Chapter 13 emergency incident management
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Chapter 13 Emergency Incident Management. Introduction. Incidents come in all types and sizes As you become more skilled in size-up and applying strategic priorities, you can better assist the person in command of the incident

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Chapter 13 Emergency Incident Management

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Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Chapter 13Emergency Incident Management


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Introduction

  • Incidents come in all types and sizes

  • As you become more skilled in size-up and applying strategic priorities, you can better assist the person in command of the incident

  • By learning ICS prior to an incident, resources from different agencies and disciplines can come together at the scene and operate in an effective, coordinated manner


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 1

Need for a Plan at Every Incident

  • MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITY

    • Primarily first-in fire officer

    • Resources and control

    • INCIDENT PLANNING

    • Effective utilization of resources

    • Resolve incident without further damage


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 2

Offensive, Defensive,

and Combination Attacks

  • OFFENSIVE MODE

    • Resources applied directly

    • Risk versus benefit

    • DEFENSIVE MODE

    • Fire is too large or well established

    • Risk to personnel is too high


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 2

Offensive, Defensive,

and Combination Attacks

  • COMBINATION MODE

    • Both offensive and defensive modes

    • Requires good communication

    • Used on large wildland incidents

    • Used to add structure protection

    • Requires careful coordination


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 3 and 4

Need for Organized Thought Process

Strategic Priorities at an Incident

  • LAYMAN’S SEVEN STRATEGIC PRIORITIES

    • Rescue

    • Exposure protection

    • Confinement

    • Extinguishment

    • Overhaul

    • Cont.


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 3 and 4

Need for Organized Thought Process

Strategic Priorities at an Incident

  • LAYMAN’S SEVEN STRATEGIC PRIORITIES

    • Salvage operations

    • Ventilation

    • ORDER OF SEVEN STRATEGIC PRIORITIES

    • Not necessarily performed in order

    • Acronym is “RECEO SV”


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 5

Strategy, Tactics, and Tasks

  • STRATEGIES

    • Plans to achieve a goal or objective

    • TACTICS

    • Actions taken to achieve strategies

    • TASKS

    • Pieces of work to achieve the tactics


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 5

Strategy, Tactics, and Tasks

  • COMMUNICATION

    • Personnel should not need lengthy instruction

    • Knowledge of priorities and tactics

    • Participants should understand their responsibilities

    • Should be two-way

    • Incident commanders

    • Company officers


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 6 and 7

Need for Size-Up of an Incident

Condition Reports and Performing Size-Up

  • STEPS FOR SIZE-UP

    • Determining facts

    • Anticipating probabilities

    • Assessing your own situation

    • Making a decision

    • Planning the operation


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 6 and 7

Need for Size-Up of an Incident

Condition Reports and Performing Size-Up

  • WILDLAND FIRE REPORT OF CONDITIONS

    • Correct location

    • Size

    • Fuel type

    • Slope and aspect

    • Rate of spread

    • Cont.


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 6 and 7

Need for Size-Up of an Incident

Condition Reports and Performing Size-Up

  • WILDLAND FIRE REPORT OF CONDITIONS

    • Exposures

    • Weather conditions

    • Potential of the fire

    • Additional resources needed

    • Objectives


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 6 and 7

Need for Size-Up of an Incident

Condition Reports and Performing Size-Up

  • STRUCTURE FIRE REPORT OF CONDITIONS

    • Correct location

    • Height/stories

    • Size

    • Type of structure

    • Location and area involved

      • Cont.


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 6 and 7

Need for Size-Up of an Incident

Condition Reports and Performing Size-Up

  • STRUCTURE FIRE REPORT OF CONDITIONS

    • Level of involvement

    • Exposures

    • Potential of fire

    • Additional resources needed

    • Objectives

    • Obtain an “all clear”


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 8

National Incident Management

System (NIMS)

  • HOMELAND SECURITY PRESIDENTIAL DIRECTIVE 5

    • Issued in response to September 11, 2001, attacks

    • Called for National Incident Management System

    • ESTABLISHMENT OF NIMS

    • Incident Command System (ICS) as a key feature

    • Announced in March 2004


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 9 and 11

Components of Incident Command System

Unified Command at Multijurisdictional Incident

  • INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM (ICS)

    • Standardized all-hazard incident management concept

    • Considerable internal flexibility

    • HISTORY OF ICS

    • Developed in 1970s following catastrophic fires

    • Response problems due to management of incidents


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 9 and 11

Components of Incident Command System

Unified Command at Multijurisdictional Incident

  • ICS BUILT ON BEST PRACTICES

    • Based on successful business practices

    • Tested in 30 years of applications

    • WHAT ICS IS DESIGNED TO DO

    • Meet the needs of incidents of any kind or size

    • Avoid duplicating effort


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 9 and 11

Components of Incident Command System

Unified Command at Multijurisdictional Incident

  • SOME APPLICATIONS OF ICS

    • Fire, both structural and wildland

    • Human and animal disease outbreaks

    • Hazardous material incidents

    • Terrorist incidents

    • National special security events

    • Other planned events


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 9 and 11

Components of Incident Command System

Unified Command at Multijurisdictional Incident

  • ICS FEATURES

    • Common terminology and clear text

    • Modular organization

    • Management of objectives

    • Reliance on an Incident Action Plan (IAP)

    • Management of span of control

    • Cont.


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 9 and 11

Components of Incident Command System

Unified Command at Multijurisdictional Incident

  • ICS FEATURES

    • Predesignated incident locations and facilities

    • Resource management

    • Integrated communications

    • Chain of command and unity of command

    • Cont.


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objectives 9 and 11

Components of Incident Command System

Unified Command at Multijurisdictional Incident

  • ICS FEATURES

    • Unified command

    • Transfer of command

    • Accountability

    • Mobilization

    • Information and intelligence management


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 10

Positions and Functions in ICS

  • PERFORMANCE OF MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS

    • Incident Command

    • Operations

    • Planning

    • Logistics

    • Finance/Administration


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 10

Positions and Functions in ICS

  • INCIDENT COMMANDER

    • Overall role

      • Has overall responsibility for managing incident

    • Responsibilities

    • Selecting and changing Incident Commanders

    • May change to meet needs of incident


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 10

Positions and Functions in ICS

  • EXPANDING THE ORGANIZATION

    • Command staff

    • General staff

    • ICS Section Chiefs

    • and Deputies


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 10

Positions and Functions in ICS

  • OPERATIONS SECTION

    • Operations Section Chief

      • Greatest technical expertise of the problem

    • Operations Section: Maintaining span of control

    • Operations Section: Expanding and contracting


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 10

Positions and Functions in ICS

  • PLANNING SECTION

    • Resources Unit

    • Situation Unit

    • Documentation Unit

    • Demobilization Unit


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 10

Positions and Functions in ICS

  • LOGISTICS SECTION

    • Logistics Section: Major activities

    • Logistics Service Branch

    • Logistics Support Branch


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Learning Objective 10

Positions and Functions in ICS

  • FINANCE ADMINISTRATION SECTION

    • Finance Administration Section: Major activities

    • Finance Administration Section: Units


Chapter 13 emergency incident management

Summary

  • At any time at an incident, you should be able to answer three questions: What do you have? What do you need? What is your plan?

  • For effective management of any type of incident, there must be an Incident Action Plan

  • With the standardization of the ICS across the nation through NIMS, a management team or resources from another area can be brought in to assist with an incident if the need arises

  • Management staff can adapt the structure of the organization to meet incident needs


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