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School Evaluation Services Presentation to NGA November 4, 2001. What Is School Evaluation Services?. Management and communication tool for administrators, policymakers, parents and other stakeholders

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School evaluation services presentation to nga november 4 2001
School Evaluation ServicesPresentation toNGANovember 4, 2001


What Is School Evaluation Services?

Management and communication tool for administrators, policymakers, parents and other stakeholders

  • Dynamic public website displays district reports, key data trends, and comparisons for each district and/or school

  • Annual independent S&P written analysis of strengths and challenges

  • Annual Statewide Insights report focused on state trends, data quality, and progress



How is information organized hundreds of data items

Student Results instead provides a rich new data resource, we have an unprecedented opportunity to assist the 34 districts in our region.”

Spending

Return on Resources

Learning Environment

Financial Environment

Demographic Environment

What are the academic results?

Where is the money spent?

What is the comparative return?

What is the scholastic context?

What is the financial context?

What is the socioeconomic context?

How Is Information Organized?Hundreds of Data Items


“This is helping to clarify the unique challenges faced by urban school districts.”

- CEO Kenneth Burnley

Detroit Public Schools

Detroit Free Press, May 25, 2001

“It's the most comprehensive evaluation of schools that I've seen.”

- Superintendent Craig Misner

Kalamazoo RESA

Kalamazoo Gazette, May 24, 2001


Unique analytical framework www ses standardandpoors com

Not only data, but written analysis urban school districts.”

“Return on Resources”—simultaneous examination of spending, results, and context

Each district compared to four benchmarks: state, regional, and socioeconomic peer averages; and district over time

Multi-year trends measure progress

Website allows users to customize comparison groups

Unique Analytical Frameworkwww.ses.standardandpoors.com


“The real power of this report will be to allow school districts to compare themselves to other similar school districts and look for exceptions. That would be very helpful to discover if there are deficiencies.”

- Superintendent David Dresslar

Jenison School District

The Grand Rapids Press, May 25, 2001


Statewide Insights districts to compare themselves to other similar school districts and look for exceptions. That would be very helpful to discover if there are deficiencies.”

Michigan Findings

  • MEAP data analysis reveals success and challenges in educational achievement but also raises questions about state’s accountability program.

    • Overall pass rates are low

    • Not a “value added” system

    • Snapshot versus continuum

    • Timing is problematic


Statewide Insights districts to compare themselves to other similar school districts and look for exceptions. That would be very helpful to discover if there are deficiencies.”

Michigan Findings

  • Significant Achievement Gaps exist across the state, in school districts and in school buildings

    • Many of these gaps are more pervasive than places that research says should “be expected”

    • Gaps in achievement may be significantly understated


Statewide Insights districts to compare themselves to other similar school districts and look for exceptions. That would be very helpful to discover if there are deficiencies.”

Michigan Findings

Many schools and districts are “beating the odds”


Statewide Insights districts to compare themselves to other similar school districts and look for exceptions. That would be very helpful to discover if there are deficiencies.”

Michigan Findings

  • Major indicators of student achievement are misaligned

    • Graduation and dropout rates are problematic due to measurement methodology

    • 57% MEAP HS pass rate versus 81% graduation rate

    • e.g. 29,000 HS graduates did not pass the reading test

    • MEAP vs. NAEP 4th grade


Statewide Insights districts to compare themselves to other similar school districts and look for exceptions. That would be very helpful to discover if there are deficiencies.”

Michigan Findings

  • When looking at MEAP and other student results indicators, how money is spent and the context in which it is spent is at least as important as the “amount” of money spent.

  • Through examination of numerous “return indicators” (PCIs), it appears that increased spending alone is not likely to accomplish the goal of having all students meet state standards. The return on resources must be improved.


What Do the Data Tell Us? districts to compare themselves to other similar school districts and look for exceptions. That would be very helpful to discover if there are deficiencies.”

