Ones, Tens, Hundreds, Thousands

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Ones, Tens, Hundreds, Thousands

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1. Ones, Tens, Hundreds, Thousands The scales of interaction of undergraduate faculty with (Alliance) EOT-PACI activities This is an overview of Alliance EOT activities organized around the scale and mechanism of faculty participation. I will present examples of the following: Ones- Individual faculty through on-line materials and new ‘portals’; Tens-Groups of faculty interacting in workshops; Hundreds- Large cohorts of faculty through collaborative development and dissemination of disciplinary materials; Thousands- Potentially thousands of faculty through activities which may fundamentally change undergraduate curriculum.This is an overview of Alliance EOT activities organized around the scale and mechanism of faculty participation. I will present examples of the following: Ones- Individual faculty through on-line materials and new ‘portals’; Tens-Groups of faculty interacting in workshops; Hundreds- Large cohorts of faculty through collaborative development and dissemination of disciplinary materials; Thousands- Potentially thousands of faculty through activities which may fundamentally change undergraduate curriculum.

2. Ones Faculty and students interacting as individuals with PACI online materials. Portals Development and use of online materials

3. Tens Education workshops and group activities

4. Hundreds Partnership with consortia of educators BioQuest Curriculum Consortium – Ethel Stanley BioQUEST and EOT: Using Biology Workbench to bridge research and educational agendas by Ed Boyce Beloit, WISC -- For more than 14 years, the BioQUEST Curiculum Consortium based at Beloit College has developed biology learning tools that emphasize research-like problem solving experiences. This approach to learning requires that science education take advantage of the diverse range of software and computational resources available so that biology education accurately reflects the way real scientists study biological concepts and dynamic processes. BioQUEST's educational philosophy is that students should learn biology by using the same methods as practicing scientists. The BioQUEST reform efforts emphasize students learning through posing problems, developing answers to those problems, and persuading their peers as to the validity and utility of their answers. Those principals have guided BioQUEST as it has developed an extensive collection of peer reviewed biology curricula, datasets, software learning tools and supporting materials, for use primarily in undergraduate education. This year, BioQUEST became a funded member of the Education, Outreach and Training Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure (EOT-PACI), the outreach effort of the NSF's Partnerships for Advanced Computational Infrastructure (PACI) program. As an EOT-PACI partner, BioQUEST will coordinate a community of scientists who are developing educational resources to help faculty and students take advantage of the Biology Workbench, a Web-based research tool for biologists developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Through the project, BioQUEST hopes to encourage and support a diverse group of undergraduates as they get involved in the computational aspects of biological science. "In addition to working with the Biology Workbench team, our association with EOT-PACI has allowed us to make connections with an existing network of educators who are interested in bringing cutting-edge research into their classrooms," said Sam Donovan, assistant director of BioQUEST. For six years, BioQUEST has published the BioQUEST Library, a peer-reviewed CD-ROM containing software simulations, digital libraries, and analysis tools for educators for use on PC and Macintosh platforms. Materials developed as part of the collaboration with the Biology Workbench team will be published in the BioQUEST Library and are also available at http://glycine.ncsa.uiuc.edu/educwb "One of our primary goals is to identify computational resources that both allow students with less formal math backgrounds to begin exploring real scientific questions and also have the depth to support sophisticated use so that students are always challenged," said Donovan."We have found that bringing tools originally designed for research into classrooms can meet both these needs." That's important because graduate students who approach computational biology require a broad base of interdisciplinary scientific knowledge (e.g. biology, molecular chemistry, combinatorial mathematics, programming). Students who have a thorough grounding in all these disciplines from their formal studies are rare. Biology Workench Educational Enhancements BioQUEST's EOT-PACI work includes collaboration with scientists at NCSA, the University of California at San Diego, and Boston University to support faculty and student users who will develop and share educational modules online. The Education Enhancements to the Biology Workbench are designed to give a transparent introduction to the use of the Biology Workbench for learning and teaching biology at all levels. One of the goals of these modules will be to link the data resources and analysis tools available in the Biology Workbench to concrete biological questions. The early modules include resources to guide student investigations into the evolutionary relationships between fungi and animals and how changes in the HIV envelope protein can be used to understand the biology of AIDS. The Biology Workbench is a computational interface and environment that permits anybody with a Web browser to readily use bioinformatics, for research, teaching, or learning. The Education Enhancements to the Biology Workbench are designed to give a transparent introduction to the use of the Biology Workbench for learning and teaching biology at all levels. Online tutorials currently available from this project include such titles as:How to Use the Biology Workbench 3.0, The Biology WorkBench: A Molecular Biology Discovery Tool for Studying Evolution , Investigating the Molecular Evolution of Darwin's Finches, Rethinking the Tree of Life, Myoglobin as a Probe for Understanding Molecular Evolution , Study of Developmental Proteins in Drosophila, Sickle Cell Anemia , Cystic Fibrosis, and Comparing Primate Proteins Since its inception, the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium has been committed to outreach efforts. Through the collaborative development of the Education Enhancements to the Biology Workbench, BioQUEST aims to make the tools of computational biology and bioinformatics easily accessibly for teachers and students from diverse backgrounds, including women and underrepresented minorities. "Probably the most important part of this project is to help faculty and students understand the diversity of ways that molecular sequence