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STRUCTURED LOGIC DESIGN WITH VHDL. Author: Nikola Jevtović Computer Science Department School of Electrical Engineering University of Belgrade email: jevtovic.nikola @ gmail.com. Reference:. “Structured Logic Design With VHDL” James R. Armstrong, F. Gail Gray Virginia Tech. Chapter 1.

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Structured logic design with vhdl

STRUCTURED LOGIC DESIGN WITH VHDL

Author: Nikola Jevtović Computer Science DepartmentSchool of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of Belgradeemail: [email protected]


Reference

Reference:

“Structured Logic Design With VHDL”

James R. Armstrong, F. Gail GrayVirginia Tech

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Chapter 1

Chapter 1

Structured Design Concepts

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Structured design concepts

Structured Design Concepts

The abstraction hierarchy can be expressed in two domains:

  • Structural domain: A domain in which a component is described in terms of interconnection of more primitive components.

  • Behavioral domain: A domain in which a component is described by defining its I/O response.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Structured design concepts1

Structured Design Concepts

  • Level of detail commonly used in design

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Structured design concepts2

Structured Design Concepts

Silicon level

Circuit level

Gate level

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Structured design concepts3

Structured Design Concepts

Register level

Chip level

System level

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Structured design concepts4

Structured Design Concepts

  • Textual vs. Pictorial Representations

    Example of pictorial representations of logical circuits

State Table

State Assignment

…also timing diagrams and/or truth tables (K-maps).

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Structured design concepts5

Structured Design Concepts

  • Textual vs. Pictorial Representations

    Common textual methods are:

  • natural language (e.g. English),

  • equations (Boolean or differential) and

  • computer languages (hardware description language -HDL)

Text is better for representing complex behavior; pictures are better for illustrating interrelationships.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Structured design concepts6

Structured Design Concepts

  • Types of behavioral descriptions

    • Algorithmic : the procedure defining the I/O response is not meant to imply any particular physical implementation.

    • Data flow : the data dependencies in the description match those in real implementation.

Both are HDL implementations of behavior at the register and chip levels.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Structured design concepts7

Structured Design Concepts

  • Design process

Logic synthesis

Natural language (System level)

Logic (Gate level)

Natural language synthesis

Algorithmic (Chip level)

Circuit (Circuit level)

Layout synthesis

Algorithmic synthesis

Data Flow (Register level)

Geometrical Shapes (Layout level)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Structured design concepts8

Structured Design Concepts

  • Structural design decomposition

Bottom-up design

Top-down design

Partial tree design

Full tree design

Behavioral modeling

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Chapter 2

Chapter 2

Design Tools

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Design tools

Design Tools

  • Editors (textual or graphic)

  • Simulators (stochastic or deterministic)

  • Checkers and Analyzers

  • Optimizers and Synthesizers

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Design tools1

Design Tools

  • Schematic editor: An editor which can be used to create and display an interconnected set of graphic tokens.

  • It has following features:

  • A library of primitive symbols.

  • A system of graphic windows (used to create an interconnect of graphic tokens).

  • Commands for creating wirelists.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Design tools2

R

D

CLK

D

Q

D Q

Q

CLK

R

R

Graphical representation

Digital device

Design Tools

  • Simulator: A program which models the response of a system stimuli.

  • Process: A computational entity which models the function and delay of the digital device.

process (CLK,R)

begin

if R=‘0’

then Q <= ‘0’;

elsif

CLK’EVENT and CLK=‘1’

then Q <= D;

end if;

end process;

VHDL process

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Chapter 3

Chapter 3

Basic Features of VHDL

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl

A basic element of a VHDL description is the block.

architectureBLOCK_STRUCTURED

-----

----- -- Outer Block Declaration Section

begin

-----

----- -- Outer Block Executable Statements

A:block

---

--- -- Inner Block A Declaration Section

begin

---

--- -- Inner Block A Executable Statements

---

end blockA;

endBLOCK_STRUCTURED;

Basic Features of VHDL

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl1

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Lexical description

    Character Set:

  • Upper case letters: A … Z

  • Digits: 0 … 9

  • Special characters: “ # & ‘ ( ) * + , - . / : ; < = > _ |

  • Space character: (20)

  • Format effectors:

    • Carriage return: (0D)

    • Line feed: (0A)

    • Form feed: (0C)

    • Horizontal tabulation: (09)

    • Vertical tabulation: (0B)

  • Lower case letters: a… z

  • Other special characters: ! $ % @ ? [ \ ] ^ ` { } ~

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl2

Delimiters –characters that are used to separate lexical elements and have specific meanings in the language:

& ‘ ( ) * + , - . / : ; < = > |

Compound delimiteris a sequence of two delimiters that have special meanings:

=> ** := /= >= <= <> --

Basic Features of VHDL

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl3

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Reserved words

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl4

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Classification of Data Types:

  • Scalar (their values are single entities)

    • Enumeration – discrete

    • Integer – discrete, numeric

    • Physical – numeric

    • Floating point (or real – numeric)

  • Composite (their values are complex objects)

    • Array – all elements have the same type

    • Record – elements may have different types

  • Access (provide access to other types)

  • File (provide access to other files)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl5

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Classes of Objects

  • Constant– An object whose value is specified at compile and cannot be changed during simulation.

