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Aim: What are the skills needed by a successful history student? . DO NOW: What advice would you give your younger sibling to succeed in their first year of school ?. NY State Learning Standards 2 Common Core Standards RS 1, 6 and WS 2. I Studying Tips. II Cause and Effect.

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Aim what are the skills needed by a successful history student

Aim: What are the skills needed by a successful history student?

DO NOW:

What advice would you give your younger sibling to succeed in their first year of school?

NY State Learning Standards 2

Common Core Standards RS 1, 6 and WS 2


I studying tips
I Studying Tips student?


Ii cause and effect
II Cause and Effect student?

Historians need to be able to look at historical events and separate the causes from the effects. It’s not always easy! To help you figure it out, you can put the information into a “because” statement, and/or use a flow chart.

Example #1: All of the muppets who live on Sesame Street were very sad. Cookie Monster had eaten every last cookie. Burt and Ernie moved to California when all of the cookies had disappeared.

A “because” statement would look like this:

Because Cookie Monster ate all of the cookies, the residents of Sesame Street became sad, and Burt and Ernie had to move to California.

A flow chart would look like this:

The residents of Sesame Street became sad

Cookie monster ate all the cookies

Burt and Ernie moved to California


Cause and effect continued
Cause and Effect Continued… student?

Write a “because” statement, and draw a flow chart for Example #2: On July 20, 1969, astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first person to walk on the moon. The United States at this time had been competing with the former USSR in the “Space Race” during the Cold War. Perhaps more importantly, President John F. Kennedy promised in 1961 to send a man to the moon “not because it is easy, but because it is hard”.

Answer the following in your notebook:


Cause and effect continued1
Cause and Effect Continued… student?

Because of the Space Race, and President J.F.K’s call to go to the moon “because it is hard”, on July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong became the first person to walk on the moon.

Space Race

July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong became first person to walk on the moon.

JFK aimed to walk on the moon “because it is hard”.


Iii how to read political cartoons
III How to Read Political Cartoons student?

A) Political cartoons use humor and satire to get across a political viewpoint to the reader.

B) When analyzing a political cartoon, you should ask yourself the following:

1. What is the literalmeaning of the cartoon?

2. What is the figurative meaning of the cartoon?

3. What is the bias of the cartoonist?

Satire is the portrayal of a wrongdoing in a way where it becomes the object of ridicule.

When you read something literally, you take it at face value. In the case of a political cartoon, whatever you actually see is its literal meaning.

When you read something figuratively, you are looking for deeper meaning. In the case of a political cartoon, you do not take it at face value.

Bias is a preference for or against something.


How to read a political cartoon continued
How to Read a Political Cartoon Continued… student?

Answer the following in your notebook:

1. What is the literal meaning of the cartoon?

2. What is the figurative meaning of the cartoon?

3. What is the bias of the cartoonist?


Iv fact vs opinion
IV Fact vs. Opinion student?

A) A fact is TRUE information.

B) An opinion is a view or judgment.

C) Be careful; just because something is presented as fact, doesn’t make it true! How can you be sure? Do your research!

Should you always trust the news? Why or why not?


V compare and contrast
V Compare and Contrast student?

  • When you compare 2 or more things, you are looking for similarities

  • When you contrast 2 or more things, you are looking for differences

Recall when we compared and contrasted Taylor Swift and Miley Cyrus!

DIFFERENCES

DIFFERENCES

SIMILARITIES


Vi charts and graphs
VI Charts and Graphs student?

ALWAYS read the label, key or legend, and the sourcebefore you do anything else!

Source: Ms. Bugland and Ms. Schlesinger


Completed HW Assignments student? Over Three Months

Source: Ms. Bugland and Ms. Schlesinger

Who completed the most HW assignments over the 3 months?

Who completed the least?


What skills and or study habits do i need to work on the most this year
What skills and/or study habits do I need to work on the most this year?

*What steps do I need to take?


Key vocabulary
Key Vocabulary most this year?

Bias

Cause

Compare

Contrast

Effect

Fact

Figurative

Literal

Opinion

Satire


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