Preparing for tragedy in the workplace
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Preparing For Tragedy In The Workplace. Presented By: Sponsored By:. Welcome AGRIP. Agenda:. Introduction Critical incident response planning Understanding the impact on the organization Providing leadership Responding to the organization Moving forward Policy audit

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Preparing for tragedy in the workplace

Preparing For Tragedy In The Workplace

Presented By: Sponsored By:


Welcome agrip

Welcome AGRIP


Agenda

Agenda:

  • Introduction

  • Critical incident response planning

  • Understanding the impact on the organization

  • Providing leadership

  • Responding to the organization

  • Moving forward

  • Policy audit

  • Web resources


Shrm survey of human resource professionals

SHRM Survey of Human Resource Professionals

  • After September 11th:

    • 60% said their company had not done advance planning, and were not prepared.

    • 49% had an Employee Assistance Program in place prior to September 11.

    • 8% felt they were properly prepared.


Pricewaterhousecooper s post sept 11 survey results

PriceWaterhouseCooper’s Post Sept. 11, Survey Results

  • Did your employer’s response influence the way you feel about your organization?


Pricewaterhousecooper s post sept 11 survey results1

PriceWaterhouseCooper’s Post Sept. 11, Survey Results

  • As employees strove to return to normalcy, the top five things they were looking for to help them cope, refocus, and regain productivity were:

    • Continued communication on issues, priorities and accomplishments.

    • Flexibility with employees who were most traumatized.

    • Continued counseling.

    • Ensured safety of employees.

    • Educating managers on how to respond to employees’ concerns related to the aftermath of September 11th..


Pricewaterhousecooper s post sept 11 survey results2

PriceWaterhouseCooper’s Post Sept. 11, Survey Results

  • Slightly more than one-quarter of employees surveyed from organizations with a presence near Ground Zero are now more willing to stay with their organization as a result of the favorable way their employers handled the September 11th tragedy.


Pricewaterhousecooper s post sept 11 survey results3

PriceWaterhouseCooper’s Post Sept. 11, Survey Results

  • How soon after the attack did your organization initiate communication with employees and/or provide them with services?


Pricewaterhousecooper s post sept 11 survey results4

PriceWaterhouseCooper’s Post Sept. 11, Survey Results

  • Employees who evaluated their organizations’ response as fair or poor cited:

    • Too much focus on business as usual.

    • Not providing an outlet for emotions (e.g. counseling).

    • Insufficient communications.


Pricewaterhousecooper s post sept 11 survey results5

PriceWaterhouseCooper’sPost Sept. 11, Survey Results

  • Although there was overwhelming approval for how employers handled the tragedy, 50% of therespondents identified ways their organizations could have improved their response. Of these, respondents wanted:

    • Better disaster planning and quicker responses - 31%

    • Better communication - 19%


Critical incident response planning

Critical Incident Response Planning


Key components of the planning process

Key Components of the Planning Process

  • Develop the Plan

  • Identify providers of services

  • Create a manual

  • Conduct training

  • Test the Plan

  • Communicate

  • Evaluate readiness


Key components of the plan

Key Components Of The Plan

  • Develop a Critical Incident (C. I.) Response Planin advance:

    • Designate your crisis management team and decision-makers.

    • Ensure seamless interface with federal, state and local governmental agencies.

    • Protect company personnel, physical assets and business equities.


Key components of the plan1

Key Components Of The Plan

  • Identify a C. I. Response Provider.

    • Provider should:

      • Offer stress/trauma debriefing services.

      • Assist with development of C. I. Response Plan.

      • Have the capability of providing an immediate on-site

        C. I. Response Team.

      • Be capable of providing long-term counseling.

      • If provider is not the organization’s EAP, it must collaborate with EAP provider and internal responders.


Key components of the plan2

Key Components Of The Plan

  • Prepare a C. I. Response Manual.

    • Manual should:

      • Outline the Plan step-by-step

      • Detail roles of employees.

      • Detail accountabilities of internal and external responders including:

        • Time frames for action.

        • On-going follow-up.

        • Monitoring.


Key components of the plan3

Key Components Of The Plan

  • Conduct pre-incident training.

    • Training should:

      • Acquaint staff with the overall C. I. Response Plan.

      • Communicate specific roles of key individuals (internal responders/supporters) and external providers.

      • Familiarize staff with the types of potential emotional impact that may follow a C. I.

      • Provide specific training to key individuals.


Key components of the plan4

Key Components Of The Plan

  • Role play.

