Deponent verbs
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Deponent Verbs. just like other verbs, but different. One thing to know. Deponent verbs are PASSIVE in form, and ACTIVE in meaning. Therefore:. Have ½ as many forms (no active forms!) Can only be used in an active sense To express the passive, you must use a different verb, i.e.

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Deponent Verbs

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Deponent verbs

Deponent Verbs

just like other verbs, but different


One thing to know

One thing to know

  • Deponent verbs are PASSIVE in form, and ACTIVE in meaning.


Therefore

Therefore:

  • Have ½ as many forms (no active forms!)

  • Can only be used in an active sense

  • To express the passive, you must use a different verb, i.e.

    hortātus sum (I encouraged) from hortor, hortārī, hortatus sum

    confirmātus sum (I was encouraged) from confirmo, confirmāre


How do i recognize them

How do I recognize them?

  • Only have 3 principle parts

  • Principle parts have passive endings

    i.e. loquor, loqui, locutus sum – to speak

  • Normal verb has 4 principle parts

    i.e. dico, dicere, dixi, dictus – to speak


How do you conjugate them

How do you conjugate them?

  • Exactly like normal passive verbs!!!

  • No new endings


Deponent verbs

Indicative


Deponent verbs

Subjunctive


But why

But why????

  • With many deponent verbs, the subject is experiencing the action (not doing it) just as if the verb were passive

  • patior, patī, passus sum = to suffer

  • vereor, verērī, veritus sum = to fear

  • queror, querī, questus sum = to complain


How do i tell which conjugation it is

How do I tell which conjugation it is?

  • Look at the infinitive

  • 1st = hortor, hortārī, hortatus sum

  • 2nd = vereor, verērī, veritus sum

  • 3rd = labor, labī, lapsus sum

  • 3rd IO = morior, morī, mortuus sum

  • 4th = orior, orīrī, ortus sum


But don t they have participles

But don’t they have participles?

  • Yes, yes, they do! (& that is a good question)

  • The Present Participle is normal 

  • Present Stem + ns / nt + 3rd decl endings

  • hortor, hortārī, hortatus sum

  • Present Stem = horta

  • Present Participle = hortans, hortantis

  • Translates = “encouraging”


I was asking about the other one

I was asking about the other one

  • Did these last year 

  • The Perfect Participle forms regularly

  • Last principle part (3rd for deponents)

  • + 1st & 2nd declension endings

  • Hortatus = having verbed

  • NOT having been verbed

  • NOT PASSIVE


Semi deponent verbs

Semi-Deponent Verbs

  • Verbs with trucks

  • Active forms for the Present, Imperfect, & Future

  • Passive forms for Perfect, Pluperfect, & Future Perfect

  • Therefore, normal principle parts for first 2, and a deponent 3rd principle part

  • audeō, audēre, ausus sum (to dare)

  • fiō, fierī, factus sum (to become)

  • gaudeō, gaudēre, gavisus sum (to rejoice)


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