  • No silver bullets

  • Need to align policy making with data analysis

  • Without improved “return”, goals of improvement of student achievement overall and of closing achievement gaps are probably unaffordable

  • Districts and schools that are “beating the odds” are potential sources of best practice

  • State’s accountability system needs to improve


What Influence Can the Data Have? districts to compare themselves to other similar school districts and look for exceptions. That would be very helpful to discover if there are deficiencies.”

  • Increased parent involvement

  • Increased communication between schools and community

  • Enhanced ability to identify needs in districts

  • Greater accuracy of data collection and reporting

  • More complete examination of prior assumptions about accreditation and resource allocation at the state level


Why states need a third party

Perceived political biases interfere with or “limit” analysis

Economies of scale— no state alone would be willing to expend amount necessary to have a comprehensive system

Technological Advantages—sophisticated technology tools and content are constantly and rapidly being improved without requests for unplanned appropriations

Standard Analytical Framework—will allow comparisons between states and across state lines for individual districts

- Michigan and Pennsylvania are the first states to lead the nation by participating in a new standard

Why States Need a Third Party?


Why standard poor s

SES based on more than 5 years of research & development analysis

Reputation for objectivity and analytical rigor

Vast experience in public sector analysis

Global provider of analytical benchmarks

Experienced staff and advisors, including educators and administrators

Why Standard & Poor’s?


“Standard & Poor's School Evaluation Services is an excellent example of providing parents and taxpayers with a more complete picture of their school's performance…The S&P system has overwhelming support…”

- Bob Chase, President

National Education Association

Letter to the Editor, Wall Street Journal, July 31, 2001


Ses national board of advisors
SES National Board of Advisors excellent example of providing parents and taxpayers with a more complete picture of their school's performance…The S&P system has overwhelming support…”

  • Former Governor Jim Hunt, Chair of SES Advisory Board

  • Christopher Cross, President and CEO of the Council for Basic Education

  • Dr. Susan Fuhrman, Dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania

  • Dr. Jim Kelly, Former President and CEO of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards

  • Dr. Ted Sanders, President of the Education Commission of the States


“When you involve people in the process, you lessen resistance and maximize benefit. All of us should learn from their efforts.”

-Tom Watkins

Michigan Superintendent of Public Instruction

Michigan Department of Education News Release, May 23, 2001


Understanding and Applying the Data resistance and maximize benefit. All of us should learn from their efforts.”

  • In many districts and states, there are not sufficient resources and staff to conduct thorough analysis and benchmarking, SES fills that void

  • Helps districts and policymakers avoid being “data rich but information poor”

  • Helps end policymakers’ reliance on anecdotal generalizations


What Influence Does the Data Have? resistance and maximize benefit. All of us should learn from their efforts.”

  • Increased parent involvement

  • Increased communication between schools and community

  • Increased ability to identify needs in districts

  • More accurate data collection and reporting

  • More complete examination of prior assumptions about accreditation and resource allocation at the state level


“For parents it’s a godsend…relevant data about how schools are performing…For the first time a nonpartisan company with considerable analytical skills and no connection to the education establishment has undertaken an objective analysis of school systems.”

-Pete duPont

Former Governor of Delaware

Wall Street Journal Opinion Journal, October 17, 2001


“SES is beginning to change the balance of power in America’s public-school systems, among our most insular bureaucratic structures. SES information will change the way parents perceive their schools, and that will change the way schools work, and then one day, that will change the way the world works.”

-Pete duPont

Former Governor of Delaware

Wall Street Journal Opinion Journal, October 17, 2001


How Does SES Assist with ESEA? America’s public-school systems, among our most insular bureaucratic structures. SES information will change the way parents perceive their schools, and that will change the way schools work, and then one day, that will change the way the world works.”

