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Principles of Patient Assessment in EMS PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Principles of Patient Assessment in EMS . By: Bob Elling, MPA, EMT-P & Kirsten Elling, BS, EMT-P. Chapter 2 - Listening to Patients. © 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc. . Objectives. List the major components of the communication process.

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Principles of Patient Assessment in EMS

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Principles of patient assessment in ems l.jpg

Principles of Patient Assessment in EMS

By:

Bob Elling, MPA, EMT-P

&

Kirsten Elling, BS, EMT-P


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Chapter 2 - Listening to Patients

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Objectives

  • List the major components of the communication process.

  • Describe various methods for communicating a message.

  • Explain why making a proper introduction and identifying level of training is an important factor for patient communication.

  • Provide examples of how the EMS provider can establish trust with a patient.

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Objectives (continued)

  • Explain the EMS provider’s responsibility in maintaining the patient-EMS provider relationship.

  • List examples of both positive and negative facilitation.

  • Describe the techniques EMS providers may use to encourage feedback from a patient.

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Objectives (continued)

  • Identify two factors that tend to impede verbal communications.

  • Provide examples of special challenges the EMS provider may encounter in communicating with patients and some tips to manage each.

  • Describe verbal and nonverbal factors to consider when communicating with a patient with cultural differences.

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Introduction

  • Establishing a rapport with patient and family is important

  • Effective communication between EMS provider and patient takes practice

  • Obtaining a good history is often difficult, yet necessary

  • This chapter focuses on interpersonal dynamics and communications strategies

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Communication is a 2-way process

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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The Feedback Loop

  • Sender

  • Receiver

  • Message

  • Encoding

  • Decoding

  • Feedback

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Message is Communicated

  • Verbal – speaking and observing feedback

  • Non-verbal – use of body language

  • Non-verbal – understanding of one’s personal space

  • Listening – adjust the environment so it is possible to listen

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Factors that Facilitate Effective Communication

  • Is the patient comfortable?

  • Consider your method of approach

  • Professional, respectful introductions

  • Addressing the patient: name and formality

  • Establishing trust

  • Consider the environment, modesty, emotional, and biological needs

  • Confidentiality

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Communication Techniques

  • Facilitation – positive or negative

  • Open-ended questions

  • Closed questions

  • Reflection – echoing the patient’s words to encourage the flow of conversation

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Communication Techniques (continued)

  • Clarification of confusing or ambiguous responses

  • Silence is sometimes helpful

  • Explanation to help put the patient more at ease

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Barriers to Communication

  • Words and phrases the patient does not understand

  • Technical terms should be kept to a minimum (unless dealing with a health care worker)

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Special Challenges

  • Hearing impairment

  • Visual impairment

  • Speech impairment

  • Non-English speaking

  • Developmental disability

  • Terminally ill

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Special Challenges (continued)

  • Hostile patients

  • Anxious patients

  • Abused patients

  • Patients with multiple symptoms

  • Asymptomatic patients

  • Overly talkative patients

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Communicating with Children

  • Your interview must be age appropriate

  • Kneel down to get to the child’s level

  • Involve the parent or caregiver in the interview

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Communicating with the Elderly

  • Aging rate differs with the person so do not assume all elderly are visually or hearing impaired

  • Give the patient time to discuss the chief complaint

  • Verify information with a family member or caregiver as necessary

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Cultural Considerations

  • Recognize cultural differences in your patients

  • Culture based preferences may conflict with usual medical practices

  • Don’t assume patients with a particular cultural background are different…take the time to learn about the culture

  • Consider verbal and non-verbal messages

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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Conclusion

  • Practice your listening skills

  • Do not judge

  • Demonstrate kindness, compassion, and empathy

  • Understanding basic communications skills is essential to EMS providers

© 2003 Delmar Learning, a Division of Thomson Learning, Inc.


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