  • Variable– A data object whose current value can be changed by VHDL statements.

  • Signal– A data object that has a time dimension. Using waveforms, future values can be assigned without affecting the current value.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl6

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Declaration of Data Objects

  • Declaration of Constants

    constantconst_name:type_name:=const_value;

  • Declaration of Variables

    variablevar_name:type_name:=init_value;

  • Declaration of Signals

    signalsig_name:type_name:=init_value;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl7

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Assignment Statements

  • A Variable Assignment Statement

    A variable instantaneously replace its current value by a new value:

    var_name:=new_var_value;

  • A Signal Assignment Statement

    A new value of a signal is scheduled to occur at some future time. The current value is never changed:

    sig_name<=‘sig_value’ afterint_valuens;

    If not specified, the default value of time is delta time (infinitesimally small value of time in the future).

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl8

priority

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Operators in VHDL

  • Logical: and or nand nor xor

  • Relational: = /= < <= > =>

  • Adding: + - &

  • Signing: + -

  • Multiplying: * / mod rem

  • Miscellaneous: ** abs not

lowest

highest

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl9

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Sequential Control Statements

  • Wait statement

    wait onobjectuntilexpressionforintns;

    wait on X,Y until Z=0 for 100ns;

    wait for 100ns;

    wait on A,B,C;

    wait on A,B,C for 100ns;

    wait until Z=0;

    wait on X,Y until Z=0;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl10

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Sequential Control Statements

  • If Statement

    if{condition1}then

    {sequence_of_statements_1}

    elsif{condition2}then

    {sequence_of_statements_2}

    else{sequence_of_statements_n}

    end if;

if A < 0 then

LEVEL := 1;

elsif A > 10 then

LEVEL := 3;

else LEVEL := 2;

end if;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl11

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Sequential Control Statements

  • Case Statement

    case{expression}is

    when{choices_1} =>{sequence_of_statements_1}

    when{choices_2}=>{sequence_of_statements_2}

    when others =>{sequence_of_statements_n}

    end case;

case A+B is

when 0 => X <= “ZERO”;

when (1 to 20)=> X <= “POSITIVE”;

when others=> X <= “NEGATIVE”;

end case;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl12

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Sequential Control Statements

  • Loop Statement

-- FOR loop

forNAMEin{range}loop

{sequence_of_statements}

end loop;

for I in 1 to 10 loop

A(I) := A(I) + 1;

end loop;

-- WHILE loop

while{condition}loop

{sequence_of_statements}

end loop;

while A<B loop

A := A=1;

end loop;

-- Simple loop

loop

{sequence_of_statements}

end loop;

loop

compute (x);

exit when x<10;

end loop;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl13

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Sequential Control Statements

  • Next Statement

    next{loop_label} [whencondition]

  • Exit Statement

    exit{loop_label} [whencondition]

  • Null Statement

    Does nothing, but it’s mandatory in “case” statements if no action is desired for certain choices – because all choices must be covered!

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl14

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Concurrent Statements

  • -NOT executed in the order written; only when signal that affect the value computed by the statement changes;

  • -Plus, executed onceat the beginning of simulation;

  • Some statement types are both concurrent and sequential;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl15

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Concurrent Statements

  • Process Statement

LABEL:process(sensitivity_signal_list){constant_declarations}{var_declarations}begin{sequential_statements}end processLABEL;

LABEL:

(sensitivity_signal_list)

  • Fundamental statement type;

  • All other concurrent statements can be written as processes;

  • Label and sensitivity list are optional;

  • Executed once at the beginning of simulation and when any signal in sensitivity list changes;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl16

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Concurrent Statements

  • Process Statement

  • If there is no sensitivity list, process will execute once at the beginning of the simulation and thereafterwhenever any signal in wait statement changes;

  • There must be a wait statement to prevent an infinite loop.

NO_LIST:process{constant_declarations} {var_declarations}begin{sequential_statements}wait on S1, S2end processNO_LIST;

wait on S1, S2

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl17

equal

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Concurrent Statements

  • Concurrent Assert Statement

If BOOL_EXPR is false thenMessage_string is written to the output device.

LABEL:assertBOOL_EXPR

report“Message_string”

severitySEVERITY_LEVEL;

LABEL: process (A, B, C) begin assert (A or B) = C report ”...” severity WARNING; end process LABEL;

LABEL: assert (A or B)=Creport “C is NOT equal to (A or B)”severity WARNING;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl18

equal

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Concurrent Statements

  • Concurrent Signal Assignment Statement

  • Executed:

  • once at the beginning of the simulation;

  • at any time any right side signal experiences an event.

