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Map Reading. X marks the spot…. By Sergeant Greensill. Why do I need to know how to map read?. Within Cadets -Duke of Edinburgh Award -Field Craft Training -Classifications within cadets Out Of Cadets -Geography (and basic Maths) In School -Driving

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Map reading

Map Reading

X marks the spot…

By Sergeant Greensill


Why do i need to know how to map read
Why do I need to know how to map read?

Within Cadets

-Duke of Edinburgh Award

-Field Craft Training

-Classifications within cadets

Out Of Cadets

-Geography (and basic Maths) In School

-Driving

-Finding your way around in general (so you don’t get lost.)


What is a map
What is a map?

-A Map is a birds eye view of the surrounding area to help guide us from one place to another.

-It includes lines of Longitude

-And Line of latitude


Lines of longitude
Lines of Longitude

The prime Meridian runs NORTH TO SOUTH THROUGH GREENWICH

  • Lines ofLongituderun parallel to the Prime Meridian at Greenwich

The POLES DO NOT ROTATE

A line of Longitude is also referred to as a Meridian


Lines of latitude
Lines of Latitude

  • Lines of Latitude run parallel to the Equator


Co ordinates across the hall and up the stairs
Co-OrdinatesAcross the hall and up the stairs

1:50000

4 figure grid reference of A

=(13,34)

To find a four figure grid

Reference, you need to

Locate the bottom

left corner (the SW corner of the square)

that A is in.

A is 13 across, and 34 up.

1km


Co ordinates across the hall and up the stairs1
Co-OrdinatesAcross the hall and up the stairs

1:50000

6 figure grid reference of

A=(13?34?)

To be more precise in

mad reading, we need to

be able to use 6 figure

grid references, so we

break the box into

100 squares.

1km


Co ordinates across the hall and up the stairs2
Co-OrdinatesAcross the hall and up the stairs

(on a real map, symbols are smaller, so they are more accurate then our map, hence the remarked A)

To work out your 6 figure grid reference work from the bottom left hand corner of the large square.

For your first 3 digits take the start number going across (13) and place a number from 0-9 (depending on the positioning of the feature) to the end of our first 2 digits. E.g. 135 34?

For the second 3 digits take the first 3 digits, then the start number going up (34) and place a number from 0-9 (depending on positioning) to the end of the end of our second 2 digits. E.g. 135 345

35

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

34

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

13

14


Co ordinates across the hall and up the stairs3
Co-OrdinatesAcross the hall and up the stairs

So to find A, we went 13 and 5 mini- squares across (135), and then 34 and 5 mini squares up (345).

So the 6 figure grid reference of A would be

0.1km

35

9

8

7

6

135345

5

4

3

2

1

34

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

13

14


The key
The key

Just like a key to a door, the key on a map helps you to unlock the information stored in the colours and symbols on a map.

The key will help you to identify types of boundaries, roads, buildings, agriculture, industry, places of interest and geographical features.


Scale
Scale

The scale is very important. It helps you find the size, height and dimensions of the features shown on a map.

Explorer maps are 1:25,000 (1 cm = 250 m). These are useful for walking and other outdoor pursuits. This is the type we use for D of E.

So for every 1cm on a map, its 250m. So 4 cm is 1km.


M726 map
M726 Map

-It is a 1:50,000 map

So for every 1cm on the map, you are looking at 500m.

Every grid square on an M726 map is 2cm by 2cm, So how big is one square?

Each Square is 1km.

- This map is TEPOGRAPHIC meaning that the map shows the shape and surface detail of the land. This includes natural and man-made features.


Using a compass
Using a Compass

This is why we use degrees of travel (bearings).

When referring to a compass directions you will already know that the compass can be broken up into Directions..e.g North, South, East and West

360°

90°

270°

For this reason we break it down into 16 directions of travel, but still this isn’t very accurate when reading a map and you’re trying to get somewhere specific

This is only accurate to four directions of travel

180°


Using a compass1
Using a compass

What’s the point? It just points north…

A compass can help you find your way as it can be used to set BEARINGS.

You set a bearing so that you can travel from one place to another, and is useful to check you are travelling in the right direction.


Contour lines

50

Contour Lines

  • -A contour line is a reddish brown line drawn on the map joining all points of equal height above mean sea level (MSL)

  • -Each line is a 10 metre interval on the M726 series.

  • -The closer the lines are together, the steeper the gradient (either up or down)

  • 1:1 is a steep gradient

  • 1:20 is not so steep

  • If there are many line together at the base of a slope, we say the shape is convex


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