Enabling the smart grid with ami and sap at pse g
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 49

Enabling the Smart Grid with AMI and SAP at PSE&G PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 229 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Enabling the Smart Grid with AMI and SAP at PSE&G. Jerry Casarella Chief Architect PSEG. Contents. Smart Grid Scope and Definition Smart Grid Key Components Smart Grid Key Characteristics and Applications Smart Grid Architecture AMI Definition and Components AMI and Smart Grid.

Download Presentation

Enabling the Smart Grid with AMI and SAP at PSE&G

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Enabling the smart grid with ami and sap at pse g

Enabling the Smart Grid with AMI and SAP at PSE&G

Jerry Casarella

Chief Architect PSEG


Contents

Contents

  • Smart Grid Scope and Definition

  • Smart Grid Key Components

  • Smart Grid Key Characteristics and Applications

  • Smart Grid Architecture

  • AMI Definition and Components

  • AMI and Smart Grid


Smart grid scope and definition

Smart Grid Scope and Definition


Smart grid scope

Part of the overall energy ecosystem that included Generation, Transmission, Distribution and the Customer premise

Energy Markets

Energy Markets

Smart

Smart

Smart

Smart

Smart

Smart

Smart

Smart

Smart

Smart

Smart

Smart

Generation

Generation

Generation

Generation

Grid

Grid

End Use

End Use

Grid

Grid

End Use

End Use

Commercial/

Commercial/

Centralized

Centralized

Distributed

Distributed

Commercial/

Commercial/

Centralized

Centralized

Distributed

Distributed

Transmission

Transmission

Distribution

Distribution

Residential

Residential

Transmission

Transmission

Distribution

Distribution

Residential

Residential

Industrial

Industrial

Industrial

Industrial

Distribution

Distribution

Distribution

Distribution

Baseload

Baseload

Transmission

Transmission

Smart Motors

Smart Motors

Baseload

Baseload

Transmission

Transmission

Smart

Smart

Smart Motors

Smart Motors

Smart

Smart

Operations

Operations

Operations

Operations

Operations

Operations

& Devices

& Devices

Operations

Operations

Appliances

Appliances

& Devices

& Devices

Appliances

Appliances

Information

Information

Information

Information

Peaking

Peaking

Peaking

Peaking

Plug

Plug

-

-

in

in

Plug

Plug

-

-

in

in

Systems

Systems

Systems

Systems

Hybrids

Hybrids

Hybrids

Hybrids

Demand

Demand

Demand

Demand

Intermittent

Intermittent

Intermittent

Intermittent

Response

Response

Response

Response

Critical /

Critical /

Asset

Asset

Advanced

Advanced

Building

Building

Critical /

Critical /

Asset

Asset

Advanced

Advanced

Building

Building

Backup

Backup

Management

Management

Metering

Metering

Automation

Automation

Backup

Backup

Management

Management

Metering

Metering

Automation

Automation

Green

Green

Grid

Grid

Site Energy

Site Energy

Green

Green

Grid

Grid

Site Energy

Site Energy

Photovoltaic

Photovoltaic

Photovoltaic

Photovoltaic

Power

Power

Monitoring

Monitoring

Mgmt Systems

Mgmt Systems

Power

Power

Monitoring

Monitoring

Mgmt Systems

Mgmt Systems

Grid

Grid

Grid

Grid

Automation

Automation

Automation

Automation

Power

Power

Power

Power

Electronics

Electronics

Electronics

Electronics

Smart

Smart

Communication

Communication

Smart

Smart

Communication

Communication

Dist. Devices

Dist. Devices

& Control

& Control

Dist. Devices

Dist. Devices

& Control

& Control

Smart

Smart

Smart

Smart

Storage

Storage

Storage

Storage

Enterprise

Enterprise

Enterprise

Enterprise

Integration

Integration

Integration

Integration

Smart Grid Scope

Source: Global Environment Fund and The Center for Smart Energy

4


Smart grid scope smart grid encompasses the entire electric delivery system

Smart Grid ScopeSmart Grid encompasses the entire Electric Delivery System

  • Transmission Grid

    • Control/Indication (SCADA)

