The Cultural Abuse of Southern African Women: A Work in Progress
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The Cultural Abuse of Southern African Women: A Work in Progress Tori Lee, Department of Rehabilitation , Social Work and Addictions, College of Public Affairs and Community Service, and Honors College Faculty Mentor: Ami R. Moore, Ph.D . Department of Sociology,

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The Cultural Abuse of Southern African Women: A Work in Progress

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The cultural abuse of southern african women a work in progress

The Cultural Abuse of Southern African Women: A Work in Progress

Tori Lee, Department of Rehabilitation, Social Work and Addictions,

College of Public Affairs and Community Service, and Honors College

Faculty Mentor: Ami R. Moore, Ph.D. Department of Sociology,

College of Public Affairs and Community Service

Abstract

Why does this matter?

Why Has This Problem Been Ignored?

This study examines some of the cultural practices in Southern Africa that may lead to intentional and/or unintentional abuses of African women. First, it looks at the richness of African cultures and examines the conditions under which women may be abused. We also highlight why it is important for people to know about issues of cultural abuse. In addition, we explain why these issues of abuse are not healthy for women and why it is important that the conditions be changed. By examining the factors that lead to cultural abuses and at times to exiles of women, positive policies may be enacted to better the lives of African women.

In developing countries, women tend to suffer because of the standards society has forced upon them. After seeing the beauty of their customs and cultures one may wonder why abuse and mistreatment are acceptable standards in some parts of Africa.

My research questions are:

--why are women constantly abused and overlooked?

--why, in a world that has progressed so rapidly, do people seem not to see the abuses of women ?

--why are solutions not being offered?

These questions are important to entertain because morally in order to have a better world, something must be done to improve lives of all people on earth.

A Defining Moment…

What is Abuse?

“The greater the power, the more dangerous the abuse.”

Edmund Burke

"Every view of the world that becomes extinct, every culture that disappears, diminishes a possibility of life." Octavio Paz

Works Cited

RashidahIsmaili (2001). West African Women in Exile: City, University and Dislocated Village. Jenda: A Journal of Culture and African Women Studies: Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/219598 February 15, 2009.

Submitted by the Secretary-General pursuant to Security Council resolution 1325 (2000).

United Nations, Women, Peace and Security: Study, United Nations,New York.

J. MalcomThomspon(1990).Colonial Policy and the Family Life of Black Troops in French

West Africa.The International Journal of African Historical Studies,Vol. 23, No.3.Retrieved February 15,2009 from http://www.jstor.org/stable/219598

Research Methodology

Highlights From Literature Review

  • Studies have found that African women and girls are oftentimes subjected to abuse.

  • Forms of abuse are listed as beatings, arranged marriages, date rape, and possibly exile.

  • Organizations such as UNICEF are key in developing a relief plan that will end the abuse.

  • Few women are willing to share stories about their culture as well as any abusive occurrences because of fear of retaliation, stigma and shame.

  • When the stories of women who are victims of abuse are shared, the women become survivors instead of remaining victims.

Wendy K. Wilkins, Ph.D., Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsGloria C. Cox, Ph.D., Dean, Honors CollegeAndrea Kirk, Ph.D., Honors College

Ami Moore, Ph.D., Department of Sociology, College of Public Affairs and Community Service

Acknowledgements


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