Literary terms project
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 14

Literary Terms Project PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 87 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Literary Terms Project. Clause Colloquial/Colloquialism Conceit Connotation Denotation By: Alex Lee. 1. Clause. Contains a subject and a predicate Not necessarily a whole sentence unless simple sentence (ind clause) Independent Clause- a complete idea. Able to stand alone as a sentence

Download Presentation

Literary Terms Project

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Literary terms project

Literary Terms Project

Clause

Colloquial/Colloquialism

Conceit

Connotation

Denotation

By: Alex Lee


1 clause

1. Clause

  • Contains a subject and a predicate

    • Not necessarily a whole sentence unless simple sentence (ind clause)

  • Independent Clause- a complete idea. Able to stand alone as a sentence

  • Dependant Clause- Needs to be with an independent clause.


Clause continued

Clause Continued

  • ex. The dog ran. (Independent).

  • ex. Life moves pretty fast (Independent)if you don’t stop and look around once in a while (Dependent).

  • ex. When I was younger (Dependent)


2 colloquial colloquialism

2. Colloquial/Colloquialism

  • Basic everyday slang

    • Could be specific to a region or idea

  • Usually too informal for essay writing

  • Familiar conversation

  • Often coincides with diction or dialect


Colloquial colloquialism continued

Colloquial/Colloquialism Continued

  • ex. “Y’all best be gitt’n back”

  • ex. Whatever floats your boat.

  • ex. They were going to war, what a pickle!

  • Could very formal language be colloquial if you use it all the time?


3 conceit

3. Conceit

  • A clever or unusual way of expressing an idea or comparing/contrasting very different things

  • A complicated/extended metaphor

  • Often found in poetry/lyrics

  • Purposely meant to entertain reader with thought


Conceit continued

Conceit Continued

  • ex. The war veteran’s smile was a rainbow in the desert.

  • ex. Shakespeare’s “Thou art more lovely and more temperate [than a summers day]”

  • ex. The world is your oyster.


4 connotation

4. Connotation

  • A word’s implied meaning

  • Something you can interpret without literally defining the word

  • Can have effect on reader – positive, negative

  • Connotations can be of ideas, emotions, or attitudes

  • Opposite of Denotation


Connotation continued

Connotation Continued

  • ex. The word “fat” often has a negative connotation.

  • ex. Picture of Child = innocence

  • ex. A person’s choice of clothing may convey a connotation.


5 denotation

5. Denotation

  • The exact literal definition of a word

  • The opposite of Connotation

  • No further thought necessary

    • The Textbook definition

  • No metaphor


Denotation continued

Denotation Continued

  • ex. A gun: Something that fires a bullet/ something associated with fear, war, violence

  • ex. It was hot outside.

  • ex. The world spins round and round.


Works cited

Works Cited

  • Clause-

    • Dictionary.com

      • http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/clause

    • About.com

      • http://grammar.about.com/od/c/g/clauseterm.htm

  • Colloquial/Colloquialism

    • Merrium-Webster.com

      • http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/colloquial


Works cited1

Works Cited

  • Conceit

    • Merrium-Webster.com

      • http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conceit

    • Answers.yahoo.com

      • http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090330122227AAq3krc

    • Typesofpoetry.org

      • http://www.types-of-poetry.org.uk/14-conceit-poetry-type.htm

  • Connotation

    • Merrium-Webster.com

      • http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/connotation


Works cited2

Works Cited

  • All other information from AP Lit Terms Document provided by Curtis


  • Login