    • Advanced Sensors supporting overall grid reliability

      • Phasor Measurement Units

      • Temperature sensors to support dynamic line ratings

  • Substation

    • Control/Indication of major equipment (SCADA)

    • Time synchronized real-time data from major equipment and relays

      • Smart Sensors

    • Voltage/load control

  • Distribution Grid

    • Demand response

    • Outage Management

    • Grid Management

    • Asset Management


Smart grid definition key technology components source doe modern grid

Smart Grid Definition – Key Technology Components Source: DOEModernGrid

The Modern Grid Initiative has defined a Smart Grid as a modernized Electricity Network using the following digital and informational technologies to meet key characteristics:

Integrated Communications – High-speed, fully integrated, two-way communication technologies

Sensing and Measurement – Technologies to: enhance power system measurements, evaluate the health of equipment and the integrity of the grid, support advanced protective relaying. eliminate meter estimations. prevent energy theft, enable consumer choice and demand response

Advanced Components – Advanced components used to determine the grid’s behavior. These power system devices will apply the latest research in materials, superconductivity, energy storage, power electronics, and microelectronics.

Advanced Control Methods – New methods to monitor essential components and enable the rapid diagnosis and timely, appropriate response to any event.

Improved Interfaces and Decision Support – Seamless, real-time use of applications and tools that enable grid operators and managers to make decisions quickly.


Electric grid today

Substation

Generation

Metering

Distribution System

Transmission System

Electric Grid Today…

  • Communications technology has limited information available to grid operators

    • Some data from substations

    • Monthly meter readings

    • Customer calls for outages and other issues

  • Lack of information limits the grid operator’s ability to manage the grid efficiently

    • Limited customer motivation to manage usage


A smart grid would be much different

Substation

Analysis

Systems

Grid Operator

Generation

Metering

Distribution System

Transmission System

A “Smart Grid” Would be Much Different…

  • Information from across entire grid

    • Two-way communications reaching inside the home

    • Advanced sensors and metering

  • Customer motivated to manage load

  • Advanced applications to support decision making


Smart grid key components

Smart Grid Key Components


Key smart grid components smart meters and sensors

Smart relays

Substation

Smart meters

Generation

Smart sensors

Distribution System

Transmission System

Key Smart Grid ComponentsSmart Meters and Sensors

  • Smart meters at all customer locations

    • Automated Meter Infrastructure (AMI)

  • Smart relays at all substations

  • Advanced sensors on transmission and distribution lines


Key smart grid components communications across grid

High Speed Two-way Communications

Substation

Home Area Network

Generation

Distribution System

Transmission System

Key Smart Grid ComponentsCommunications Across Grid

  • High-speed communications to substation and distribution devices

  • Two-way communications to the customer (AMI)

    • Enable Home Area Networks (HAN)


Key smart grid components advanced components

Key Smart Grid ComponentsAdvanced Components

  • Distributed generation and energy storage

    • Solar and/or wind installations

  • Home Area Network (HAN) in customer homes

    • Smart thermostats/Energy Management and Demand Response

    • Smart appliances

    • Plug-in Electric Hybrid Vehicles

  • Equipment monitoring devices in stations

Energy

Management

Substation

Solar

Generation

Smart

Appliances

PHEV

Distributed

Generation

Distribution System

Transmission System


Key smart grid components decision support systems

Key Smart Grid ComponentsDecision Support Systems

  • Distribution Management System to support Grid Operator

    • 3 million+ devices on the system

    • Data from across system (voltage, power factor, outages, etc)

