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Understandings of place. KGA172 Space, Place and Nature Presented by Associate Professor Elaine Stratford Semester 2. Screen clipping taken: 14/08/2010, 1:50 PM. Part 1. Looking back, looking forward. Revising Lecture 2.11.

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Understandings of place

Understandings of place

KGA172 Space, Place and Nature

Presented by Associate Professor Elaine Stratford

Semester 2



Looking back looking forward

Part 1

Looking back, looking forward


Revising lecture 2 11
Revising Lecture 2.11

Draw a shoreline profile and label each component, explaining the processes in which it is implicated and the effects that it has on the coast. Refer back to Slide 8 of the lecture if you need to.

Now look back at Slide 9. Which parts of the image of St Helens correspond with which labels from the shoreline profile?

What human impacts can you discern from the image of the coast at St Helens? What implications might these impacts have?

Define and distinguish between spring and neap tides. How do tides affect coastal processes?

Next draw a wave profile, labelling its components and explaining how each operates. You may refer back to Slide 12 from the lecture.

Describe the difference between erosional and depositional coastal landform features, referring to as many different features and the processes which formed them as you can.

Remember to use words that were in italics in the presentation.

A Woman Thinking


Learning objectives
Learning Objectives

Module 3 Lecture 1

KGA172

Know and be able to (a) employ basic geographical terminology and concepts, (b) find, evaluate, analyse and reference appropriate literature, (c) contribute to debates about development and sustainability

Comprehend and be able to explain spatial patterns, generate basic maps, field sketches and graphs, and communicate in written and graphical forms

Apply key academic skills and (a) engage in critical thinking, discussion and listening, and in self-reflection and reflection upon the viewpoints of others and (b) research, plan and conduct fieldwork to collect data

Analyse and interpret basic spatial, numerical and qualitative information

Synthesize and integrate knowledge of social and Earth systems

  • be able to

    • distinguish between space and place, and describe variations on the ‘theme of place

    • understand and be able to explain the two approaches to the study of place

      • phenomenological

      • social constructionist

    • comprehend and be able to summarise content from a case study of place local to Tasmania


Textbook reading
Textbook Reading

Cresswell, T. (2004) Place: a short introduction, Blackwell, Oxford, Chapter 1 – Defining Place.

Jacobs, J. (1999) The labour of cultural geography, in E. Stratford (ed.) Australian Cultural Geographies, Oxford University Press,Melbourne, 11-24.

Plus

Winchester, H.P.M. (2005) Qualitative Research and its Place in Human Geography in Hay, I. (ed) Qualitative Research Methods in Human Geography, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, pp.3-17 (available in MyLO).

Critical reading

What is the author’s purpose?

What key questions or problems does the author raise?

What information, data and evidence does the author present?

What key concepts does the author use to organize this information, this evidence?

What key conclusions is the author coming to? Are those conclusions justified?

What are the author’s primary assumptions?

What viewpoints is the author writing from?

What are the implications of the author’s reasoning?

[from Foundation for Critical Thinking]

Old Woman Reading a Lectionary, Gerard Dou


Methods for understanding revisiting ideas about nature

Part 2

Methods for understanding: revisiting ideas about nature


Paradigm
Paradigm

  • A worldview shared by a knowledge producing community, such as the social sciences

  • A conceptual framework that sets the group’s boundaries, guides the questions to be asked and the methods that should be used to answer those questions

  • A never-innocent [value free] perspective




A mutually constitutive relationship
A mutually constitutive relationship

  • A two-way relationship

  • Cannot understand sense of place without understanding people and how the two interact

PlacePeople


Methods of approach to understanding place

Qualitative methods

Methods of approach to understanding place

Quantitative methods

Numeric and statistical

Controlled settings

Experimental settings

Scientific method

Deductive approaches

Nomothetic

Pursuit of laws, generalisation

Non-numerical

Natural settings

Interpretive method

Inductive approaches

Idiographic

Pursuit of patterns, particularities


Different approaches to knowledge

Nomothetic

Use of general laws to explain phenomena

Used most in natural sciences

Usually quantitative data and results

Focus on classes of things, categories

Numbers

Measurement

Presence/absence

Classification

Experiments

Statistics

Idiographic

A focus on particularity

Used often in the humanities and social sciences

Usually qualitative data and results

Focus on individual things, places, persons

Attitudes, perceptions, feelings

Interviews

Focus groups

Oral histories

[Auto]ethnography

Text, talk and practice

GENERAL PARTICULAR


On place

Part 3

On place


place is space given meaning … and it’s given meaning by us”

Liz Taylor (2005) Place: an exploration, Teaching Geography, Spring 2005, p.14.

Florence, Italy. E Stratford


The vocabulary of place
The vocabulary of place

genius loci

spirit of place

sense of place

placelessness

sense of displacement

Venice from San Giorgio Maggiore. E Stratford


The vocabulary of place1
The vocabulary of place

genius loci

spirit of place

sense of place

placelessness

sense of displacement

Isola de San Giorgio Maggiore. E Stratford


The vocabulary of place2
The vocabulary of place

genius loci

spirit of place

sense of place

placelessness

sense of displacement

Cini Foundation and Benedictine Cloister from Bell Tower,

Isola de San Giorgio Maggiore. E Stratford


The vocabulary of place3
The vocabulary of place

genius loci

spirit of place

sense of place

placelessness

sense of displacement

Colosseum trickster, Rome

E Stratford


The vocabulary of place4
The vocabulary of place

genius loci

spirit of place

sense of place

placelessness

sense of displacement

I was ‘here’




A case of space and place bangor tasman peninsula

Part 4

A case of Space and place: bangor, tasman peninsula


How is space related to place
How is space related to place?

“space is the physical dimension in which things exist, while place is space given meaning … So place can be defined as a portion of space, with its unique mix of the built and [or] the natural, recognised by one person, or a huge group of people, as personal to them in some way” Liz Taylor (2005) Place: an exploration, Teaching Geography Spring p.14.



Liz Taylor (2005, p. 15). Place: an exploration. Teaching Geography, Spring 2005.


For me, my existence is entwined with the land, and I cannot help but be powerfully affected by its spirit. It defines my sense of place, my belongings in life. I am a steward of this land and I have a fierce passion for it, and a sense of responsibility towards it” Cynthia Dunbabin.


“Bangor is the place where I belong. It has been my home for 35 years; it’s where I live, work, learn, form relationships and relax; where I am a part of a family stretching both to the past and into the future; and where I am grounded in the natural world. Situated on the northern end of Tasman peninsula, Bangor is a forested grazinglandscape. Of its 6,200 ha, 5,000 ha remain in a natural condition. The spirit of this place – its land and sea – is strong”.


Nature into numbers
Nature into Numbers

Slide by Cynthia Dunbabin


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