What to do when working in a fume hood ric
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What to do when: Working in a Fume Hood – RIC. What to look for First of all, make sure the fume hood is operational and that there is air flow These hoods have low-flow alarms, check to make sure the light is green or yellow (standby). There will be an audible alarm if the air flow drops

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What to do when: Working in a Fume Hood – RIC

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What to do when working in a fume hood ric

What to do when:Working in a Fume Hood – RIC

  • What to look for

  • First of all, make sure the fume hood is operational and that there is air flow

  • These hoods have low-flow alarms, check to make sure the light is green or yellow (standby). There will be an audible alarm if the air flow drops

  • Check the inspection sticker to make sure the face velocity has been checked in the past year

It’s all about the air flow:

  • Improper air flow can lead to backspill of contaminants out of the fume hood

  • Make sure you are working as far back as possible – at least six inches ( ~ 15 cm) from the front of the fume hood

  • Clutter (chemical or equipment storage) in a fume hood creates turbulence

  • Materials sitting directly on the work surface block the incoming air and propel it back toward the chemical fume hood face.

  • If chemical containers or bulky devices must be kept in the chemical fume hood during an experiment, they should be elevated 2 to 3 inches above the interior work surface using jacks, apparatus scaffolding, support stands, ring stands, etc.

  • The fume hoods are equipped with motion sensors, which will turn up the face velocity to the hood when workers are nearby.

6 inches 15 cm

  • Using the Sash

  • Make sure the sash is no higher than it needs to be

  • You want the sash to be pulled down in front of your face

  • Do not use a prop – if a sash won’t stay up on it’s own, report it to work control to get fixed

  • Make sure you close the sash all the way when you are not using the fume hood. This saves energy


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