    • Automated control throughout grid

  • Enhancements to existing systems needed

    • Outage Management, Asset Management, etc

    • Must leverage available data

Advanced Applications

to support

Grid Operator

Substation

Generation

Distribution System

Transmission System


Smart grid key characteristics and applications

Smart Grid Key Characteristics and Applications


Smart grid definition key characteristics source doe modern grid

Smart Grid Definition – Key Characteristics Source: DOE Modern Grid

  • Seven principal characteristics comprise the systems view of the modern grid

  • Self-heals

  • Motivates and Includes the consumer

  • Resists attack

  • Provides power quality for 21st century needs

  • Accommodates all generation and storage options

  • Enables markets

  • Optimizes assets and operates efficiently


Key characteristics rationale benefits technologies

Rationale

Minimize interruptions

Restore service quickly

Real-time data supporting condition assessment and contingency analysis

Benefits

Lower SAIFI, MAIFI & CAIDI

Improved Customer Satisfaction

Reduce outage related cost for customers

Key Characteristics: Rationale, Benefits, Technologies

Self-heals

Supportingtechnologies

  • 13kV Loop-scheme

  • Class H transfer scheme

  • Energy Management System

    • Contingency Analysis

    • Synchrophasors

    • Dynamic transmission line ratings

  • Outage Management System

  • Advanced-loop scheme

  • Distribution/Substation automation

  • Distribution Management System

  • High speed two way communications (AMI)

    • Real-time customer outage information

    • Control/indication across system


A smart grid self heals

A Smart Grid “Self-heals”

A Smart Grid reports outages and automatically restores customers

Substation

CURRENT GRID

SMART GRID

Substation

Grid Operator

Outage

Reports

X

X

Plant damage can interrupt multiple customers

Automatic

Restoration


Key characteristics rationale benefits technologies1

Rationale

Real-time demand and price to the customer

Modified customer consumption

Benefits

Lower cost for customers

Reduce system peak

Lower capital expenditure & improve utilization

Environmental benefits

Key Characteristics: Rationale, Benefits, Technologies

Motivates and Includes the Customer

Supporting technologies

  • Two-way real-time communications with customer (AMI)

    • Real-time consumption

    • TOU pricing

  • Home Area Network (AMI)

  • Efficient/smart appliances


A smart grid motivates and includes customers

A Smart Grid “Motivates and Includes Customers”

Substation

Grid Operator

Price signals

sent to customer

Time-of-Use

rates measured

During peak

periods

Customers

adjust usage


Key characteristics rationale benefits technologies2

Rationale

Resist physical and cyber attacks

Minimize consequence and rapid restoration

Benefits

Reduce vulnerability

Key Characteristics: Rationale, Benefits, Technologies

Resists Attack

Supporting technologies

  • NERC CIP Standard

  • Physical security and monitoring at key sites

  • Encrypted communication

  • Security risk part of planning/design criteria


A smart grid resists attack

A Smart Grid “Resists Attack”

Substation


Key characteristics rationale benefits technologies3

Rationale

Limit momentary interruptions

Tight voltage tolerances

Clean power - no sags, surges, harmonics

Benefits

Improved customer productivity

Improved customer satisfaction

Improved voltage to customer

Improve PQ metrics (SARFI)

Key Characteristics: Rationale, Benefits, Technologies

Power Quality for the 21st Century

Supporting technologies

  • Advanced-loop scheme

  • Substation automation

  • Distribution Management System

    • System-wide volt/var control

  • High speed two way communications (AMI)

    • Real-time customer outage information

    • Control/indication across system

    • PQ enabled meters

  • Transient suppression equipment

  • Reduce customer induced PQ problems and improve PQ sensitivity of loads


A smart grid provides power quality for 21 st century

A Smart Grid provides “Power Quality for 21st Century”

Substation

Substation

Advanced Loop Scheme

High speed communications

and additional switching devices

Power Quality

Monitoring

Premium

Power

Programs


Key characteristics rationale benefits technologies4

Rationale

Enables wide variety of generation/storage options

Simplified interconnection process – “Plug-and-Play”

Enable profitability of small, distributed generation

Accommodate large renewable plants into transmission system

Benefits

Improved customer productivity

Improved customer satisfaction

Increase reliability and capacity

Environmental benefits

Renewables

Key Characteristics: Rationale, Benefits, Technologies

Accommodate all Generation and Storage Options

Supporting technologies

  • Two-way real-time communications with customer

    • Real-time pricing signals

    • TOU pricing (AMI)