LABEL: C <= A or B;

LABEL: process (A, B) begin C <= A or B; end process LABEL;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl19

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Concurrent Statements

  • Concurrent Signal Assignment Statement

    can be conditional.

  • Executed:

  • once at the beginning of the simulation;

  • when any signal in any WAVFRM or any signal in any COND experiences an event.

LABEL:SIGNAL_NAME<=[transport]

WAVFRM1whenCOND1else

WAVFRM2whenCOND2else

...

WAVFRMnwhenCONDnelse

WAVFRMq;

L1: S <= A or B when XX=1

else A and B when XX=2

else A xor B;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl20

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Functions

    can be declared by specifying:

  • the name of the function;

  • the input parameters (if any);

  • the type of the returned value;

  • any declarations required by the function itself;

  • an algorithm for the computation of the returned value.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl21

Basic Features of VHDL

begin

process (START,SYNC)

variable CNT: INTEGER :=0;

begin

if START’EVENT and START=‘1’ then

CNT := 2**N-1;

end if;

PGOUT <= INT_TO_BIN (CNT,N) after PER;

if CNT /= -1 and START = ‘1’ then

SYNC <= not SYNC after PER;

CNT := CNT-1;

end if;

end process;

end ALG;

entity PULSE_GEN is

generic (N: INTEGER; PER: TIME);

port (START: in BIT;

PGOUT: out BIT_VECTOR(N-1 downto 0);

SYNC: inout BIT);

end PULSE_GEN;

architecture ALG of PULSE_GEN is

function INT_TO_BIN

(INPUT: INTEGER; N: POSITIVE)

return BIT_VECTOR is

variable FOUT: BIT_VECTOR(0 to N-1);

variable TEMP_A: INTEGER:=0;

variable TEMP_B: INTEGER:=0;

begin

TEMP_A:= INPUT;

for I in N-1 downto 0 loop

TEMP_B:= TEMP_A/(2**I);

TEMP_A:= TEMP_A rem (2**I);

if (TEMP_B = 1) then

FOUT(N-1-I) := ‘1’; else

FOUT(N-1-I) := ‘0’;

end if;

end loop;

return FOUT;

end INT_TO_BIN;

Function to convert an INTEGER type to type BIT_VECTOR

(fig. 3.25)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl22

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Procedures

    can be declared by specifying:

  • the name of the procedure;

  • the input and output parameters;

  • any declarations required by the procedure itself;

  • an algorithm.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl23

Basic Features of VHDL

procedure ADD (A,B: in BIT_VECTOR; CIN: in BIT;

SUM: out BIT_VECTOR; COUT: out BIT) is

variable SUMV,AV,BV: BIT_VECTOR (A’LENGTH-1 downto 0);

variable CARRY: BIT;

begin

AV := A;

BV := B;

CARRY := CIN;

for I in 0 to SUMV’HIGH loop

SUMV(I) := AV(I) xor BV(I) xor CARRY;

CARRY := (AV(I) and BV(I)) or (AV(I) and CARRY) or (BV(I) and CARRY);

end loop;

COUT := CARRY;

SUM := SUMV;

end ADD;

Procedure to add entities of type BIT_VECTOR

(fig. 3.26)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl24

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Subprogram Usage Rules

  • For procedures:

  • modes for parameters : in, out, inout ;

  • object classes for parameters : constant, variable, signal ;

  • if the mode is in and no object class is specified, constant is assumed;

  • if the mode is inout or out and if no object class is specified, variable is assumed.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl25

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Subprogram Usage Rules

  • For functions:

  • the only allowable mode for parameters is in ;

  • the only allowable object classes are constant or signal ;

  • if the object class is not specified, constant is assumed.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl26

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Packages

  • Use them to hold frequently used declarations;

  • VHDL defines a STANDARD package;

  • Visible by referring to the package name;

  • Package body is not required if a package contains no subprograms;

  • Access to the package is given by the use clause.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl27

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Packages

  • Definition of a package:

    package HANDY is subtype BITVECT3 is BIT_VECTOR(0 to 2); function MAJ3 (X: BIT) return BIT;end HANDY;

  • Entity LOGSYS “sees” all the declarations from HANDY package:

    use work.HANDY.all;entity LOGSYS is port (X: in BITVECT3);end LOGSYS;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl28

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Visibility

  • Region: A logical continuous portion of a text.

  • Declaration region: A region in which a name can be used to unambiguously refer to a declared entity.

  • Once an entity has been declared in the declaration region, its name is visible to the end of that region.

  • Two types of visibility:

    • directly, within the region where entity is declared;

    • by selection, through use and library clauses.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl29

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Libraries

  • When VHDL models are analyzed with no errors, the result is stored in a library.

