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Calories In, Calories Out: Food and Exercise in Public Elementary Schools, 2005. Mark Schneider Commissioner National Center for Education Statistics May 16, 2006. Introduction.

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Calories In, Calories Out: Food and Exercise in Public Elementary Schools, 2005

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Calories in calories out food and exercise in public elementary schools 2005 l.jpg

Calories In, Calories Out:Food and Exercise inPublic Elementary Schools, 2005

Mark Schneider

Commissioner

National Center for Education Statistics

May 16, 2006


Introduction l.jpg

Introduction

  • NCES releasing Calories In, Calories Out: Food and Exercise in Public Elementary Schools, 2005 on its website this morning

  • First U.S. Department of Education study to focus on food and exercise in public elementary schools

  • Prompted by concern about obesity among school-age children


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Study obtained information on:

  • Calories in:

    • Availability of foods outside of full school meals

  • Calories out:

    • Opportunities for physical activity in school

  • Weighing students and notifying parents:

    • Extent to which schools weigh students, calculate body mass index, and report to parents


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Study

  • Nationally representative sample of 1,198 regular public elementary schools

  • Conducted in spring 2005 through NCES’s Fast Response Survey System (FRSS)

  • Response rate of 91 percent


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Calories In


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Figure 1a: Schools offering food for sale outside of full school meals

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics,

Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


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Figure 1b:Of schools that offered foods for sale outside of full school meals, percent that sold foods to generate funds for food service operations

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics,

Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


Figure 2 availability of vending machine foods and school store snack bar foods l.jpg

Figure 2:Availability of vending machine foods and school store/snack bar foods

NOTE: Vending machines and school stores/snack bars may or may not be located in the school cafeteria.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


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Figure 3:Contract with companies to sell drinks/snack foods, by school locale

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics,

Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


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Figure 4:Contract with companies to sell drinks/snack foods, by region

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics,

Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


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Figure 5:Contract with companies to sell drinks/snack foods, by percent minority enrollment

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics,

Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


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Calories Out


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Figure 6: Schools with no scheduled recess, by grade level

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics,

Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


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Figure 7: Distribution of schools’ days per week of scheduled physical education, by grade level

NOTE: One percent of the schools did not have any scheduled physical education for elementary grades (not shown in figure). Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


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Differences by poverty concentration

  • The percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch at the school was used as a proxy for poverty concentration.

  • High poverty schools (75-100% free or reduced-price lunch) were less likely to have any scheduled recess or daily recess, compared to schools with lower poverty concentrations.

  • When the times for physical education and recess were combined, high poverty schools had lower averages in minutes per week.


Figure 8 grade 1 time spent in recess and physical education by poverty concentration l.jpg

Figure 8: Grade 1—Time spent in recess and physical education, by poverty concentration

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics,

Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


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Figure 9: School programs to encourage physical activity

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics,

Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


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Weighing students and notifying parents


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Figure 10:Extent schools calculated students’ BMI and measured height and weight

NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics,

Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


Figure 11 sent information on students bmi height and weight to parents l.jpg

Figure 11:Sent information on students’ BMI, height, and weight to parents

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics,

Fast Response Survey System (FRSS), “Foods and Physical Activity in Public Elementary Schools: 2005,” FRSS 87, 2005.


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Availability of Report

  • http://nces.ed.gov

  • Print copies available from ED Pubs in June 2006

  • Contacts for more information:

    Mike Bowler, IES Communications Director(202) 219 1662 mike.bowler@ed.gov

    Bernie Greene, FRSS Project Director(202) 502 7348 bernard.greene@ed.gov


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