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Produced within 2 weeks Anchored in culture Matrix remodeling in vivo post- grafting No immune rejection Avoid tissue morbidity PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Advantages of our tissue- engineered ACL substitute. Produced within 2 weeks Anchored in culture Matrix remodeling in vivo post- grafting No immune rejection Avoid tissue morbidity Implantation by arthroscopy (no scar ) Applications: Human Animal In vitro model

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Produced within 2 weeks Anchored in culture Matrix remodeling in vivo post- grafting No immune rejection Avoid tissue morbidity

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Advantages of our tissue-engineered ACL substitute

  • Producedwithin 2 weeks

  • Anchored in culture

  • Matrixremodeling in vivo post-grafting

  • No immune rejection

  • Avoid tissue morbidity

  • Implantation by arthroscopy (no scar)

  • Applications:

    • Human

    • Animal

    • In vitro model

    • Other ligament (tooth, etc.)


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Improvement of our tissue-engineered ACL substitute

  • Wecould use:

  • A stronger (acellular?) scaffold

  • A scaffoldanchoredwithsyntheticboneplugs

  • A scaffold made of collagenfibersmodifiedthroughnanotechnology

  • A scaffoldcontaining a biosensor to alert the athleteatknee joint limit range of movementduring training post-surgery

  • These are somepotentialimprovements to bedeveloped.


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NanomedicalBiologicalDevice

in development


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Collagens

-Comprised of polypeptide chains (alpha chains), eich in proline and hydroxyproline, that form a unique triple-helical structure that is 300 nanometers long;

-Each a-chain has a repeating amino acid structure of Gly-Xaa of

1.5 nanometers in diameter;

-There are more than 20 collagen types that exist in animal tissue;


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Collagens

-Comprised of polypeptide chains (alpha chains), eich in proline and hydroxyproline, that form a unique triple-helical structure that is 300 nanometers long;

-Each a-chain has a repeating amino acid structure of Gly-Xaa of

1.5 nanometers in diameter;

-There are more than 20 collagen types that exist in animal tissue;


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Potential applications in nanotechnology

In clinicalcontext, humancollagenswouldbepreferred over bovine collagensbecause the materialisolatedfromcowscan prompt an unwanted immune response in patients and itcanharbor animal pathogensthatmight infect humans.

This workmayalsoestablish the basis for applications in nanotechnology.


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Collagens

-Five types are known to form fibers: Types I, II, III, V, and XI.

-These types tend to self-assemble into periodic, cross-striated fibers, which can reach centimeters in length and tens of microns in diameter.

-Type I collagen: the predominant fiber-forming collagen type, found in bones, skin, teeth, and tendons.

-Type II collagen: the second most abundant, found in cartilaginous tissue, developing cornea, and vitreous humor.


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Potential applications in nanotechnology

In the context of nanotechnology, collagencanbeseen as a type of nanowirebecauseitisthin and long.

Coatedwithmetallic ions, humancollagenscouldform the basis of implantable electricsensors.

By attaching certain biologicalmolecules to the wire, itwouldbe possible to createsensorsthatmight, for example, quicklyalert a diabetic to fallinginsulinlevels.


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Potential applications in nanotechnology

We are currentlydeveloping the synthesis of human types I, II and III recombinant collagens to use them for tissue engineering, biomedical and nanotechnology applications.

Various types of humancollagen in vitro, produced the baculovirus system thatinvolves sf9 insectcells, willbeavailable in ourlaboratory to develop new scaffoldsthatpromote connective tissue repair and regeneration in vivo post-implantation.


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Bovine type I collagen scaffold

Lyophilized and rehydrated

© F.G./LOEX


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Thankyou!

To the co-researchers:

Dr. Réjean Cloutier, orthopedic surgeon, Université Laval, Québec;

Dr. Jean Lamontagne, orthopedic surgeon, Université Laval, Québec;

Dr. Nazrul Islam, in memoriam;

To ourgraduatestudents:

Mrs Ioana Diana Napa, M.Sc.

Mr. Pierrot Tremblay, M.Sc.

Mrs Anne-Marie-Belzil, M.Sc.

Mrs Lina Maria Robayo, M.Sc.


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Thankyou to ourcollaborators!

Dr. Sheila Laverty, Fac. Vet Med., Université de Montréal;

Dr. Bertrand Lussier, Fac. Vet Med., Université de Montréal;

Dr. Marc D. McKee, Fac. Med., McGill University;

Dr. Robin Poole, Fac. Med., McGill University

And others…


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Thankyousomuch!

Conference Co-Chairs:

Martine Rothblatt, Ph.D. Présidente directrice générale, UnitherBiotech, Inc.

Baruch S. Blumberg, M.D., Ph.D. Senior Advisor to the President, Fox Chase Cancer Center

Temple C. Fortson,

Editorial Assistant to the Chairman & CEO

United Therapeutics Corporation

Jenesis A. Rothblatt

Assistant Manager of Conferences & Virtual Worlds

United Therapeutics Corporation


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