Cpts 401 adam carter
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CptS 401 Adam Carter. Privacy Section 2.1. For Tomorrow's In-Class Activity. Form into groups of 4 Make sure someone in your group brings a digital camera to class! Your group can’t get credit for the activity without one. Quiz Question 1.

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Privacy Section 2.1

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Cpts 401 adam carter

CptS 401

Adam Carter

PrivacySection 2.1


For tomorrow s in class activity

For Tomorrow's In-Class Activity...

  • Form into groups of 4

  • Make sure someone in your group brings a digital camera to class! Your group can’t get credit for the activity without one.


Quiz question 1

Quiz Question 1

Which of the following is a key aspect of privacy, according to the book:

  • Freedom from surveillance

  • Control of information about oneself

  • Freedom from intrusion

  • All of the above


Quiz question 1 answer

Quiz Question 1 Answer

D: All of the above (p. 45, 3 bullet points)


Quiz question 2

Quiz Question 2

In a court case discussed in the book, the government asked Google to release people’s search queries in order to crack down on material deemed harmful to minors. Was this be a violation of privacy?

  • No, because the search queries can be released without identifying information (“anonymized”)

  • No, because it is impossible to link a search query to the person who made the search.

  • Yes, because even if the search queries are stripped of identifying information, it is still possible to link some of the queries to the people who made them.

  • None of the above.


Quiz question 2 answer quiz question 3

Quiz Question 2 Answer/Quiz Question 3

(C): “It was not difficult to deduce the identity of some people, especially those who searched on their own name or address. A process called identified others” (p. 49). In this process, one identifies the individual from a set of anonymous data.

A. Identity trackingB. Re-identification

C. Identity deductionD. Unanonymizing


Quiz question 3 answer

Quiz Question 3 Answer

(B) “Re-identification means identifying the individual from a set of anonymous data” (p. 49).


Quiz question 4

Quiz Question 4

According to the book, the collection of personal information about a person without the person’s knowledge is known as

  • Invisible information gathering

  • Personal data scraping

  • Private data surveillance

  • Data Mining

  • None of the above


Quiz question 4 answer quiz question 5

Quiz Question 4 Answer/Quiz Question 5

(A): Invisible information gathering (p. 50)

Which of the following is a technique used for invisible information gathering?

  • Internet Service Provider data logs

  • Cookies

  • Supermarket club cards

  • Event data recorders in cars

  • All of the above


Quiz question 5 answer

Quiz Question 5 Answer

E: All of the above (see p. 51).

Now let’s focus on online behavior…


Is our online behavior private small group exercise

Is Our Online Behavior Private? (Small Group Exercise)

  • Anything we do online is recorded, at least briefly, and linked to our computer, if not our name.

  • With your group, identify the benefits and drawbacks of this.

  • Do you want your online data to be tracked? Is there a way you can prevent your online behavior from being tracked?

  • Be prepared to discuss your conclusions


Online invisible information gathering in the news

Online Invisible Information Gathering In the News!

Many phone manufacturers (Apple, Google, Microsoft) track and store your location.

Is this an invasion of privacy?


Quiz question 6

Quiz Question 6

The following privacy policy requires businesses to obtain explicit consent from a person for each use of the person’s personal information (by, e.g., checking a box):

  • Informed consent

  • Implied consent

  • Opt in

  • Opt out

  • None of the above


Quiz question 6 answer

Quiz Question 6 Answer

C: Opt-in (p. 53).

What about when people use an internet site that provides a free service with no explicit end-user agreement? What would be a reasonable business policy in this case?


Privacy case study 1 clicker

Privacy Case Study 1 (Clicker)

Ex. 2.9, p. 130: A company that supplies filtering software to schools to block access to objectionable websites sold statistical data about the websites visited by school children. The data did not identify the children or individual schools. Was this a privacy violation?

  • Yes

  • No

  • Unsure

    Why or why not? Discuss with group for 5 min.; apply ethical frameworks and privacy principles on p. 54


Privacy case study 2 clicker

Privacy Case Study 2 (Clicker)

Ex. 2.14, p. 130: People who fled hurricane Katrina left behind and lost important documents and records such as birth certificates, credit cars, property records, and employment records. A U.S agency proposed a new database where people could voluntarily store essential personal records in case of natural disasters. Is this a good idea?

  • Yes

  • No

  • Unsure

    Discuss pros and cons with group for 5 min.; apply ethical frameworks and privacy principles on p. 54


Privacy case study 3 clicker

Privacy Case Study 3 (Clicker)

Ex. 2.16, p. 131: A city government wants to track down people who run small businesses and do not pay the city’s $125 business license fee. The city hired a private detective to obtain IRS tax records of city residents and determine who has reported small-business income to the IRS but paid the license. Should this action by the city be permitted?

  • Yes

  • No

  • Unsure

    Discuss arguments for and against with group for 5 min.; apply ethical frameworks and privacy principles on p. 54


Case study warfare with unmanned drones

Case Study:Warfare with Unmanned Drones

One of the segments in Digital Nation explored the U.S. military’s use of unmanned drones to carry out military operations overseas. From the comfort of a sophisticated control room on a military base on U.S. soil, pilots carry out reconnaissance missions and bomb targets overseas. Drones have been known unintentionally to strike innocent people. Is it ethical for the military to operate unmanned drones?


Case study unmanned drones clicker poll

Case Study: Unmanned Drones (Clicker Poll)

Is it ethical for the military to operate unmanned drones?

  • Yes

  • No

  • Not sure


Case study computer game addiction

Case Study:Computer Game Addiction

As reported in Digital Nation, many youths in spend inordinate amounts of time playing video games. They play so much that their educations and social relationships suffer. Should the government establish restrictions on gaming for minors? If so, what kinds of restrictions? How would they be enforced?


Case study computer game addiction clicker poll

Case Study: Computer Game Addiction (Clicker Poll)

Should the government establish restrictions on gaming for minors?

  • Yes

  • No

  • Not sure


Case study iii discuss with group

Case Study III (Discuss with Group)

  • A man sued his health insurance company because it would not pay for Viagra, a drug for treating male impotence. He argued that the insurer’s refusal to pay denied his right to a happy sex life.

    • Negative (claim) right

    • Positive (liberty) right

    • A mix of the two


Case study iv discuss with group

Case Study IV (Discuss with Group)

  • Two legislators who ran for reelection lost. They sued an organization that sponsored ads criticizing their voting records. The former legislators argued that the organization interfered with their right to hold office.

    • Negative (claim) right

    • Positive (liberty) right

    • A mix of the two


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