  • Libraries allow the existing VHDL models to be used in future VHDL descriptions

  • Two types of libraries:

    • work library, where current analysis results are stored

    • resource libraries, referenced during analysis and simulation but cannot be written into

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl30

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Libraries

  • contain primary and secondary units.

  • Primary units are:

  • entity;

  • package;

  • configuration declarations.

  • Secondary units are:

  • architectures;

  • package bodies.

  • they have logical and physical names.

  • Logical name is:

  • used in VHDL description;

  • portable.

  • Physical name is:

  • used by the host OS to refer to the library;

  • -system dependent.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl31

VHDL Structural Model

model pointers

library models

Design Library

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Configurations

  • VHDL structural architectures are developed by specifying the interconnect between component models that are first declared and then instantiated;

  • Each instantiated component must be bound to a component model if it is to be simulated.

Configuration specification statement:

forINSTANTIATED_COMPONENT

useLIBRARY_COMPONENT;

(fig. 3.29)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl32

entity TWO_CONSECUTIVE is

port (CLK,R,X: in BIT;Z: out BIT);

end TWO_CONSECUTIVE;

use work.all;

architecture STRUCTURAL of TWO_CONSECUTIVE is

signal Y0,Y1,A0,A1: BIT:=‘0’;

signal NY0,NX: BIT:=‘1’;

component EDGE_TRIGGERED_D

port (CLK,D,NCLR: in BIT;Q,QN: out BIT);

end component;

for all: EDGE_TRIGGERED_D

use entity EDGE_TRIG_D (BEHAVIOR);

component INVG

port (I: in BIT; O: out BIT);

end component;

for all: INVG use entity INV (BEHAVIOR);

component AND3G

port (I1,I2,I3: in BIT;O: out BIT);

end component;

for all: AND3G use entity AND3(BEHAVIOR);

component OR2G

port (i1,I2: in BIT;O: out BIT);

end component;

for all: OR2G use entity (OR2(BEHAVIOR):

begin

C1: EDGE_TRIGGERED_D port map (CLK,X,R,Y0,NY0);

C2: EDGE_TRIGGERED_D port map(CLK,ONE,R,Y1,open);

C3: INVG port map (X,NX);

C4: AND3G port map (X,Y0,Y1,A0);

C5: AND3G port map (NY0,Y1,NX,A1);

C6: OR2G port map (A0,A1,Z);

end STRUCTURAL;

Basic Features of VHDL

Configuration specification for entity TWO_CONSECUTIVE

(fig. 3.30)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl33

Basic Features of VHDL

  • Configurations

  • Another approach to binding components is through the use of component declarations.

  • Remove all configuration specification statements (model pointers) from architecture and collect them in a configuration declaration.

configuration PARTS of TWO_CONSECUTIVE is

for STRUCTURAL

for all: EDGE_TRIGGERED_D

use entity work.EDGE_TRIG_D(BEHAVIOR);

end for;

for all: INVG

use entity work.INV(BEHAVIOR);

end for;

for all: AND3G

use entity work.AND3(BEHAVIOR);

end for;

for all: OR2G

use entity work.OR2(BEHAVIOR);

end for;

end for;

end PARTS;

(fig.3.31)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl34

Basic Features of VHDL

  • File I/O

  • Crucial requirement in VHDL is driving a model with test vectors.

  • Related problems:

    • initialize memories from external file;

    • write simulation results to external file.

  • Two types of files in VHDL:

    • formatted;

    • text.

  • Files can be of mode in or out, but not inout !

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl35

output file

input file

Basic Features of VHDL

– formatted type –

  • File I/O

  • Two declarations are required:

    • a file type declaration;

    • a declaration of the file itself.

  • You cannot write to and read from the same host file during a given simulation – either in or out !

type INP_COMB is file of BIT_VECTOR;

file OUTVECT: INP_COMB is out “TEST.VEC”;WRITE (OUTVECT: out INP_COMB;

V: in BIT_VECTOR);

file INVECT: INP_COMB is in “TEST.VEC”;loopexit when ENDFILE (INVECT);READ (INVECT, V, LENGTH);end loop;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic features of vhdl36

Basic Features of VHDL

– text type –

  • File I/O

  • Unlike formatted files, text files are human readable.

  • Create them by a text editor or some programming language output.

  • You must use TEXTIO package which begins with:

    type LINE is access STRING; -- points to memory locations

    type TEXT is file of STRING; --input data in the host file

  • For e.g.:

    file INVECT: TEXT is “TVECT.TEXT”; --declaration of TEXT file

    READLINE (INVECT,VLINE); --reading a single line from file

    READ (VLINE,V); -- reading single bit vector from line

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Chapter 4

Chapter 4

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Propagation Delay

  • Electronic signals must obey the laws of physics!

  • There is always a finite delay between the time that a gate input changes value and the time that a gate output changes.

