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Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns. Lesson 5 Joseph C. Blumenthal. Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns . Some action verbs can make complete statements about their subjects. Other action verbs require another word to complete the meaning of the sentence.

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Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

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Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Lesson 5

Joseph C. Blumenthal


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Some action verbs can make complete statements about their subjects. Other action verbs require another word to complete the meaning of the sentence.

An action verb is (always, sometimes) followed by a direct object.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Some action verbs can make complete statements about their subjects. Other action verbs require another word to complete the meaning of the sentence.

An action verb is (always, sometimes) followed by a direct object.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • The price of steel rose as a result of the strike.

  • The pricerose.

Although sentence a provides more detail than sentence b, the verb rose makes a (complete, incomplete) statement about the subject in both sentences.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • The price of steel rose as a result of the strike.

  • The pricerose.

Although sentence a provides more detail than sentence b, the verb rose makes a (complete, incomplete) statement about the subject in both sentences.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

The price of steel rose as a result of the strike.

Does the verb rose require a complement to complete the meaning of this sentence?

(Yes, No)


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

The price of steel rose as a result of the strike.

Does the verb rose require a complement to complete the meaning of this sentence?

(Yes, No)


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Here are two different action verb patterns:

Subject—Action Verb (S—V)

Subject—Action Verb Direct Object (S—V—DO)

Several athletes from our school completed.

  • The pattern of this sentence is

  • (S—V, S—V—DO).


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Here are two different action verb patterns:

Subject—Action Verb (S—V)

Subject—Action Verb Direct Object (S—V—DO)

Several athletes from our school completed.

  • The pattern of this sentence is

  • (S—V, S—V—DO).


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Subject—Action Verb (S—V)

Subject—Action Verb Direct Object (S—V—DO)

Anias Nin filled many diaries with her careful observations of people.

  • The pattern of this sentence is

  • (S—V, S—V—DO).


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Subject—Action Verb (S—V)

Subject—Action Verb Direct Object (S—V—DO)

Anias Nin filled many diaries with her careful observations of people.

  • The pattern of this sentence is

  • (S—V, S—V—DO).


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Which sentence is in the S-V-DO pattern?

  • The principalspoke a few words.

  • The principalspoke briefly.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Which sentence is in the S-V-DO pattern?

  • The principalspoke a few words.

  • The principalspoke briefly.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

In addition to a direct object, the S-V-DO sentence contains an indirect object, which explains to whom (or to what) or for whom (or for what) something is done.

  • Mr. Harvey sold his stamp collection recently.

  • Mr. Harvey sold my sister his stamp collection.

Which sentence contains an indirect object?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

In addition to a direct object, the S-V-DO sentence contains an indirect object, which explains to whom (or to what) or for whom (or for what) something is done.

  • Mr. Harvey sold his stamp collection recently.

  • Mr. Harvey sold my sister his stamp collection.

Which sentence contains an indirect object?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Mr. Harvey sold my sister his stamp collection.

The indirect object in this sentence is __________.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Mr. Harvey sold my sister his stamp collection.

The indirect object in this sentence is _ sister ___.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Mr. Harvey sold my sister his stamp collection.

When an indirect object is present, it always comes (before, after) the direct object.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Mr. Harvey sold my sister his stamp collection.

When an indirect object is present, it always comes (before, after) the direct object.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

The charcoalgives the meat a tangy flavor.

The indirect object in this sentence is _________.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

The charcoalgives the meat a tangy flavor.

The indirect object in this sentence is __ meat__.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

a. Shirley read Cynthia her letter.

b. Shirley read her letter to Cynthia.

In which sentence is Cynthia an indirect object?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

a. Shirley read Cynthia her letter.

b. Shirley read her letter to Cynthia.

In which sentence is Cynthia an indirect object?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

A linking verb can never by itself make a complete statement about its subject.

  • A linking verb must (always, sometimes) be completed by a subject complement that describes or identifies the subject of the sentence.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

A linking verb can never by itself make a complete statement about its subject.