  • Increased accountability through transparency

  • Increased disclosure of disaggregated data

  • Measures of annual progress and longer term trend analyses

  • Measures to understand and therefore help maximize return on federal and state dollars

  • Ability to rapidly adapt and include multiple measures of performance


How Will Comparability Be Achieved? America’s public-school systems, among our most insular bureaucratic structures. SES information will change the way parents perceive their schools, and that will change the way schools work, and then one day, that will change the way the world works.”

  • Use NAEP as a benchmark for state test comparisons

  • Other student results measures such as SAT, ACT and AP scores and participation rates

  • Basic financial data are comparable across most states and therefore, so too are braod measures of “return”


"I've already heard from several superintendents who shared with me their plans to review the reports, to confer with their colleagues from districts with similar characteristics and challenges, and to identify best practices that may be replicated in their own districts. I'm happy the service is turning out to be so helpful to local educators."

-Mike Flanagan, Executive Director

Michigan Association of School Administrators

Capital Journal, May 25, 2001


Where to find ses
Where To Find SES with me their plans to review the reports, to confer with their colleagues from districts with similar characteristics and challenges, and to identify best practices that may be replicated in their own districts. I'm happy the service is turning out to be so helpful to local educators."


“It’s good to have them [Standard & Poor’s] doing it. I’m very excited about it. I regret that I won’t be in a position to do something about these conclusions over the next 15 months, over the next couple of years, but I think Pennsylvania ought to take them to heart.”

-Tom Ridge

Former Governor of Pennsylvania

The Harrisburg Patriot News, October 5, 2001


Michigan Elementary Schools I’m very excited about it. I regret that I won’t be in a position to do something about these conclusions over the next 15 months, over the next couple of years, but I think Pennsylvania ought to take them to heart.”

MEAPPassi

n

g

(%)

Economically Disadvantaged Students (%)


Michigan K-12 Districts I’m very excited about it. I regret that I won’t be in a position to do something about these conclusions over the next 15 months, over the next couple of years, but I think Pennsylvania ought to take them to heart.”

M

EAP

Pa

s

s

i

n

g

(%)

Operating Spending Per Student ($)


BEATING THE ODDS 3 YEARS RUNNING I’m very excited about it. I regret that I won’t be in a position to do something about these conclusions over the next 15 months, over the next couple of years, but I think Pennsylvania ought to take them to heart.”


SES Michigan Advisory Group I’m very excited about it. I regret that I won’t be in a position to do something about these conclusions over the next 15 months, over the next couple of years, but I think Pennsylvania ought to take them to heart.”

  • Mike Addonizzio, Associate Professor, College of Education, Wayne State University

  • Chuck Anderson, Executive Director of the Michigan Education Association

  • Madhu Anderson, Director of the Center Education Performance and Information

  • Mike Flanagan, Executive Director of the Michigan Association of School Administrators

  • Justin King, Executive Director of the Michigan Association of School Boards


SES Michigan Advisory Group (cont.) I’m very excited about it. I regret that I won’t be in a position to do something about these conclusions over the next 15 months, over the next couple of years, but I think Pennsylvania ought to take them to heart.”

  • Doug Roberts, State Treasurer, Michigan Department of Treasury

  • Dan Quisenberry, President of the Michigan Association of Public School Academies

  • Jim Sandy, Director for the Michigan Business Leaders for Education Excellence

  • Ray Telman, Executive Director of the Middle Cities Education Association

  • Tom Watkins, Superintendent of Public Instruction for the Michigan Department of Education

  • Tom White, Executive Director of the Michigan School Business Officials


SES Complements Existing State I’m very excited about it. I regret that I won’t be in a position to do something about these conclusions over the next 15 months, over the next couple of years, but I think Pennsylvania ought to take them to heart.”

Accountability Programs

  • Michigan and Pennsylvania have extensive school information systems and have supplemented them with SES

  • SES assembles data from fragmented sources into a single database

  • SES enhances state report cards by providing additional data, trends, benchmarks and comparisons.


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