.18 Silverstone et al.

    • Young, warm debris disks

  • 63.48 Mamajek et al.

    • HD 12039 (from Hines et al. in press)

  • 63.52 Najita et al.

    • Limits on circumstellar gas

  • 63.11 Stauffer et al.

    • Pleiades stars with 24 & 33 mm excesses

  • 63.28 Hillenbrand et al.

    • Old, cold debris disks (from Kim et al. 2005)

  • 63.31 Backman et al.

    • To-date FEPS results summary


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