    • Conduct periodic “fire drills.”

    • Evaluate effectiveness of C. I. Response Plan.

    • Adjust accordingly.


Key components of the plan5

Key Components Of The Plan

  • Develop contingency communication plan.

    • Designate communications coordinator.

      • Steady communication reduces rumors.

    • Employees look to their immediate supervisor:

      • Ensure they understand the C.I. Response Plan.

      • Provide FAQs and answers for supervisors.

    • Ensure important contact numbers are accessible.


Validating the plan

Validating The Plan

  • Planning:

    • Do we have a written emergency plan?

    • Does it include detailed instructions of what is to occur in an emergency?

    • Are employees designated to act in the event of an emergency?


Validating the plan1

Validating The Plan

  • Planning (continued):

    • Have we sought advice from our insurance carrier, an industry organization, or a government emergency planning office concerning our emergency plans?

    • Have we posted the 911 emergency number?


Validating the plan2

Validating The Plan

  • Training :

    • Do we train supervisors in how to handle emergencies?

    • Do we have refresher courses on this training?

    • Do we review our training on an annual basis?

    • Do we train employees in how to handle emergencies?


Validating the plan3

Validating The Plan

  • Training (continued):

    • Do we conduct emergency drills?

    • Do we provide first-aid training for our employees?


Validating the plan4

Validating The Plan

  • Contact:

    • Have we identified a person who is able to communicate information to:

      • Other facilities that might face the same emergency?

      • Employees who may be arriving at work soon?

      • Others who may be in danger?

      • Our home office?

      • Relatives of employees?

      • Relatives of any customers involved?


Validating the plan5

Validating The Plan

  • Contact (continued):

    • Have we identified a person who is able to communicate information to:

      • The media?

      • Shareholders?


Validating the plan6

Validating The Plan

  • Emergency Preparedness:

    • Does the employee alarm system provide ample warning or reaction time?

    • Can the employee alarm be easily perceived above ambient noise or light levels?

    • Is the employee alarm distinctive and immediately recognizable?

    • Have employees been told how to report emergencies?


Validating the plan7

Validating The Plan

  • Emergency Preparedness (continued):

    • Are emergency telephone numbers posted near telephones, employee bulletin boards, and other conspicuous locations?

    • Are all employee alarm systems maintained in operating condition?

    • Do we have the appropriate fire extinguishers, and are the inspections current?


Validating the plan8

Validating The Plan

  • Emergency Preparedness (continued):

    • Have we made every legal effort to determine which employees have a disability?

    • Do we have an evacuation plan specific to the needs of employees with disabilities?


Validating the plan9

Validating The Plan

  • Communications:

    • Do we have an effective way of communicating during a critical incident?

    • Have we communicated the plan to all employees?

    • Have we assured employees in advance that we are prepared for a critical incident?


The plan

The Plan

  • A well understood and validated Critical Incident Response Plan underpins and incorporates the mental health response by:

    • Ensuring a robust, timely and effective response to a traumatic event through-

      • Timely identification of issues and needs which arise.


The plan1

The Plan

And by:

  • Providing a well coordinated and effective delivery of services ( medical, psychological) to employees-

    • EAP

    • Debriefing


Evaluation of readiness

How will you reach all of your employees?

How will you communicate to employees what they need to be doing to ensure their safety?

Who will be the primary communicator?

Who will continue to sustain frequent communications?

How will employees ascertain if the organization is open for business and where and when they should report to work?

Do you have counseling through EAP?

Will you be providing counseling on-site for employees?

Are your managers trained to deal with distraught employees?

What will you do for employees who can not travel home, either within the city or from other destinations?

Do you have a plan to deal with displaced employees?

Can your employees work remotely?

Does your infrastructure support a large number of employees working remotely?

Are you prepared to evacuate employees with disabilities?

Do all employees have life/accident insurance?

Do you provide employees guidance on essential/non-essential travel as well as alternatives to travel?

Evaluation of Readiness


Remember

REMEMBER:


Understanding the impact on the organization

Understanding the Impact on the Organization


Rating the impact

Rating The Impact

  • 1. How serious was the incident for your company?

    Minor Major

  • 0 ............... 2 ............... 4 ............... 6 ............... 8 ............... 10


Rating the impact1

Rating The Impact

  • 2. How extensive were fatalities, permanent injuries or other catastrophic losses to employees or their families?

    Minimal Extreme

  • 0 ............... 3 ............... 6 ............... 9 ............... 12 ............... 15


Rating the impact2

Rating The Impact

  • 3. How serious were the consequences of the incident to the company and people close to the company?