  • The notation <= indicates a signal change that will occur after a propagation delay.

  • The notation := indicates instantaneous variable assignment.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques1

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Propagation Delay

Delayed signal assignment

AS <= X*Y after 2ns;

BS <= AS+Z after 2ns;

Instantaneous variable assignment

AV := X*Y;

BV := AV+Z;

(fig. 4.1)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques2

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

entity STATEMENTS is

port (X,Y,Z: in INTEGER; B: out INTEGER);

end STATEMENTS; -- note: entity ports are always signals

architecture PROP_DELAY of STATEMENTS is

signal AS: INTEGER;

begin

process (X,Y,Z)

begin

AS <= X*Y after 2ns;

B <= AS+Z after 2ns;

end process;

end PROP_DELAY;

architecture INSTANTANEOUS of STATEMENTS is

begin

process (X,Y,Z)

variable AV,BV: INTEGER;

begin

AV := X*Y;

BV := AV+Z;

B <= BV;

end process;

end INSTANTANEOUS;

  • Propagation Delay

Complete code for instantaneous and delayed assignment statements

(fig. 4.2)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques3

Input

Set 1

Logic Block 3

Z1

Logic Block 1

Output

Input

Set 2

Z2

Logic Block 2

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Delay and Concurrency

  • Logic signals flow in parallel.

  • Logic blocks 1 and 2 are activated simultaneously.

  • Logic block 3 is activated as soon as Z1 or Z2 changes.

(fig. 4.3)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques4

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Delay and Concurrency

  • Default propagation time is called delta delay.

  • Delta is greater than zero but smaller then any other positive time.

  • Example: two statements with delta delayAS <= X*Y; BS <= AS+Z;

(fig. 4.5)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques5

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Sequential and Concurrent Statements

  • Two simple rules to determine type of statements:

  • concurrent – if they are within architecture;

  • sequential – if they are within process or subprogram.

entity STATEMENTS is

port (X,Y,Z:in INTEGER; BS:out INTEGER);

end STATEMENTS;

architecture SEQUENTIAL of STATEMENTS is

begin

process( X,Y,Z)

variable AV,BV: INTEGER;

begin

AV := X*Y;

BV := AV+Z;

BS <= BV;

end process;

end SEQUENTIAL;

architecture CONCURRENT of STATEMENTS is

signal AS: INTEGER;

begin

AS <= X*Y;

BS <= AS+Z;

end CONCURRENT;

(fig. 4.6)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques6

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Implementation of Time Delay in Simulator

  • Time delay can be specified in two ways:

  • Y <= X; -- delta delay

  • Y <= X after 10 ns; -- standard time until delay.

  • During simulation the elapsed time in standard time units is called simulation time.

  • There may be many simulation cycles associated with the same simulation time!

  • No number of delta delays added together can cause simulation time to advance.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques7

X

t=1ns

t=4ns

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Implementation of Time Delay in Simulator

entity BUFF is

port (X: in BIT; Z: out BIT);

end BUFF;

architecture ONE of BUFF is

begin

process (X)

variable Y1: BIT;

begin

Y1 := X;

Z <= Y1 after 1ns;

end process;

end ONE;

architecture THREE of BUFF is

signal Y3: BIT;

begin

Y3 := X;

Z <= Y3 after 1ns;

end THREE;

architecture FOUR of BUFF is

signal Y4: BIT;

begin

Y4 <= X after 1ns;

Z <= Y4 after 1ns;

end FOUR;

architecture TWO of BUFF is

signal Y2: BIT;

begin

Y2 := X;

Z <= Y2;

end TWO;

(fig. 4.8)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques8

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Implementation of Time Delay in Simulator

(fig. 4.9)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques9

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Implementation of Time Delay in Simulator

architecture FIVE of BUFF is

signal Y5: BIT;

begin

process (X)

begin

Y5 <= X;

Z <= Y5;

end process;

end FIVE;

architecture FIVE_A of BUFF is

signal Y5: BIT;

begin

process (X,Y5)

begin

Y5 <= X;

Z <= Y5;

end process;

end FIVE_A;

(fig. 4.10)

(fig. 4.11)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques10

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Inertial and Transport Delay

  • Example:Z <= I after 10 ns; --inertial delayZ <= transport I after 10ns; --transport delay

  • Inertial delay: the signal propagation will take place if and only if an input persists at a given level for a specified amount of time.

  • Transport delay: all changes of a signal will propagate regardless of how long changes stay at the new level.

    Inertial delay mechanism filters out

    inputs that change too rapidly.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques11

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • The VHDL Scheduling Algorithm

  • Two concepts that implement delay are transactions and waveforms.

  • Transaction is a pair consisting of a value and time:

    • value is the future value of signal driver;

    • time is the time at which the value becomes the current value of the driver.

