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Chapter 10. Proposals and Formal Reports. Understanding Business Proposals. Definition Proposal: a persuasive offer to solve problems, provide services, or sell equipment. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition. Chapter 10, Slide 2.

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chapter 10

Chapter 10

Proposals and Formal Reports

understanding business proposals
Understanding Business Proposals

Definition

Proposal:a persuasive offer to solve problems, provide services, or sell equipment

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 2

slide3

Understanding Business Proposals

  • Kinds
  • InternalMay take the form of justification/ recommendation reports
  • External
      • Solicited: responding to RFP
      • Unsolicited: prospecting for business

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 3

slide4

Understanding Business Proposals

Kinds

Formallong, many parts

Informalshorter, six main parts

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 4

informal proposals
Introduction

Background

Proposal

Staffing

Budget

Authorization request

Informal Proposals

Informal proposals

are usually presented in 2- to 4-page letters or memos and have

six main parts.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 5

informal proposals six parts
Introduction: explains purpose, introduces author, and captures reader’s interest

Background: identifies problems and goals of project

Proposal: discusses planand schedule for solvingexisting problem

Informal Proposals: Six Parts

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 6

informal proposals six parts1
Staffing: describes credentials and expertise of project leaders

Budget: indicates project costs

Authorization: asks for approval to proceed

Informal Proposals: Six Parts

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 7

formal proposals
Formal proposals include all the basic parts of informal proposals but may have additional parts.Formal Proposals

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 8

formal proposals1
Possible additional parts:

Copy of RFP

Letter or memo of transmittal

Abstract and/or executive summary

Title page

Table of contents

List of figures

Appendix

Formal Proposals

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 9

parts of formal and informal proposals
Parts of Formal and Informal Proposals

Appendix

Authorization

Budget

Staffing

Schedule

Background, problem, purpose

Introduction

List of figures

Table of contents

Title Page

Abstract or summary

Letter of transmittal

Copy of RFP (optional)

Generally appear in both

formal and informal proposals:

Optional in informal proposals:

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 10

understanding business reports
Understanding Business Reports
  • Definition
  • Business Report
  • Product of thorough investigation and analysis
  • Presents vital information to decision makers in business, industry, government, and education

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 11

understanding business reports1
Understanding Business Reports

Report Writing Process

  • Prepare to write.
  • Research secondary data.
  • Generate primary data.
  • Document data.
  • Organize, outline, anddiscuss data.
  • Illustrate data.
  • Present final report.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 12

preparing to write
Preparing to Write
  • Define the purpose of the project.
  • Limit the scope of the report.
    • What constraints influence the range of your project?
    • How will you achieve your purpose?
    • How much time and space do you have?
    • How accessible is your data?
    • How thorough should your research be?

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 13

preparing to write1
Preparing to Write
  • Write a statement of purpose to describe the following:
    • Goal
    • Significance
    • Limitations
  • Use action verbs.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 14

statement of purpose
Statement of Purpose

The purpose of this report is to explore possible locations for expansion. The report will consider economic data, general costs, consumer demand, and local competition. This research is significant because for our company to survive, we must grow. This report won’t consider specific start-up costs or traffic patterns, which will require additional research.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 15

primary v secondary data
Primary v. Secondary Data

Primary Data: come from firsthand experience and observation

Secondary Data: come from reading what others have experienced or observed and written down

Nearly every research projectbegins with investigatingsecondary data.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 16

researching secondary data
Researching Secondary Data

Electronic Databases

Collections of information accessible by computer and digital searchable

Examples:

ABI/Inform

Factiva

LexisNexis

EBSCO

Print Resources

  • Books
  • Periodicals
  • Bibliographic indexes such as Reader’s Guide

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 17

researching secondary data1
Researching Secondary Data

The Web

Product/service information

Public relations materials

Mission statements

Staff directories

Press releases

Company news

Article reprints

Stock and financial data

Employment records

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 18

web search tips and techniques
Web Search Tips and Techniques

Use two or three search tools.

Know your search tool.

Understand case sensitivity in keyword searches.