  • Home Area Network (AMI)

  • Distribution Management System

    • Real-time control/indication of local generators

    • Support for PHEVs

    • Demand Side Management

  • Advanced planning tools


A smart grid accommodates all generation storage options

Substation

Grid Operator

Generator Control

& Indication

A Smart Grid “Accommodates All Generation & Storage Options”


Key characteristics rationale benefits technologies5

Rationale

Increased generation paths - more market participation

Leverage supply/demand of markets

Improved demand response

Benefits

Open access drives efficiency

Buyers and sellers brought together

Lower capital/operating costs

Key Characteristics: Rationale, Benefits, Technologies

Enable Markets

Supporting technologies

  • Two-way real-time communications with customer

    • Real-time pricing signals

    • TOU pricing (AMI)

  • Home Area Network (AMI)

  • Distribution Management System

    • Real-time control/indication of local generators

    • Support for PHEVs

  • Advanced planning tools


Key characteristics rationale benefits technologies6

Rationale

Near real-time data:

Improves condition assessment and Asset Management

Improves distribution operations decision making

Benefits

Lower capital/operating costs

Improved maintenance processes

Improved reliability

Environmental benefits

Lower losses

Key Characteristics: Rationale, Benefits, Technologies

Optimize assets and operates efficiently

Supporting technologies

  • Substation automation

    • Widespread uses of sensors & IEDs

  • CMMS

    • Advanced trending algorithms

    • Automated trouble notification

  • EMS

    • Contingency analysis

  • Green Circuit Initiative (EPRI)

  • Distribution Management System

    • Contingency analysis

    • System-wide volt/var control

  • Dynamic transmission lines ratings


A smart grid optimizes assets operates efficiently

A Smart Grid “Optimizes Assets & Operates Efficiently”

Substation

Substation

Grid Operator

Asset Manager

Investment Plan

Voltage & PF

Measures

Voltage & PF

Control

Equipment

Status

Load Data


Smart grid architecture

Smart Grid Architecture


Smart grid architecture and technology components source kema doe

Communications Infrastructure

Improved Decision Support

Advanced Control Methods

Executive Dashboards

T&D Operations

T&D Planning & Engineering

DMS

EMS

Systems

Planning

SAP CMMS

SAP

Asset Mgmt

Enterprise

Information

Integration

SAP XI

SCADA

DSM

Distribution Management

GIS

OMS

SAP WM

Procurement & Market Ops

Planning &

Forecasting

Bidding &

Scheduling

Trading &

Contracts

Customer Services

AMI

Head-end

MDUS

SAP CCS/CRM

Resource

Dispatch

Settlements

Integrated Communications

Advanced Meters

Communication Infrastructure

Home Area Network (HAN)

Smart In-home devices

  • SCADA

  • IEDs/Smart sensors

    • Equipment monitoring

    • Relays

    • PMUs-synchrophasors

Plant

Info

Substation

Automation

Advanced Metering Infrastructure

Distributed Generation

Transmission

Info

Advanced Components

Line sensors

Renewables

Distribution

Automation

PHEVs

  • Control/indication

    • Reclosers

    • Cap banks

  • Automated Switches

  • Smart sensors

  • Fault Indicators

Sensing & Measurement

Smart Grid Architecture and Technology Components (source: KEMA, DOE)


Ami definition and components

AMI Definition and Components


Meter reading has gone through several evolutionary cycles with amr more recently giving way to ami

Meter Reading has gone through several evolutionary cycles, with AMR more recently giving way to AMI.

Manual

Meter

Reading

Electronic Meter Reading

(EMR)

Off-Site Meter Reading

(OMR)

Automated Meter Reading (AMR)

Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI)

Gateway/

Home Automation

Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) is a term coined to differentiate bidirectional, high functionality technologies from older, automated meter reading (AMR) technologies.

According to FERC: Advanced metering is a metering system that records customer consumption [and possibly other parameters] hourly or more frequently and that provides for daily or more frequent transmittal of measurements over a communication network to a central collection point.