    Minor Major

  • 0 ............... 2 ............... 4 ............... 6 ............... 8 ............... 10


Rating the impact3

Rating The Impact

  • 4. How conscious and aware were employees of an immediate threat to themselves and each other from what was happening during the incident?

    Unaware Very Aware

  • 0 ............... 1 ............... 1 ............... 3 ............... 4 ............... 5


Rating the impact4

Rating The Impact

  • 5. How much fear, terror or horror did employees experience as a result of the incident?

    Least Most

  • 0 ............... 2 ............... 4 ............... 6 ............... 8 ............... 10


Rating the impact5

Rating The Impact

  • 6. What is the impact on the company of the challenges posed by the incident?

    Least Most

  • 0 ............... 2 ............... 4 ............... 6 ............... 8 ............... 10


Rating the impact6

Rating The Impact

  • 7. To what degree do you feel that actions, misjudgments, negligence, carelessness or even deliberate recklessness by someone outside the company caused or contributed to the incident?

    Least Most

  • 0 ............... 2 ............... 4 ............... 6 ............... 8 ............... 10


Rating the impact7

Rating The Impact

  • 8. To what degree do you feel that actions, misjudgments, negligence, carelessness or even deliberate recklessness by the company or someone in the company contributed to the effects of the incident?

    Least Most

  • 0 ............... 2 ............... 4 ............... 6 ............... 8 ............... 10


Rating the impact8

Rating The Impact

  • 9. How serious have any other previous incidents or other major losses in the company in recent years been?

    Least Most

  • 0 ............... 2 ............... 4 ............... 6 ............... 8 ............... 10


Rating the impact9

Rating The Impact

  • 10. Rate the other current stresses in the company.

    Least Most

  • 0 ............... 2 ............... 4 ............... 6 ............... 8 ............... 10


Rating the impact10

Rating The Impact

  • Your Score:

    • 80-100 Devastating

    • 60-79 Powerful

    • 40-59 Significant

    • 20-39 Moderate

    • 0-19 Minimal


Understanding the impact on the organization1

Understanding the Impact on the Organization

  • Three stages of reaction to catastrophic events:

    • Shock -- numbness.

    • Grasping reality -- gathering facts.

    • Coping -- moving ahead in changed circumstances.


Providing leadership

Providing Leadership


Providing leadership1

Providing Leadership

“Managers do things right; leaders do the right thing.”


Providing leadership2

Providing Leadership

  • Leadership is the team of the CEO and the senior executives as a united front.

  • “The higher the Incident Impact Score, the more important it is that “the CEO be highly visible as the point person.”

    Wall Street Journal


Providing leadership3

Providing Leadership

  • Leader’s role is radically expanded.

    "Nothing that I am doing is the same as before. There are no answers for this in the C.E.O. manual.”

    Kim S. Fennebresque CEO SG Cowen Securities


Providing leadership4

Providing Leadership

  • TAKE CHARGE:

    • T - Target fears and anxiety.

    • A - Accept the fact that performance will drop.

    • K - Keep communication open.

    • E - Educate managers.


Providing leadership5

Providing Leadership

  • TAKE CHARGE (continued):

    • C - Calm, confident, and reassuring leadership.

    • H - Help those in need.

    • A - Allow people to display their emotions.

    • R - Restrict negative behavior.

    • G - Get people to focus on a higher calling.

    • E - Expect and plan for recurrences.


Providing leadership6

Providing Leadership

  • Show courage and confidence.

    “If the head guy doesn’t think you’re gonna make it… you’re not gonna make it.”

    John Phelan

    President of NYSE

    During October 1987 market crash


Providing leadership7

Providing Leadership

  • Provide determination and direction.

    “ You need the twin executive virtues of strength and availability: Strong, because people want reassurance, and available, because they want to cry.”

    Kim K. Polese CEO of Marimba,


A leader

A Leader


Pricewaterhousecooper s post sept 11 survey results6

PriceWaterhouseCooper’sPost Sept. 11, Survey Results

  • Employees who received “high touch” personalized services had the following reactions:

    • “Managers did not act like managers that day…they were more like friends…everyone was treated equally regardless of position.”

    • “The way our company responded to the September 11 events has proven to me that we still honor our corporate values.”


Responding to the organization

Responding To The Organization


Aftereffects

Aftereffects

  • Distraction.

  • Difficulty Focusing.

  • Confusion over priorities.

