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Design, the Future & the Human Spirit Victor Margolin. Designers can work for the Public Good Designers ‘ responsibility to contribute in constructive way Ways designers can contribute ? Prescriptive Scenarios. Design for Socially Responsible Behavior Tromp, Kekkert , Verbeek.

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design the future the human spirit victor margolin
Design, the Future & the Human SpiritVictor Margolin
  • Designers can work for the Public Good
  • Designers ‘ responsibility to contribute in constructive way
  • Ways designers can contribute?
  • Prescriptive Scenarios
design for socially responsible behavior tromp kekkert verbeek
Design for Socially Responsible BehaviorTromp, Kekkert, Verbeek

Principle argument: Designers can facilitate

Individual concerns to align with Collective concerns

to act based on the larger Public Good

  • Intervention methods: Can change, User determines category

1. Coerce

2. Persuade

3. Seduce

4. Decisive

Strategies Based on Individual Concerns- pp 13-17

slide4

“In the 1960s I saw graphic design as a noble endeavor, integral to larger planning, architectural and social issues.

Aspen Design Conference

1966, Paul Rand

slide5

What I realized in the 1970s, when I was doing major corporate identity projects, is that design had become a preoccupation with what things look like rather than with what they mean.

  • Citicorp, Citibank Identification Program,
  • AnspachGrossman Portugal
  • 1975
slide6

What designers were doing was creating visual identities for other people - not unlike the work of fashion stylists, political image consultants or plastic surgeons.

  • Eye Bee M poster
  • Paul Rand
  • 1981
slide7

We had become experts who suggest how other people can project a visual impression that reflects who they think they are.

P Rand 1956-1985

slide8

And we have deceived ourselves into thinking that the modernization service we supply has the same integrity as service to the public good. Modernism forfeited its claim to a moral authority when designers sold it away as corporate style.

http://www.designhistory.org/Post_mod.html

PRand, 1985

slide9

“He invented the term Radical Modernism to distance himself from both the formal constraints of Modernism and the post modern label.”

http://www.designhistory.org/Post_mod.html

TM Magazine Cover

DF, 1972

slide10

”a reaffirmation

of the idealistic roots

of our modernity,

adjusted to include

more of our diverse

culture, history, research,

and fantasy."

1994, D Friedman

House Interior, DF @ 1978

slide11

“His approach is eminently reasonable

and certainlyresponds

to the mix of tastes, styles,

and ethnicities,

that have asserted a

presence withinour

emerging vision

of global culture.”

V Margolin

House Interior, DF @ 1978

slide12

“…design was in crisis and urged designers to see their work in a larger cultural context…”

3 Mile Island, painted lamp w found objects,

DF @ 1985

projects of optimism dan friedman
PROJECTS OF OPTIMISMDan Friedman*
  • Live & work with passion & responsibility.
  • Try to express personal, spiritual, & domestic values even if our culture continues to be dominated by corporate, marketing, & institutional values.
  • Choose to remain progressive; don’t be regressive. Find comfort in the past only if it expands insight into the future, & not just for the sake of nostalgia.
  • Embrace the richness of all cultures; be inclusive instead of exclusive.
slide14

Think of your work as a significant element in the context of a more important, transcendental purpose.

  • Use your work to become advocates of projects for the public good.
  • Attempt to become a cultural provocateur; be a leader rather than a follower.
slide15

Engage in self-restraint; accept the challenge of working with reduced expectations & diminished resources.

  • Avoid getting stuck in corners, such as being a servant to increasing overhead, careerism, or narrow points of view.
  • Bridge the boundaries that separate us from other creative professions & unexpected possibilities.
slide16

Use the new technologies, but don’t be seduced into thinking that they provide answers to fundamental questions.

  • Be radical.

*p 209, Radical Modernism

Logo for exhibit: Radical Modernism, Moore College of Art &

Design, 1994, Philadelphia

slide17

“Premature specialization

in schools perpetuates

a similar isolation in practice and works against

the hybridization

that is increasingly desirable in real professions.”

  • Does it Make Sense, Design quarterly. April Greiman, 1986
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