When utilities explore ami they realize that it enables key utility customer and societal benefits

Utility Operational Benefits:

Improved Outage Detection – smart meters automatically send information when power is removed and restored

Improved Meter to Billing Processes – moves from a manual to automated process

Faster Customer Inquiry Response Time – enables operators ready access to customer information

Fewer Customer Complaints, More Customer Control – provides system operator with near-real time information

Customer Service Connection Convenience – can remotely provision service

Active Tracking of Inactive Meters and Theft – allows verification that no consumption is measured on inactive locations

Customer and Societal Benefits:

Lower Energy Bills – by shifting consumption to off-peak periods and by conservation

Lower Market Price Benefits – reduces the need to purchase energy at higher spot prices

Deferred Generation Construction Costs – energy reduction can help avoid new generation

Smart In-home Systems – to provide energy information and consumption feedback

Distributed Generation Assets – to measure resources that feed or reduce grid requirements

Smart Grid Technologies – provides means to improve the performance and reliability of the grid

When utilities explore AMI, they realize that it enables key utility, customer and societal benefits


Ami technology overview supporting end to end processes

SAPUtilitiesExtensions “IS-U”

SAP Generic Applications

Customer

Relationship

Management

& Billing

Enterprise

Asset

Management

Energy

Capital

Management

Enterprise Management

& Business Support

SAP for Utilities

Business Process Platform

AMI Technology OverviewSupporting End-to-End Processes

+ Meter & Communications Infrastructure

+ Meter&Event Data Management

= Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI)

Meter Data

Unification &

Synchronizat.

System

Marketing&Sales

Customer Service

Billing

Premise Equipment

Home Area Network

Customer

Retail

“Smart”

Meter

Internet,

CTI, IVR,

Call Center

Measures, collects, transmits and stores end-user consumption. Configured remotely.

Local

Area

Network

(LAN)

Wide

Area

Network

(WAN)

HAN

Home

Automation

Network

Consumer

Products

Endpoint

Devices

Concen

trator

AMI

Head End

MDUS*

Central repository for meter&event data collected from all AMI Head Ends. Dispatches AMI Head Ends.

Accessed by all apps

responsible for processing the data

Most end-to-end

processes are

either directly or indirectly initiated

by the customer and are the consequence of or result in customer services and have an impact on the customers bill (supply contract)

  • Integration of

  • Marketing&Sales

  • Customer Service

  • Billing

  • EAM

  • to MDUS.

  • System of Record for all customer and commercial data and the related processes that leverage AMI.

Devices in the home that can be remotely updated and controlled by the utility.

Connected to meter via

gateway

Transmits data between meters and the collector.

Solution specific protocols. Emergingstandards.

Controls

Meters &

Communic.

Infrastructure

Manages

Meter & Event Data and forwards to MDUS

Transmits data between concentrator and AMI head end.

Solution specific protocols.

The network connecting consumer products and endpoint devices

Collects, stores and transmits messages to

and from

multiple meter points.

.. consuming

energy

Distribution

Equipment

Distribution Automation elements that use the same infrastructure to transmit or receive commands.


Enabling the smart grid with ami and sap at pse g

Meter Data Management ApplicationsCentral repository for meter data that facilitates operationalizing and monetizing the benefits of AMI

Customer Service Operations

  • Move in/Move out

  • On Demand Meter Read

  • Service Connect Disconnect

  • Meter Read Data Quality

  • Energy Diversion Identification

  • Date Validation, Editing, Estimation

Systems that could make use of Meter Data

Customer Programs

  • Mass Market Demand Response

  • Web Data Access

  • Billing Options & Tariffs

  • Automated Controls

Traditional, Value-added use of Meter Data

Metering Operations

  • AMI Asset Management

  • Meter O&M Management

  • AMI Installation Management

  • AMI Diagnostics and Error Flag Management

Non-Traditional, Value-added use of Meter Data

Distribution Operations & Planning

  • Outage event processing

  • Restoration Verification

  • Transformer Load Monitoring


Ami@sap system architecture

  • The SAP AMI solution consists of:

    • Meter Data Unification System (MDUS) provided by the MDM vendors and acting as a link between the AMI communications systems and SAP

    • Standard, tight integration between the MDUS and the SAP for Utilities modules

    • Enhancement to SAP for Utilities functionality to support new processes such as On-Demand Reads, Remote Connects/Disconnects

MDUS

SAP for Utilities

High Speed

Meter Data

Handler

Meter & Energy

Data Management

Meter&Energy

Data Repository

AMI

System

1

Meter & Device

Management

Meter & Device

Master Data

AMI Enabling

Marketing/Sales

(Self) Service

Billing/Invoicing

AccRec/C&C

. . . . .

Set of Enterprise Services

along defined Industry Standards

Meter Data

Repository

CRM/CIS Data

Intercompany

Data Exchange

Master Data

Synchronization

Command Mgr &

Event Handler

AMI System

Unification

Service Provider

Data

Enterprise Role: Full Service Provider

  • Enterprise Asset

  • Management

  • Service Mgmt

EAM Data

AMI

System

n

Enterprise Management

& Business Support

NetWeaver

SAP XI

NetWeaver

Enterprise Service

Repository

Dependent on vendor compatibility

MDM-Vendors



SAP

AMI-Vendors

AMI/MDM-Vendors

SAP

[email protected] System Architecture


Ami mdus mdm sap for utilities roles

AMI, MDUS (MDM), SAP for Utilities Roles

Advanced Metering Infrastructure

  • Smart Meter, Communication Infrastructure, AMI Head End System

  • Collecting/Forwarding Metering Data

  • Receiving/Forwarding Event Data

    MDUS

  • Specialized to manage very large volumes of (Basic Interval data) BID and very large volumes of events at highest speed and lowest TCO

  • Integrates and unifies several AMI Systems

  • Synchronizes master data for AMI Systems with those back office applications that are the System of Record for the respective master data

  • The System of Record for all BID collected through AMI Systems

  • Provides BID to applications (such as SAP)

  • Validates BID, Estimates missing BID

  • 24 x 7 availability

    SAP for Utilities

  • Responsible for Customer Relationship & Billing, Enterprise Asset Management and basic ERP processes

  • The System of Record for all „processing-relevant“ metering data

    • Selected/Limited volumesof BID that was read 1:1 from the MDUS (C&I/Small Retailers)

    • Discrete meter readings

  • Responsible for various Energy Capital Mgmt Processes (processing Non-BID Load Profiles)

  • Validates/estimates „processing relevant“ metering data


Ami and smart grid

AMI and Smart Grid


Smart grid and ami how ami reinforces the seven principal characteristics of the modern grid

Smart Grid and AMIHow AMI reinforces the seven principal characteristics of the Modern Grid

  • Motivation and inclusion of the consumer is enabled by AMI technologies that provide the fundamental link between the consumer and the grid.

  • Generation and storage options distributed at consumer locations can be monitored and controlled through AMI technologies.

  • Markets are enabled by connecting the consumer to the grid through AMI and permitting them to actively participate, either as load that is directly responsive to price signals, or as part of load resources that can be bid into various types of markets,

  • AMI smart meters equipped with Power Quality (PQ) monitoring capabilities enable more rapid detection, diagnosis and resolution of PQ problems.

  • AMI enables a more distributed operating model that reduces the vulnerability of the grid to terrorist attacks.

  • AMI provides for self healing by helping outage management systems detect and locate failures more quickly and accurately. It can also provide a ubiquitous distributed communications infrastructure having excess capacity that can be used to accelerate the deployment of advanced distribution operations equipment and applications.

  • AMI data provides the granularity and timeliness of information needed to greatly improve asset management and operations.


Smart grid and ami how ami relates to the 5 key technology areas of the modern grid

Smart Grid and AMIHow AMI relates to the 5 key technology areas of the Modern Grid

  • Integrated Communications: AMI provides the last and by far the most extensive link between the grid (including the consumer’s load) and the system operator.