and structure data can be used to study biological questions," said Donovan. Donovan explained that the project aims to provide a supportive environment where faculty from institutions around the nation will be able to share bioinformatics teaching ideas and materials that are under development and get feedback. "It is important to remember that bioinformatics is still an emerging field and it is having a profound impact on how biology is studied. There are lots of barriers to bringing new techniques and tools to undergraduate science education, so this project involves more than simply posting labs and problem sets on a Web site." BioQUEST and EOT: Using Biology Workbench to bridge research and educational agendas by Ed Boyce Beloit, WISC -- For more than 14 years, the BioQUEST Curiculum Consortium based at Beloit College has developed biology learning tools that emphasize research-like problem solving experiences. This approach to learning requires that science education take advantage of the diverse range of software and computational resources available so that biology education accurately reflects the way real scientists study biological concepts and dynamic processes. BioQUEST's educational philosophy is that students should learn biology by using the same methods as practicing scientists. The BioQUEST reform efforts emphasize students learning through posing problems, developing answers to those problems, and persuading their peers as to the validity and utility of their answers. Those principals have guided BioQUEST as it has developed an extensive collection of peer reviewed biology curricula, datasets, software learning tools and supporting materials, for use primarily in undergraduate education. This year, BioQUEST became a funded member of the Education, Outreach and Training Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure (EOT-PACI), the outreach effort of the NSF's Partnerships for Advanced Computational Infrastructure (PACI) program. As an EOT-PACI partner, BioQUEST will coordinate a community of scientists who are developing educational resources to help faculty and students take advantage of the Biology Workbench, a Web-based research tool for biologists developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Through the project, BioQUEST hopes to encourage and support a diverse group of undergraduates as they get involved in the computational aspects of biological science. "In addition to working with the Biology Workbench team, our association with EOT-PACI has allowed us to make connections with an existing network of educators who are interested in bringing cutting-edge research into their classrooms," said Sam Donovan, assistant director of BioQUEST. For six years, BioQUEST has published the BioQUEST Library, a peer-reviewed CD-ROM containing software simulations, digital libraries, and analysis tools for educators for use on PC and Macintosh platforms. Materials developed as part of the collaboration with the Biology Workbench team will be published in the BioQUEST Library and are also available at http://glycine.ncsa.uiuc.edu/educwb "One of our primary goals is to identify computational resources that both allow students with less formal math backgrounds to begin exploring real scientific questions and also have the depth to support sophisticated use so that students are always challenged," said Donovan."We have found that bringing tools originally designed for research into classrooms can meet both these needs." That's important because graduate students who approach computational biology require a broad base of interdisciplinary scientific knowledge (e.g. biology, molecular chemistry, combinatorial mathematics, programming). Students who have a thorough grounding in all these disciplines from their formal studies are rare. Biology Workench Educational Enhancements BioQUEST's EOT-PACI work includes collaboration with scientists at NCSA, the University of California at San Diego, and Boston University to support faculty and student users who will develop and share educational modules online. The Education Enhancements to the Biology Workbench are designed to give a transparent introduction to the use of the Biology Workbench for learning and teaching biology at all levels. One of the goals of these modules will be to link the data resources and analysis tools available in the Biology Workbench to concrete biological questions. The early modules include resources to guide student investigations into the evolutionary relationships between fungi and animals and how changes in the HIV envelope protein can be used to understand the biology of AIDS. The Biology Workbench is a computational interface and environment that permits anybody with a Web browser to readily use bioinformatics, for research, teaching, or learning. The Education Enhancements to the Biology Workbench are designed to give a transparent introduction to the use of the Biology Workbench for learning and teaching biology at all levels. Online tutorials currently available from this project include such titles as:How to Use the Biology Workbench 3.0, The Biology WorkBench: A Molecular Biology Discovery Tool for Studying Evolution , Investigating the Molecular Evolution of Darwin's Finches, Rethinking the Tree of Life, Myoglobin as a Probe for Understanding Molecular Evolution , Study of Developmental Proteins in Drosophila, Sickle Cell Anemia , Cystic Fibrosis, and Comparing Primate Proteins Since its inception, the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium has been committed to outreach efforts. Through the collaborative development of the Education Enhancements to the Biology Workbench, BioQUEST aims to make the tools of computational biology and bioinformatics easily accessibly for teachers and students from diverse backgrounds, including women and underrepresented minorities. "Probably the most important part of this project is to help faculty and students understand the diversity of ways that molecular sequence and structure data can be used to study biological questions," said Donovan. Donovan explained that the project aims to provide a supportive environment where faculty from institutions around the nation will be able to share bioinformatics teaching ideas and materials that are under development and get feedback. "It is important to remember that bioinformatics is still an emerging field and it is having a profound impact on how biology is studied. There are lots of barriers to bringing new techniques and tools to undergraduate science education, so this project involves more than simply posting labs and problem sets on a Web site."

5. Thousands Systemic Changes EdGrid: Modeling and Visualization in pre-service teacher education. – Lisa Bievenue http://www.eot.org/edgrid AN-MSI: Networking & Minority Institutions – Allison Clark (NCSA) AIHEC -- Mark Trebian

6. Teacher Preparation Reform

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