2010 arizona english language arts standards
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2010 Arizona English Language Arts Standards. Welcome. Welcome. Introductions Ice Breaker Norms Logistics. Content Overview: the “Notebook”. Module 1: Overview and Introduction Module 2: Making Sense of the Appendices and the Alignment Document Module 3: The Quest for Rigor

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2010 Arizona English Language Arts Standards

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2010 arizona english language arts standards

2010 Arizona English Language Arts Standards

  • Welcome


Welcome

Welcome

  • Introductions

  • Ice Breaker

  • Norms

  • Logistics


Content overview the notebook

Content Overview: the “Notebook”

Module 1: Overview and Introduction

Module 2: Making Sense of the Appendices and the Alignment Document

Module 3: The Quest for Rigor

Module 4: Deconstructing the Standards

Module 5: Assessment and Content Frameworks


Overview and introduction

Overview and Introduction

  • Goal

  • Participants will connect and apply background experience with standards to expand their understanding of the history, purpose, process, design, and content of the 2010 Arizona ELA Standards.

  • Essential Questions

  • Why Common Core Standards?

  • What are the Instructional Shifts called for in the Common Core Standards?

  • Why is the design of the document important?

  • What is not covered by the AZ 2010 ELA Standards?

    • What are characteristics of students who are college and/or career ready?

    • How do I read this document?

  • (K-12)


The common core state standards initiative

The Common Core State Standards Initiative

  • Beginning in the spring of 2009, Governors and state commissioners of education from 48 states, 2 territories and the District of Columbia committed to developing a common core of state K-12 English-language arts (ELA) and mathematics standards.

  • The Common Core State Standards Initiative (CCSSI) is a state-led effort coordinated by the National Governors Association (NGA) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO).

  • www.corestandards.org


Why common core state standards

Why Common Core State Standards?

Preparation: The standards are college- and career-ready. They will help prepare students with the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in education and training after high school.

Competition: The standards are internationally benchmarked. Common standards will help ensure our students are globally competitive.

Equity: Expectations are consistent for all – and not dependent on a student’s zip code.

Clarity: The standards are focused, coherent, and clear. Clearer standards help students (and parents and teachers) understand what is expected of them.

Collaboration:The standards create a foundation to work collaboratively across states and districts, pooling resources and expertise, to create curricular tools, professional development, common assessments and other materials.


What is naep

WHAT IS NAEP?

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is the largest nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America's students know and can do in various subject areas. Assessments are conducted periodically in mathematics, reading, science, writing, the arts, civics, economics, geography, and U.S. history.

Since NAEP assessments are administered uniformly using the same sets of test booklets across the nation, NAEP results serve as a common metric for all states and selected urban districts. The assessment stays essentially the same from year to year, with only carefully documented changes. This permits NAEP to provide a clear picture of student academic progress over time.


2011 national assessment for educational progress 29 of arizona 8 th graders below basic

2011 National Assessment for Educational Progress29% of Arizona 8th graders below basic


2010 arizona english language arts standards

AZ State Test – 71% Proficient

NAEP – 28% Proficient


Feedback and review

Feedback and Review

  • External and State Feedback teams included:

    • K-12 teachers

    • Postsecondary faculty

    • State curriculum and assessments experts

    • Researchers

    • National organizations (including, but not limited, to):


Common core state standards evidence base

Common Core State Standards Evidence Base

  • Evidence was used to guide critical decisions in the following areas:

    • Inclusion of particular content

    • Timing of when content should be introduced and the progression of that content

    • Ensuring focus and coherence

    • Organizing and formatting the standards

    • Determining emphasis on particular topics in standards

    • Evidence includes:

    • Standards from high-performing countries, leading states, and nationally-regarded frameworks

    • Research on adolescent literacy, text complexity, mathematics instruction, quantitative literacy

    • Lists of works consulted and research base included in standards’ appendices


Common core state standards evidence base1

For example: Standards from individual high-performing countries and provinces were used to inform content, structure, and language. Writing teams looked for examples of rigor, coherence, and progression.

Common Core State Standards Evidence Base

Mathematics

Belgium (Flemish)

Canada (Alberta)

China

Chinese Taipei

England

Finland

Hong Kong

India

Ireland

Japan

Korea

Singapore

  • English language arts

  • Australia

    • New South Wales

    • Victoria

  • Canada

    • Alberta

    • British Columbia

    • Ontario

  • England

  • Finland

  • Hong Kong

  • Ireland

  • Singapore


Why is this important

Why is this important?