  • Sensing and Measurement: Smart meters extensively measure system conditions (including PQ) down to the consumer level.

  • Advanced Control Methods: Consumer-side applications process information and initiate control actions locally (sometimes based on real time pricing). Distribution operations centers process AMI information and take control actions at the system and regional level.

  • Advanced Grid Components: AMI supports the deployment of distributed energy resources and can reduce the communication network costs of deploying pole-top distribution automation components.

  • Improved Interfaces & Decision Support:: AMI consumer portals, home area networks, and in-home displays provide the human interface and support consumer decision-making. Decision support at distribution operations centers is enabled by the additional information provided by AMI.


How sap supports ami and smart grid

Head-End

MDUS

How SAP supports AMI and Smart Grid


Enabling the smart grid with ami and sap at pse g

Demand Response and Distributed Energy Resources (DR/DER) are key areas of AMI and Smart Grid intersection

  • Time-based tariff programs enabled by AMI can help meet customers need for more efficiency

    • TOU linkage to Thermostat program are an effective means of helping consumers capture economic benefits

    • In-home display units can help customers better understand the connection between consumption and costs

    • Metering will be used for Measurement and Verification.

  • Distributed energy resources can be effectively managed, administered and incorporated into integrated reserve management programs: Metering will provide the requisite monitoring

  • Energy storage can be effectively dispatched to offset peaks; Metering will be used to capture the net results

  • Distributed Generation can be viewed, managed and controlled as required; Metering will provide net use calculations


Enabling the smart grid with ami and sap at pse g

Meters can provide “Last Gasp” messaging that indicates a power failure or restoration conditions; Back office applications can leverage this to supplement other network monitoring functions.

Linkage between meter physical and electrical addresses can be used for further circuit failure analsys

Power restoration notification and the ability to individually “ping” a meter for status can help ensure full restoration in a given area; This could help eliminate “nested” outage call backs for field crews.

ReliabilityAutomated outage and restoration processing at service points is a key function that can augment existing outage management processes.


Enabling the smart grid with ami and sap at pse g

Distribution Grid ManagementFeeder and Distribution Automation can be enabled through the AMI infrastructure and with selected upgraded meter functionality

  • Distribution Grid Management

    • Communication/control of distribution switches

    • Distribution transformer load management

    • Utilization of sensors for advanced functions/analysis (fault detectors, equipment/conductor temperatures, etc)

    • Contingency analysis and overload mitigation

    • Distribution system voltage management/control

  • Self Healing System/High Speed Communication for control/protection

    • High speed communication to support advanced sectionalizing schemes

  • Sensors and other IED’s are being included as AMI network peripherals

    • Many DA vendors are beginning to support open standards that are being used for AMI networks

    • This helps further justify AMI and DA infrastructure investments


Asset management improved equipment health assessment and associated asset management functions

Smart Grid and AMI Alignment

Asset ManagementImproved equipment health assessment and associated asset management functions

  • Regular data capture from field assets can be used to drive intelligence-based maintenance programs.

    • Linking status reports with other key parameters (such as temperature) can now provide additional criteria to be used for field operations

    • Preventative Maintenance routines can begin to displace more expensive Corrective Maintenance dispatches

    • Inventory management can be optimized based on more accurate models

  • Load data can be aggregated to identify key areas of interest

    • Actual field data from meters can be used to verify load design forecasts and limits

    • Critical conditions can be addressed prior to failure or overstressed states


Summary

Summary


Linking ami smart grid and sap

AMI Background

Linking AMI, Smart Grid, and SAP

  • AMI provides the link between the customer and the grid via:

    • Smart Meters and Home Area Networks

    • AMI communication network

  • The AMI communication network can be leveraged to support deployment of sensors and monitoring equipment

  • The MDUS and SAP are key components that need to be integrated to support the required AMI functionality


Ami and sap components leveraged to enable smart grid functions

AMI and SAP components leveraged to enable Smart Grid functions


Jerry casarella chief architect pseg jerry casarella@pseg com

Jerry Casarella

Chief Architect - PSEG

[email protected]


  • Login