Finding a home at the nsf for your chemical biology proposal
Download
1 / 14

Finding a Home at the NSF for Your Chemical Biology Proposal - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 122 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Finding a Home at the NSF for Your Chemical Biology Proposal. George L. Kenyon April 30, 2009 Scripps Research Institute. A NSF “Experiment” at the Chemistry-Biology Interface.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha

Download Presentation

Finding a Home at the NSF for Your Chemical Biology Proposal

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Finding a home at the nsf for your chemical biology proposal
Finding a Home at the NSF for Your Chemical Biology Proposal

George L. Kenyon

April 30, 2009

Scripps Research Institute


Finding a home at the nsf for your chemical biology proposal

A NSF “Experiment” at the Chemistry-Biology Interface

“Experiment” - January 2008: Professor Wilfredo (Freddy) Colon joined the NSF as a rotator program director with a 50:50 appointment between the Division of Chemistry (CHE) and the Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences (MCB).

  • Main responsibilities of this position are to:

  • Facilitate and develop best practices for the review of proposals at the chemistry-biology interface, and keep proposals from “falling through the cracks”.

  • Facilitate the interactions between the MCB and CHE divisions

  • Interact with the community to help identify the best program for their proposals.


Finding a home at the nsf for your chemical biology proposal

Division of

Chemistry

Division of

Materials

Research

Division of

Physics

Division of

Astronomical

Sciences

Directorate forMathematical and Physical Sciences

Division of

Mathematical

Sciences

AST

CHE

DMR

DMS

PHY

Office of Multidisciplinary Activities (OMA)


Finding a home at the nsf for your chemical biology proposal

Division of

Environmental

Biology

Emerging

Frontiers

Division of

Molecular

and Cellular

Biosciences

Division of

Biological

Infrastructure

Directorate forBiological Sciences (BIO)

Division of

Integrative

Organismal

Systems

DBI

DEB

EF

IOS

MCB


Finding a home at the nsf for your chemical biology proposal

Structure of CHE and MCB

CHE

Organic and

Macromolecular

Chemistry

Physical

Chemistry

Integrated

Chemistry

Activities

Analytical

and Surface

Chemistry

Inorganic,

Bioinorganic,

and

Organometallic

Chemistry

MCB

Cellular

Systems

Cluster

Biomolecular

Systems

Cluster

Genes and

Genomes

Systems

Cluster

Most biochemistry proposals are submitted to the BMS in MCB cluster whereas most chemical biology proposals are submitted to CHE.


Finding a home at the nsf for your chemical biology proposal

Biochemistry and Chemical Biology at the NSF

  • Biochemistry - the study of the chemistry and chemical processes in living organisms.

    • Most biochemistry proposals are submitted to the Biomolecular Systems Cluster in MCB and are reviewed in the Molecular Biochemistry or Metabolic Biochemistry review panels supplemented with ad-hoc reviews.

    • Some biochemistry proposals that are more chemistry-oriented are submitted to CHE and are reviewed by different methods, depending on the Program.

  • Chemical Biology - involves the application of the tools and methods of chemistry to the study and manipulation of biological systems

    • Most chemical biology proposals are submitted to a CHE program.

    • Some chemical biology proposals are submitted to other divisions in the BIO Directorate, usually MCB.

  • Biochemistry and Chemical Biology proposals are sometimes co-reviewed and co-funded by CHE and MCB


Finding a home at the nsf for your chemical biology proposal

Structure of CHE and MCB

CHE

Organic and

Macromolecular

Chemistry

Physical

Chemistry

Integrated

Chemistry

Activities

Analytical

and Surface

Chemistry

Inorganic,

Bioinorganic,

and

Organometallic

Chemistry

MCB

Cellular

Systems

Cluster

Biomolecular

Systems

Cluster

Genes and

Genomes

Systems

Cluster

chemical biology?


Finding a home at the nsf for your chemical biology proposal

Recent Activities and Changes at the NSF to Address Proposals at the CHE-BIO Interface

  • Wrote a commentary to inform the community about the present and future of chemical biology at the NSF:

    • Chemical Biology at the US National Science Foundation, Nature Chemical Biology 4, 511-514

  • New CHE-MCB review panel was created to facilitate the review of proposals at the che-bio interface, including chemical biology.

  • Workshop on chemical biology is being planned for 2009 – to discuss leading edge, future trends, proposal review mechanism, funding opportunities, and education

  • CHE is proposing to create a new program, Chemistry of Life Processes, that will serve as a home to chemical biology proposals.