  • A linking verb must (always, sometimes) be completed by a subject complement that describes or identifies the subject of the sentence.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

a. are, were, seemed, became

b. ate, took, studied, listened

  • Would you expect to find a subject complement after the words in group a or group b?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

a. are, were, seemed, became

b. ate, took, studied, listened

  • Would you expect to find a subject complement after the words in group a or group b?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Subject-Linking Verb  Subject Compliment

(S-LV-SC)

  • Larry lost his voice

  • Larry became hoarse.

  • Which sentence is in the S-LV-SC pattern?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

Subject-Linking Verb  Subject Compliment

(S-LV-SC)

  • Larry lost his voice

  • Larry became hoarse.

  • Which sentence is in the S-LV-SC pattern?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • Larry became a…

  • Larry found a…

  • Which sentence would be completed by a subject compliment?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • Larry became a …

  • Larry found a …

  • Which sentence would be completed by a subject compliment?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • In one sentence, are gettingis an action verb followed by a direct object; in the other, it is a linking verb followed by a subject compliment.

  • The boys are getting their own lunch.

  • The boys are getting hungry.

  • The verb are getting is a linking verb in which sentence?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • In one sentence, are gettingis an action verb followed by a direct object; in the other, it is a linking verb followed by a subject compliment.

  • The boys are getting their own lunch.

  • The boys are getting hungry.

  • The verb are getting is a linking verb in which sentence?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • The boys are getting hungry.

  • The word hungry is a (direct object, subject compliment).


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • The boys are getting hungry.

  • The word hungry is a (direct object, subject compliment).


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • The quality of the programs is excellent.

  • The quality of the program is improving.

  • In one of the sentences is serves as a helper to the main verb. In the other, it is a linking verb followed by a subject complement.

  • Which sentence contains a subject complement?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • The quality of the programs is excellent.

  • The quality of the program is improving.

  • In one of the sentences is serves as a helper to the main verb. In the other, it is a linking verb followed by a subject complement.

  • Which sentence contains a subject complement?


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • Gwen felt…about the tear in her jeans.

  • The missing word in this sentence would be a (subject complement, direct object).


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • Gwen felt…about the tear in her jeans.

  • The missing word in this sentence would be a (subject complement, direct object).


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • We moved the…to the kitchen.

  • The missing word in this sentence would be a (subject complement, direct object).


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • We moved the…to the kitchen.

  • The missing word in this sentence would be a (subject complement, direct object).


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • The house seemed strangely empty without the children

  • The word empty is a _______ _______.


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

  • The house seemed strangely empty without the children

  • The word empty is a subject complement.


In the following frames write the answers on your own sheet of paper.


Remember: V - a verb includes its helpersDO – who or what receives the actionIO – identifies for whom or to whomSC – renames, so you can replace the LV with an = sign

The boys sing sweetly.

1. S-

2. V-


Remember: V - a verb includes its helpersDO – who or what receives the actionIO – identifies for whom or to whomSC – renames, so you can replace the LV with an = sign

One must have been hiding.

3. S-

4. V-


Remember: V - a verb includes its helpersDO – who or what receives the actionIO – identifies for whom or to whomSC – renames, so you can replace the LV with an = sign

Students write essays.

5. S-

6. V-

7. DO-


Remember: V - a verb includes its helpersDO – who or what receives the actionIO – identifies for whom or to whomSC – renames, so you can replace the LV with an = sign

Henry took off his raincoat.

8. S-

9. V-

10. DO-


Remember: V - a verb includes its helpersDO – who or what receives the actionIO – identifies for whom or to whomSC – renames, so you can replace the LV with an = sign

I gave the teacher my essay.

11. S-

12. V-

13. IO–

14. DO-


Remember: V - a verb includes its helpersDO – who or what receives the actionIO – identifies for whom or to whomSC – renames, so you can replace the LV with an = sign

He taught others the game.

15. S-

16. V-

17. IO-

18. DO-


Remember: V - a verb includes its helpersDO – who or what receives the actionIO – identifies for whom or to whomSC – renames, so you can replace the LV with an = sign

Michael Jackson was the “King of Pop”.

19. S-

20. V-

21. SC-


Remember: V - a verb includes its helpersDO – who or what receives the actionIO – identifies for whom or to whomSC – renames, so you can replace the LV with an = sign

He is an icon in our culture.

22. S-

23. V-

24. SC-


Reviewing Basic Sentence Patterns

You are done!!!


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