  • Waveform - a series of transactions ordered by time.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques12

process A

DaZ

Z

I;

F

process B

DbZ

Z

J;

transaction

CV

10ns

15ns

22ns

31ns

42ns

Z

DaZ

0

1

0

1

0

1

waveform

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • The VHDL Scheduling Algorithm

Example:

- signal Z is driven from two processes

- DaZ and DbZ are drivers

- F is resolution function

(fig. 4.12)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques13

1

2

3

Z

I after 10ns

1

2

I

I

t=16

t=10

t=0

t=5

t=0

10ns

10ns

1) Z

1) Z

0

0

1

1

10ns

15ns

0

1

2) Z

2) Z

transport

1

0

26ns

15ns

3) Z

1

3) Z

0

inertial

0

0

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • The VHDL Scheduling Algorithm

(fig. 4.14)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques14

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • The VHDL Scheduling Algorithm

  • Inertial delay has side effects, for e.g.:

    process begin Z <= ‘1’ after 50 ns; Z <= ‘0’ after 100 ns; wait; end process;

  • If the initial value of Z is 0, the inertial delay rule will eliminate the (50ns, 1) transaction. There are two solutions:

process begin Z <= transport ‘1’ after 50 ns; Z <= transport ‘0’ after 100 ns; wait;end process;

process begin Z <= ‘1’ after 50 ns,

‘0’ after 100 ns; wait;end process;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques15

DEL

Z

X

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Modeling Combinational and Sequential Logic

Basic Combinational Logic

process (X) --declare process variables variable ZVAR: BIT; begin --represent circuit functionality

--compute ZVAR Z <= ZVAR after DEL; --model circuit delayend process;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques16

DEL

Z

X

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Modeling Combinational and Sequential Logic

Basic Sequential Logic

Y

process (X) --declare process variables variable YVAR, ZVAR: BIT; begin --represent circuit functionality

--compute ZVAR Y <= YVAR after DEL; --state variable delay Z <= ZVAR after DEL; --output delayend process;

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques17

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Combinational Logic

  • Gates

  • Buffers

  • Adders

  • Multiplexers

  • Decoders

  • Encoders

  • Shifters

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques18

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Combinational Logic

  • Gate Primitive

entity AND2 is

generic (DEL: TIME);

port (I1,I2: in BIT; O: out BIT);

end AND2;

architecture DF of AND2 is

begin

) <= I1 and I2 after DEL;

end DF;

(fig. 4.18)

  • The most basic of the combinational logic primitives

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques19

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Combinational Logic

  • Buffer Primitive

entity BUF is

generic (DATA_DEL, Z_DEL: TIME);

port (I,EN: in BIT; O: out BIT);

end BUF;

architecture ALG of BUF is

begin

process (I,EN)

begin

if EN = ‘1’ then

O <= I after DATA_DEL;

else

O <= ‘1’ after Z_DEL;

end if;

end process;

end ALG;

  • Copy input I to output O when E=1.

  • If E=0 then O will go to a high impedance condition. (in this case, highZ=1)

(fig. 4.19)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques20

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Combinational Logic

  • Adder Primitive

entity FULL_ADDER is

generic (SUM_DEL,CARRY_DEL:TIME);

port (A,B,CI: in BIT; SUM,COUT: out BIT);

end FULL_ADDER;

architecture DF of FULL_ADDER is

begin

SUM <= A xor B xor CI after SUM_DEL;

COUT<= (A and B) or (A and CI) or (B and CI) after CARRY_DEL;

end DF;

  • Full 1-bit adder

  • Inputs: two data bits and carry

  • Outputs: sum and carry

(fig. 4.20)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques21

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Combinational Logic

  • Multiplexer Primitive

entity FOUR_TO_1_MUX is

generic (DEL: TIME);

port (IN0,IN1,IN2,IN3: in BIT_VECTOR (3 downto 0);

SEL: in BIT_VECTOR (1 downto 0);

O: out BIT_VECTOR (3 downto 0));

end FOUR_TO_1_MUX;

architecture DF of FOUR_TO_1_MUX is

begin

O <= IN0 after DEL when SEL = “00” else

IN1 after DEL when SEL = “01” else

IN2 after DEL when SEL = “10” else

IN3 after DEL;

end DF;

(fig. 4.22)

  • Multiplexer is a selector from a number of data sources.

  • Generally, 2ⁿ to 1 multiplexer. In this case: n=4 .

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques22

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Combinational Logic

  • Decoder Primitive

entity TWO_TO_4_DEC is

generic (DEL: TIME);

port (I: BIT_VECTOR (1 downto 0);

O: out BIT_VECTOR (3 downto 0));

end TWO_TO_4_DEC;

architecture ALG of TWO_TO_4_DEC is

begin

process (I)

begin

case I is

when “00” => O<= “0001” after DEL;

when “01” => O<= “0010” after DEL;

when “10” => O<= “0100” after DEL;

when “11” => O<= “1000” after DEL;

end case;

end process;

end ALG;

  • N-bit input activates one of 2ⁿ outputs.

