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Unit 2 week 3 Day 2. Prudy’s problem. GRAMMAR. Jody. My. boxes. How. Daily Fix-It my friend jody has boxs all over her room. how can you do home work in this room. ?. homeowrk. Grammar. Simple sentence. A simple sentence has a subject and verb.

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Unit 2 week 3 day 2

Unit 2 week 3 Day 2

Prudy’s problem



Daily fix it my friend jody has boxs all over her room how can you do home work in this room

Jody

My

boxes

How

Daily Fix-It

my friend jody has

boxs all over her room.

how can you do

home work in this room

?

homeowrk


Grammar1
Grammar

  • Simple sentence

  • A simple sentence has a subject and verb

  • Many people visit Florida and Tennessee.

  • Compound sentence

  • A compound sentence has two sentences joined together with a comma before the words and, but or or.

  • My brother went to the zoo, but he did not have fun.


Grammar2
Grammar

subject

  • The subject of the sentence tells who or what the sentence is about.

  • My car and truck ran out of gas yesterday.

  • predicate

  • The predicate of the sentences tells what the subject is doing.

  • My grandparents came to visit last week.


Grammar3
Grammar

noun

  • names a person, place, thing, animal or idea

  • adjectives

  • describes a noun

  • sparkle colorful sharp dull


Grammar4
Grammar

verb

  • A verb is an action word. It shows action.

  • talk scream hit skip

  • sentence

  • A sentence is a complete thought. It begins with a capital letter and ends with a punctuation mark. All sentences must have a subject and predicate. They must make sense.


Grammar5
Grammar

  • common nouns

  • names any person, place, thing, animal or idea.

  • ice twig girl leaves boy dog city


Grammar6
Grammar

  • proper noun

  • Names a particular person, place, thing, animal or idea.

  • Proper nouns begin with a capital letter.

  • In proper nouns of more than one word, the first word and each important word are capitalized. The names of days, months, and holidays are proper nouns.

  • United States New Zealand July Pacific Ocean

  • Antarctica Washington Statue of Liberty


Grammar7
Grammar

  • singular nouns

  • It names one person, place, thing or animal.

  • ice twig girl leave boy dog city


Grammar8
Grammar

  • plural nouns

  • It names more than one person, place, thing or animal.

  • leaves socks boys dogs


Grammar9
Grammar

  • plural nouns

  • A plural noun names more than one person, place, thing, animal or idea. Most nouns add –s or –es to form the plural.


Grammar10
Grammar

  • irregular plural nouns

  • An irregular plural noun has a special form for the plural.


Grammar11
Grammar

  • irregular plural nous nouns

  • The singular noun, mouse, does not add –s or-es to form the plural. Instead it has a special form: mice.

  • leaves socks boys dogs

















Spelling words1
Spelling Words

  • sunglasses


Spelling words2
Spelling Words

  • football


Spelling words3
Spelling Words

  • homework




Spelling words6
Spelling Words

  • railroad


Spelling words7
Spelling Words

  • snowstorm



Spelling words9
Spelling Words

  • scarecrow


Spelling words10
Spelling Words

  • blueberry


Spelling words11
Spelling Words

  • butterflies


Spelling words12
Spelling Words

  • lawnmower


Spelling words13
Spelling Words

  • campground



Spelling words15
Spelling Words

  • toothbrush


Spelling words16
Spelling Words

  • thumbtack


Spelling words17
Spelling Words

  • earthquake


Spelling words18
Spelling Words

  • scrapbook


Spelling words19
Spelling Words

  • courthouse


Spelling words20
Spelling Words

  • whirlpool



Question of the Week

  • How can you get ideas to solve a problem?


Prudy s problem
Prudy’s Problem”

  • Fantasy is a fictional story in which at least one element in the story is not possible.


Characters
Characters

  • Remember the characters are the animal or people in the story.

  • The author don’t always tell us everything about a character. Sometimes we have to use clues in the story to tell us.


Setting
Setting

  • Remember the setting is where the story takes place.

  • You may have more than one setting in a story.


Open books to p 200
Open Books to p.200

  • Read to page 211

  • Ask questions about the story.

When you read a fiction story, it is important to know what the story is about in order to understand it.

While reading if you do not understand go back and read again.


Dictionary glossary
Dictionary/Glossary

  • A dictionary has word meanings. The words are listed in alphabetical order.

  • At the top of the outer corner of each two pages are two words called guide words. These are the first and last words on those two pages.


Collection
collection

  • A group of things gathered from many places and belonging together

  • We have a large collection of baseball cards.


Enormous
enormous

  • Very, very large; huge

  • The enormous cat is too heavy to lift.


Realize
realize

  • To understand something clearly

  • She didn’t realize that she forgot her coat.


Scattered
scattered

  • Separated and going in different directions

  • We scattered the fertilizer over the grass.


Shiny
shiny

  • Giving off or reflecting a bright light; bright

  • We waxed the truck until it was shiny.


Strain
strain

  • To draw tightly; to stretch too much

  • Be careful not to strain your back.


Clutter
clutter

  • Filled with objects in a messy way

  • The table was cluttered.


Indescribable
indescribable

  • Not able to be told about in words; beyond description

  • The ride in the hot air balloon was indescribable.


Inspiration
inspiration

  • A sudden good idea that solves a problem

  • She had an inspiration to write a song.


Compound words
Compound Words

sunglasses


Compound words1
Compound Words

blueberries



Compound words3
Compound Words

toothbrush


Compound words4
Compound Words

grandfather


Compound words5
Compound Words

whenever


Compound words6
Compound Words

sometimes


Compound words7
Compound Words

firehouse




Compound words10
Compound Words

sometimes


Compound words11
Compound Words

greenhouse


Compound words12
Compound Words

rainwater


Compound words13
Compound Words

everyone


Compound words14
Compound Words

scarecrow


Compound words15
Compound Words

sunflower


Compound words16
Compound Words

everybody


Compound words17
Compound Words

campground


Compound words18
Compound Words

lawnmower


Compound words19
Compound Words

snowstorm


Review
Review

  • The bugle sounded the wake-up call.

bu / gle

Syllable Pattern c + le

Where do you divide the word?






Cuticle
cuticle

The hard skin around the sides and base of a fingernail or toenail


Scuttle
scuttle

To hurry away




Cubicle
cubicle

A private work space surround by short walls


Griddle
griddle

Heavy, flat pan on which to cook food








The turkeys gobble softly every morning
The turkeys gobble softly every morning.

We took a shuttle from the parking lot to the stadium.

I carried a bottle of water in case I got thirsty.


O nomatopoeia
Onomatopoeia

  • Onomatopoeia can also add drama and make writing more lively and interesting.

  • A word that sounds like its meaning is an example of onomatopoeia.

  • Authors use onomatopoeia to reinforce the meaning.


O nomatopoeia1
Onomatopoeia

splat

  • These words are examples of onomatopoeia.

  • Authors use onomatopoeia to reinforce the meaning.

shush

zip

boom


moo

cuckoo

quack

honk

oink

boo

zoom

achoo


Main idea
Main Idea

  • One sentence that tells what the story is about.


Synonyms
Synonyms

  • A synonym is a word that has the same or almost the same meaning as another word.

  • Sometimes when you are reading you come across a word you don’t know.

  • The author may give you a synonym for the word. Look for a word that might be a synonym. It can help you understand the meaning of the word you don’t know.


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