Che town hall meeting
CHE Town Hall Meeting Proposals at the CHE-BIO Interface

When: March 23, 2009

Where: Convention Center, Exhibit Hall 3

What Time: 4:30 - 6:30 PM

Main Agenda: Introduce Proposed New Programs of the Chemistry Division

  • Chemical Synthesis

  • Chemical Structure, Dynamics and Mechanisms

  • Chemical Measurement and Imaging

  • Theory, Models and Computational Methods

  • Environmental Chemical Sciences

  • Chemistry of Life Processes

  • Chemical Catalysis

  • Macromolecular / Supramolecular / Nanochemistry


Proposed program chemistry of life processes
Proposed Program: Proposals at the CHE-BIO InterfaceChemistry of Life Processes

Draft of Program Description:

  • The program supports research of novel chemistry in biological systems and the advancement of basic chemical research and transformative technologies through creative applications that address significant aspects of life processes.

  • The program also encourages research projects that exploit biological systems to advance fundamental and enabling aspects of chemistry.

  • Proposals that are compatible with the program are those that advance the knowledge and practice of chemistry.

  • Proposals that focus on addressing a biological question and that do not primarily use chemical approaches are more appropriate for the Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences (MCB).

  • Proposals that address biomedical problems are more appropriate for the NIH.

Program Contact: Wilfredo Colon, (703) 292-8171, wcolon@nsf.gov

E-mail questions, comments, or suggestions to chemplans@nsf.gov


Examples of research interest that would fit the chemistry of life processes program
Examples of Research Interest that would fit the Chemistry of Life Processes Program

Research of interest to the program includes fundamental chemistry

centered projects at the interface with biology. Some examples include,

but are not limited to:

  • synthetic methods for site-specific modifications of biomacromolecules;

  • the application of advanced spectroscopic techniques to study energy transformations in biological systems;

  • metal speciation, coordination and function;

  • chemical (bottom-up) synthetic biology;

  • chemical basis of ligand-biomacromolecule recognition;

  • studies of enzyme and ribozyme catalysis that focus on the chemistry;

  • the design and synthesis of riboswitches and small molecules that modulate biological systems.


Finding a home submit to che or mcb
Finding a Home: Submit to CHE or MCB? of Life Processes Program

Advise #1:Understand the key differences between CHE and MCB

  • MCB is mainly interested in the fundamental biological problem or question being addressed (i.e. the impact on Biology)

  • CHE is mainly interested in the novelty and significance of the chemical approach (i.e. the impact on Chemistry)

  • CHE and MCB do not support disease related proposals.

    Advice #2:Determine the focus and impact of your proposal

  • If the proposal is traditional biochemistry and the main focus is to understand the relationship between structure and function - submit to MCB

  • If the proposal focuses primarily on the chemical details or chemical approaches (e.g. synthesis, imaging/sensor, metal coordination, spectroscopy) - submit to CHE

  • Submit the proposal to the program that would be impacted the most by the research. Where is the greatest impact: the chemistry or the biology?

    Advice #3:If in doubt about the best program for your proposal, consult with program director

    Advice #4: Address both review criteria: the intellectual merit and broader impact

  • Understand the meaning of “broader impact” and take it seriously.


Review criteria
Review Criteria of Life Processes Program

Criterion 1:intellectual merit? (The focus is one the science)

  • Advancement of knowledge and understanding?

  • How qualified is the investigator(s)?

  • Impact of prior work?

  • Exploration of creative, original or potentially transformativeconcepts? (since Jan. 2008; revolutionizing entire disciplines; creating entirely new fields; or disrupting accepted theories and perspectives)

  • How well conceived and organized?

  • Resources?

    Criterion 2:broader impacts? (The focus is on the people)

  • Promotion of teaching, training, and learning?

  • Broadening participation?

  • Enhancement of infrastructure?

  • Dissemination?

  • Benefits to society?

    The Project Description must describe, as an integral part of the

    narrative, the broader impacts resulting from the proposed activities.


Summary
Summary of Life Processes Program

  • Most proposals at the chemistry-biology interface may be submitted to CHE or MCB, depending on the focus of the proposal and the impact of the research.

  • The proposed Chemistry of Life Processes program will provide a common and clear home for chemical biology proposals.

  • Communicate with Program Directors if there is any doubt about the most appropriate program for your proposal.

  • If you want your proposal to be co-reviewed by another division/program, you may identify a second program in Fastlane at the time of submission.

  • Take the broader impact criteria seriously.

  • If your proposal does not fit the program, the PDs will try to transfer it to the appropriate program, and will do their best to obtain a competent and fair review.


ad
  • Login