  • Decoder functions as a binary to decimal converter

(fig. 4.23)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques23

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Combinational Logic

  • Encoder Primitive

entity FOUR_TO_2_ENC is

generic (DEL: TIME);

port (I: BIT_VECTOR (3 downto);

O: out BIT_VECTOR (1 downto 0));

end FOUR_TO_2_ENC;

architecture FOUR_TO_2_ENC is

begin

O <= “00” after DEL when I(0) = ‘1’ else

“01” after DEL when I(1) = ‘1’ else

“10” after DEL when I(2) = ‘1’ else

“11” after DEL;

end DF;

(fig. 4.24)

  • Encoders perform inverse function of decoders.

  • Priority ranking is necessary for the inputs.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques24

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Combinational Logic

  • Shifter Primitive

entity SHIFTER is

generic (DEL: TIME);

port (DATA_IN: in BIT_VECTOR (3 downto 0);

SR,SL: in BIT; IL,IR: in BIT;

DATA_OUT: out BIT_VECTOR (3 downto 0));

end SHIFTER;

architecture ALG of SHIFTER is

begin

process (SR,SL,DATA_IN,IL,IR)

variable CON: BIT_VECTOR (0 to 1);

begin

CON := SR&SL;

case CON is

when “00” => DATA_OUT <= DATA_IN after DEL;

when “01” => DATA_OUT <= DATA_IN(2 downto 0)& IL after DEL;

when “10” => DATA_OUT <= IR & DATA_IN(3 downto1) after DEL;

when “11” => DATA_OUT <= DATA_IN after DEL;

end case;

end process;

end ALG;

  • Shift right is division by 2, shift left is multiplication by 2.

(fig. 4.25)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques25

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Combinational Logic

  • The Data Operations Package

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques26

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques27

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques28

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Sequential Logic

  • Flip-flops

  • Registers

  • Latches

  • Counters

  • Memories

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques29

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Sequential Logic

- Flip-flop Primitives

entity JKFF is

generic (SRDEL, CLKDEL: TIME);

port (S,R,J,K,CLK: in BIT;

Q,QN: inout BIT);

end JKFF;

architecture ALG of JKFF is

begin

process (CLK,S,R)

begin

if S =‘1’ and R =‘0’ then

Q <=‘1’ after SRDEL;

QN<=‘0’ after SRDEL;

elsif S=‘0’ and R=‘1’ then

Q <=‘0’ after SRDEL;

QN<=‘1’ after SRDEL;

elsif CLK’EVENT and CLK=‘1’

and S=‘0’ and R=‘0’ then

if J=‘1’ and K=‘0’ then

Q <=‘1’ after CLKDEL;

QN<=‘0’ after CLKDEL;

elsif J=‘0’ and K=‘1’ then

Q <=‘0’ after CLKDEL;

QN<=‘1’ after CLKDEL;

elsif J=‘1’ and K=‘1’ then

Q <= not Q after CLKDEL;

QN<= not QN after CLKDEL;

end if;

end if;

end process;

end ALG;

JK flip-flop model

(fig. 4.32)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques30

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Sequential Logic

- Register Primitives

entity REG is

generic (DEL: TIME);

port (RESET,LOAD,CLK: in BIT;

DATA_IN: in BIT_VECTOR(3 downto 0);

Q: inout BIT_VECTOR(3 downto 0));

end REG;

architecture DF of REG is

begin

REG: block (not CLK’STABLE and CLK=‘1’)

begin

Q <= guarded “0000” after DEL when RESET = ‘1’ else

DATA_IN after DEL when LOAD = ‘1’ else

Q;

end block REG;

end DF;

  • Use registers to store data words.

  • In our model both reset and load functions are synchronous but reset is having priority.

(fig. 4.33)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques31

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Sequential Logic

- Latch Primitives

entity LATCH is

generic (LATCH_DEL:TIME);

port (D: in BIT_VECTOR (7 downto 0); CLK: in BIT;

LOUT: out BIT_VECTOR(7 downto 0));

end LATCH;

architecture DFLOW of LATCH is

begin

LATCH: block (CLK = ‘1’)

begin

LOUT <= guarded D after LATCH_DEL;

end block LATCH;

end DFLOW;

  • CLK=‘1’ the output follows the input.

  • CLK=‘0’ the output stores value.