Use nouns as search wordsand as many as eight wordsin a query.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 19

web search tips and techniques1
Web Search Tips and Techniques
  • Combine keywords into phrases.
  • Omit articles and prepositions.
  • Use wildcards.
  • Proofread your search words.
  • Save the best.
  • Keep trying.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 20

blogs and microblogs
Blogs and Microblogs
  • Used by business researchers, students, politicians, and the media to share and gather information
  • Can provide honest consumer feedback fast and inexpensively

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 21

social media
Social Media
  • Used by businesses to communicate with customers, generate customer feedback, provide information to customers, and market products and services
  • Inexpensive source ofdata and research

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 22

generating primary data

Experimenting

Surveying

Observing

Interviewing

Generating Primary Data

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 23

generating primary data1
Generating Primary Data
  • Surveying
  • Advantages:
    • Economical and efficient way to gather data
    • Ability to reach large audiences
    • Data collected tends to be accurate
  • Disadvantages:
    • Response rate is generally low
    • Responders may not represent general population
    • Some responses are not truthful

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 24

generating primary data2
Generating Primary Data
  • Interviewing
    • Locate an expert.
    • Prepare for the interview.
    • Maintain a professional attitude.
    • Ask objective, friendly questions.
    • Watch the time.
    • End graciously.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 25

generating primary data3
Generating Primary Data
  • Observing
  • Plan ahead.
  • Get necessary permissions.
  • Be objective.
  • Quantify observations.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 26

generating primary data4
Generating Primary Data
  • Experimenting
  • Develop rigorous research design.
  • Pay attention to matching experimental and control groups.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 27

documenting data
Documenting Data

Why document data?

  • To strengthen your argument
  • To instruct the reader
  • To project yourself againstcharges of plagiarism

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 28

documenting data1
Documenting Data

What to Document

  • Another person\'s ideas, opinions, examples, or theory
  • Any facts, statistics, and graphics that are not common knowledge
  • Quotations of another person\'s actual spoken or written words
  • Paraphrases of another person\'s spoken or written words

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 29

documenting data2
Documenting Data

How to Paraphrase

  • Read original material until you comprehend its full meaning.
  • Write your own version without looking at the original.
  • Avoid using grammatical structure of the original.
  • Reread to make sure you have covered all main points.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 30

documenting data3
Documenting Data

Using Citation Formats

  • Modern Language Association (MLA)
  • American Psychological Association (APA)

See Appendix A to learnhow to use these formats.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 31

slide32

Organizing Report Data

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 32

slide33

Organizing Report Data

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 33

outlining report data
The main points used to outline a report often become the main headings of the written report.

Major headingscentered and typed in bold font

Second-level headingsstart at the left margin

Third-level headingsindented, becoming part of the paragraph

Outlining Report Data

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 34

illustrating report data
Illustrating Report Data

Why use visual aids?

  • To clarify data
  • To create visual interest
  • To make numerical data meaningful
  • To make information more understandable and easierto remember

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 35

illustrating report data1
Illustrating Report Data

Most common types of visual aids

  • Tables
  • Charts
  • Graphs
  • Photographs

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 36

slide37
Table

To show exact figures and values

Matching Visuals With Objectives

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 37

slide38
Bar Chart

To compare one item with others

Matching Visuals With Objectives

2009

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 38

slide39
Line Chart

To demonstrate changes in quantitative data over time

Matching Visuals With Objectives

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 39

slide40
Pie Chart

To visualize a whole unit and the proportions of its components

Matching Visuals With Objectives

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 40

slide41
Flowchart

To display a process or procedure

Matching Visuals With Objectives

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 41

slide42
Organization Chart

To define a hierarchy of elements or a set of relationships

Matching Visuals With Objectives

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 42

slide43
Photograph, Map, Illustration

To achieve authenticity, to spotlight a location, or to show an item in use

Matching Visuals With Objectives

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 43

incorporating graphics in reports
Incorporating Graphics in Reports
  • Evaluate the audience.
  • Use restraint.
  • Be honest and ethical.
  • Introduce a graphic meaningfully.
  • Choose an appropriate caption or title style.
  • Give credit to source if appropriate.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 44

presenting the final formal report
Presenting the Final Formal Report

Prefatory Parts

  • Title page
  • Letter or memo of transmittal
  • Table of contents
  • List of figures
  • Executive summary

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 45

presenting the final formal report1
Presenting the Final Formal Report

Body of Report

  • Introduction

Background

Problem or purpose

Significance and scope

Sources and methods

Organization

  • Discussion of findings
  • Summary, conclusions, recommendations

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 46

presenting the final formal report2
Presenting the Final Formal Report

Supplementary Parts of a Formal Report

  • Footnotes or endnotes
  • Works Cited, References, or Bibliography
  • Appendix

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 47

parts of formal reports
Parts of Formal Reports

Bibliography

Appendix

Recommendations

Conclusions

Body

Introduction

Executive summary

List of figures

Table of contents

Letter of transmittal

Title page

Cover

Generally appear in both

formal and informal reports:

Optional in informal reports:

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 48

slide49
“Success seems to be connected with action. Successful people keep moving. They make mistakes, but they don\'t quit.”

--Conrad HiltonAmerican hotelier

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Essentials of Business Communication, 9th Edition

Chapter 10, Slide 49

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