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Adverb Clauses. Basic Sentence Parts. Standard. ELA8C1 The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats. The student:

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Adverb Clauses

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Adverb Clauses

Basic Sentence Parts


Standard

ELA8C1 The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats. The student:

f. Analyzes the structure of a sentence (basic sentence parts, noun-adjective-adverb clauses and phrases).

g. Produces final drafts/presentations that demonstrate accurate spelling and the correct use of punctuation and capitalization.


Adverb Clause

  • Adverb Clauses are dependent clauses that act like adverbs. They modify verb, adjective, or adverb and tell when, where, how, why, to what extent.

    Ex. I will finish all of my homework early because I want to watch the game tonight.


Adverb Clauses do the same thing Adverbs do!

Remember: Adverbs are words that modify verbs, adverbs, and adjectives. They tell when, where, how, why, to what extent.

Ex. The extremely loud thunder made the windows rattle violently.

Ex. The windows rattled violently when the loud thunder roared.


What are they made of?

  • Adverb clauses consist of: A subordinating conjunction, a subject, and a predicate.

  • Subordinating Conjunction + Verb= Adverb Clause (after, although, as, as if, as long as, as soon as, as though, because, before, even though, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, whenever, where, wherever, while, etc.)

  • Be careful, sometimes these words aren’t conjunctions!


Adv. Clause Step One

Find a dependent clause that starts with a subordinating conjunction.

Ex. Since it is raining, the water level in the lake will rise.


Adv. Clause Step 2

  • Find the word in the sentence that the clause is modifying and see whether that word is a verb, adjective, or adverb. If it is, you probably have an adverb clause.

  •  Since it is raining, the water level in the lake will rise.


Adv. Clause Step 3

See whether the clause answers one of the questions: when, where, how, why, to what extent. If it does, then you definitely have an adverb clause.

Since it is raining, the water level in the lake will rise.


Find the Adverb Clauses

Ex. Alice went inside as soon as the rain started falling.

Ex. Jill worries more about thunder storms than James does.

Ex. The kids were scared because there was a tornado warning.


Adv. Clause vs. Adv. Phrase

An adverb clause will have a subordinating conjunction and a verb.

(It may have other parts too)

An adverb phrase WILL NEVER HAVE A VERB

Clause: I checked both ways before I crossed the street.

Phrase: I got up before sunrise.


Adv. phrase vs. Adv. clause

  • I stayed inside because it was too rainy.

  • I like to play baseball after school.

  • After you finish cooking dinner, wash the dirty dishes.


Placement

  • Adverb Clauses can be at the beginning or end of a sentence.

    Beginning: When I was little, I had a tricycle.

    End: I had a tricycle when I was little.

    Middle: I had a tricycle when I was little, and I took it down steep hills.


Adv. Clause vs. Adj. Clause


Adj. Clause vs. Adv. Clause

  • Since you are already standing up, will you take my plate to the kitchen for me?

  • The dog that is in the fence keeps barking.

    3. People who are afraid of heights do not enjoy airplane rides.

    4. I cannot legally drive until I turn 16.

    5. Andrew made an A on a test which was very difficult.


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