(fig. 4.34)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques32

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Sequential Logic

- Shift Register Primitive

entity SHIFTREG is

generic (DEL:TIME);

port (DATA_IN: in BIT_VECTOR (3 downto 0);

CLK,LOAD,SR,SL: in BIT; IL,IR: in BIT;

Q: inout BIT_VECTOR (3 downto 0));

end SHIFTREG;

architecture DF of SHIFTREG is

begin

SH: block (not CLK’STABLE and CLK=‘1’)

begin

Q<=guarded DATA_IN after DEL when LOAD=‘1’ else

Q(2 downto 0) & IL after DEL when SL=‘1’ and SR=‘0’ else

IR & Q(3 downto 1) after DEL when SL=‘0’ and SR=‘1’ else

Q;

end block SH;

end DF;

  • Shift register is sequential, shifter is combinational!

(fig. 4.36)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques33

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Sequential Logic

- Counter Primitive

entity COUNTER is

generic (DEL:TIME);

port (RESET,LOAD,COUNT,UP,CLK: in BIT;DATA_IN: in BIT_VECTOR(3 downto 0);

CNT: inout BIT_VECTOR(3 downto 0));

end COUNTER;

use work.PRIMS.all;

architecture ALG of COUNTE is

begin

process (CLK)

begin

if CLK = ‘1’ then

if RESET = ‘1’ then CNT<= “0000” after DEL;

elsif LOAD = ‘1’ then CNT<= DATA_IN after DEL;

elsif COUNT = ‘1’ then

if UP = ‘1’ then CNT <= INC(CNT) after DEL;

else CNT <= DEC(CNT) after DEL;

end if;

end if;

end if;

end process;

end ALG;

(fig. 4.37)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques34

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Sequential Logic

- Oscillator Primitive

entity CLOCK_GENERATOR

generic (PER:TIME);

port (RUN: in BIT; CLK: out BIT);

end CLOCK_GENERATOR;

architecture ALG of CLOCK_GENERATOR is

signal CLOCK:BIT;

begin

process (RUN,CLOCK)

variable CLKE: BIT:=‘0’;

begin

if RUN=‘1’ and not RUN’STABLE then CLKE := ‘1’;

CLOCK <= transport ‘0’ after PER/2;

CLOCK <= transport ‘1’ after PER;

end if;

if RUN=‘0’ and not RUN’STABLE then CLKE:=‘0’;

end if;

if CLOCK=‘1’ and not CLOCK’STABLE and CLKE=‘1’ then

CLOCK <= transport ‘0’ after PER/2;

CLOCK <= transport ‘1’ after PER;

end if;

CLK <= CLOCK;

end process;

end ALG

  • Necessary in any clocked sequential system.

  • Example: oscillator with feedback delay.

Feedback oscillator

(fig 4.39)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques35

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Sequential Logic - Oscillator Primitive

entity COSC is

generic (HI_TIME,LO_TIME: TIME);

port (RUN: in BIT; CLOCK: out BIT:= ‘0’);

end COSC;

architecture ALG of COSC is

begin

process

begin

wait until RUN=‘1’;

while RUN=‘1’ loop

CLOCK <= ‘1’;

wait for HI_TIME;

CLOCK <= ‘0’;

wait for LO_TIME;

end loop;

end process;

end ALG;

wait statement oscillator

(fig. 4.40)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques36

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Testing the Primitives

  • Two common requirements for testing models:

    • generation of clocks;

    • generation of input combinations.

  • Clock generation can be handled by oscillator primitives.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Basic vhdl modeling techniques37

Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

  • Testing the Primitives

entity PULSE_GEN is

generic (N:INTEGER; PER:TIME);

port (START: in BIT; PGOUT: out BIT_VECTOR(N-1 downto 0));

end PULSE_GEN;

architecture ALG of PULSE_GEN is

function INT_TO_BIN (INPUT: INTEGER; N: POSITIVE)

return BIT_VECTOR is

variable FOUT: BIT_VECTOR(0 to N-1);

variable TEMP_A: INTEGER:= 0;

variable TEMP_B: INTEGER:= 0;

begin

TEMP_A:= INPUT;

for I in N-1 downto 0 loop

TEMP_B:= TEMP_A/(2**I);

TEMP_A:= TEMP_A rem (2**I);

if (TEMP_B = 1)then

FOUT(N-1-I):= ‘1’ else

FOUT(N-1-I):= ‘0’;

end if;

end loop;

return FOUT;

end INT_TO_BIN;

begin

process (START)

begin

for I in 0 to 2**N-1 loop

PGOUT<= transport INT_TO_BIN(I,N)

after I*PER;

end loop;

end process;

end ALG;

Input combination generator

(fig. 4.42)

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


Literature

Literature:

“Structured Logic Design With VHDL”

James R. Armstrong, F. Gail Gray; Virginia Tech

  • Structured Design Concepts

    – entire chapter;

  • Design Tools

    – recommended general information on pages 18-25 ;

  • Basic Features of VHDL

    – recommended entire chapter (pages 44-112) with detailed examples and explanations;

  • Basic VHDL Modeling Techniques

    – pages 127-149 and 154-162.

Structured Logic Design with VHDL


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