  • Guilt and Personal Responsibility


Aftereffects1

Aftereffects

  • Helplessness and Loss of Control.

    • Typical initial feeling in the face of the catastrophe.

    • Calls for leadership and guidance on ways to act.

    • Solutions may arise from anywhere in the company.


Aftereffects2

Aftereffects

  • Anger & Blame

    • Typical initial reaction in the face of loss of control.

    • Company and its response under scrutiny and may become early target

    • Defend and deflect less effective than listen and act.


Aftereffects3

Aftereffects

  • Disruption

    • Disorder takes over.

    • Uncertain process of reactions and response.


How to respond

How To Respond

  • Follow your Critical Incident Plan.

  • Maintain on-going communication.

  • Work as a team.

  • Take care of the responders.

    • Make sure the counselors receive counseling.


How to respond1

How To Respond

  • Remember your organization’s core values.

  • Accept vulnerability and individual frailty.

  • Fatalities:

    • Take care of families.

  • Return to a “normal” life as soon as possible.

  • Reach out to others.

    • The families of Pan Am 103 found solace in reaching out to the surviving families of TWA 800.


How to respond2

How To Respond

  • Respect Faith and Beliefs.

    • Some may find belief shaken initially.

      • How Could a God allow this to happen?

  • Maintain racial and religious tolerance.

  • Do not tolerate discrimination or harassment.

  • Listen, Listen, Listen.

  • Communicate, communicate, communicate.


Pricewaterhousecooper s post sept 11 survey results7

PriceWaterhouseCooper’sPost Sept. 11, Survey Results

  • The clear message of the survey was that people first wanted their organizations to:

    • Inform them about what was happening.

    • Quickly give them direction on how to remain physically safe, and then take care of their emotional well-being.

    • Once those needs were met, employees wanted to feel pride that their organization contributed significantly to the efforts that addressed the tragedy.


Moving forward

Moving Forward


Moving forward1

Moving Forward

  • Healing from stress reactions involves two further steps:

    • Insight -

      • One’s perspective changes.

      • We can make lemonade out of lemons.

      • Look for a silver lining.


Moving forward2

Moving Forward

  • Healing from stress reactions involves two further steps (continued):

    • Acceptance -

      • Finding a way past blame, abandoning cynicism and going forward with peace in your heart.


Moving forward3

Moving Forward

  • It’s not how much you do, but that you mean it.

  • Foster a team spirit for your company.

  • Plan two first steps your company can take.

  • Examine your Critical Incident Plan:

    • Is it sufficient for the world as it is since Sept. 11?

    • Do we revisit the plan periodically and ensure its currency ?


Policies and procedures

Policies And Procedures


Policies and procedures1

Policies And Procedures

  • Confirm the following are up-to-date and conspicuously posted and/or distributed:

    • Americans with Disabilities Act:

      • Ask employees to self-identify.

      • Identify specific needs for assistance during evacuation.

    • Equal Employment Opportunity:

      • Maintain unbiased recruitment and employment standards.

      • Ensure management understands what constitutes

        discrimination.


Policies and procedures2

Policies And Procedures

  • Communications:

    • Align policy with Critical Incident Plan.

    • Communicate who has what responsibility.

  • Harassment:

    • Ensure management understands what constitutes harassment.

  • Leaves of Absence:

    • Ensure Military Leave rights and responsibilities are clearly defined and communicated.

    • Clearly communicate FMLA policy and procedures.


Policies and procedures3

Policies And Procedures

  • Payroll:

    • Ensure contingency procedures are in place for off-site processing if necessary.

  • Workers Compensation:

    • Ensure employees understand their rights and responsibilities.

    • Ensure Penalties for false claims are understood.


Web resources

Web Resources


Web resources1

Web Resources

September 11, 2001 Aftermath

http://www.eeoc.gov


Web resources2

Web Resources

ESGR

Committee of Employer Support for the Guard & Reservehttp://www.esgr.org


Web resources3

Web Resources

http://www.fema.gov


Web resources4

Web Resources

U.S. Department of Justice

Americans with Disabilities Act

ADA HOME PAGE

http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/adahom1.htm


Web resources5

Web Resources

http://www.osha.gov


Web resources6

Web Resources

http://www.dol.gov/dol/vets/


Web resources7

Web Resources

US Office of Personnel Management

Post-Disaster Guidance and Other Information

http://www.opm.gov/guidance/index.htm


Web resources8

Web Resources

Society for Human Resource Management

http://www.shrm.org/default.asp


Thank you

Thank You!


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