  • Currently, every state has its own set of academic standards, meaning public education students in each state are learning to different levels

  • All students must be prepared to compete with not only their American peers in the next state, but with students from around the world


Key advances

Key Advances

Reading

  • Balance of literature and informational texts

  • Text complexity

    Writing

  • Emphasis on argument and informative/explanatory writing

  • Writing about sources

    Speaking and Listening

  • Inclusion of formal and informal talk

    Language

  • Stress on general academic and domain-specific vocabulary


  • Key advances1

    Key Advances

    Standards for reading and writing in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects

    • Complement rather than replace content standards in those subjects

    • Responsibility of teachers in those subjects

  • Alignment with college and career readiness expectations


  • David coleman instructional shifts

    David Coleman: Instructional Shifts

    • English Language Arts Lead

    • Common Core State Standards Development

    • David Coleman Video

    • http://neric.welearntube.org/?q=node/146


    Instructional shifts to support students in literacy acquisition

    Instructional Shifts to Support Students in Literacy Acquisition

    • Balance of informational and literacy texts

    • Students access science, social studies, the arts and literature through text

    • At least 50% of what students read is informational

    Shift 1

    Balancing Informational and Literary Texts (PK-5)


    Instructional shifts to support students in literacy acquisition1

    Instructional Shifts to Support Students in Literacy Acquisition

    • Content area teachers emphasize literacy experiences in their planning and instruction

    • Students learn through domain –specific texts in science, social studies and technical subject classrooms.

    • Students are expected to learn from what they read

    Shift 2

    Building Knowledge in the Disciplines (6-12)


    Instructional shifts to support students in literacy acquisition2

    Instructional Shifts to Support Students in Literacy Acquisition

    • Students read the central, grade appropriate text around which instruction is centered

    • Teachers create more time and space in the curriculum for close careful reading of text

    • Teachers provide necessary scaffolding

    • Text Complexity Matters

    Shift 3

    Staircase of Text Complexity


    Instructional shifts to support students in literacy acquisition3

    Instructional Shifts to Support Students in Literacy Acquisition

    • Students have rich and rigorous conversations dependent on a common text

    • Teachers insist that classroom experiences stay deeply connected to the text on the page

    • Students develop habits for making evidentiary arguments both in conversation and writing to assess comprehension

    Shift 4

    Text-Based Answers


    Instructional shifts to support students in literacy acquisition4

    Instructional Shifts to Support Students in Literacy Acquisition

    • Writing emphasizes the use of evidence to inform or make an argument

    • Students develop skills through written arguments that respond to the ideas, events, facts, and arguments presented in the texts they read

    Shift 5

    Writing from Sources


    Instructional shifts to support students in literacy acquisition5

    Instructional Shifts to Support Students in Literacy Acquisition

    • Students build needed vocabulary to access grade level complex texts

    • Focus strategically on the comprehension of words such as discourse, generation and theory, and less time on literary terms (onomatopoeia)

    • Teachers insist students use academic words in speaking and writing

    Shift 6

    Academic Vocabulary


    Introduction

    Introduction

    • 2010 Arizona English Language Arts Standards Key Design Considerations


    Key design considerations

    Key Design Considerations

    • College and Career

    • Readiness Anchor Standards

    • K-5

    • Comprehensive

    • English Language Arts (includes Social Studies, Science and Technical Text)

    • 6-8, 9-10, 11-12

    • Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

    • 6, 7, 8, 9-10, 11-12

    • ELA

    • Content

    Appendices A, B, and C


    Key design considerations1

    Key Design Considerations

    • Focus on results rather than means

    • Integrated model of literacy

    • Research and media skills blended into the Standards

    • Shared responsibility for students’ literacy development

    • Focus & coherence in instruction and assessment


    The introduction

    The Introduction

    Tab: Common Core Introduction


    2010 arizona english language arts standards

    What is NOT Covered

    by the

    2010 Arizona English Language Arts Standards


    Activity 1 handout what is not covered by the standards

    Activity 1: Handout What is not covered by the standards?

    • The Standards define what all students are expected to know and be able to do, not how teachers should teach.

    • Standards focus on what is most essential, they do not describe all that can or should be taught.

    • The Standards do not define the nature of advanced work for students.

    • The Standards set grade-specific standards but do not define the intervention methods or materials.

    • Standards do not define the full range of supports appropriate for English language learners and for students with special needs.

    • While the ELA and content area literacy components described are critical to college and career readiness, they do not define the whole of such readiness.


    What are the characteristics of students who are college and career ready

    What are the characteristics of students who arecollege and career ready?


    Activity 2 handout what are characteristics of students who are college and or career ready

    Activity 2: HandoutWhat are characteristics of students who are college and/or career ready?

    • List on your handout the characteristics of students who are college and career ready.

    • Share at your table. Look for commonalities.

    • Be ready to share with the entire group.


    Characteristics of college and career ready students

    Characteristics of College and Career Ready Students

    • Demonstrate independence and the ability to work collaboratively.

    • Possess strong content knowledge.

    • Respond to the varying demands of audience, task and purpose.

    • Comprehend as well as critique.

    • Use evidence effectively to support ideas.

    • Evaluate sources for credibility.

    • Identify and understand bias.

    • Utilize technology and digital media strategically and capably.

    • Understand other perspectives and cultures.


    2010 arizona english language arts standards

    • How to Read This Document


    2010 arizona english language arts standards

    Appendices A, B, and C


    Appendices

    Appendices

    • Appendix A:

      • Articulates the research that supports the need for increased text complexity K-12.

    • Appendix B:

      • Applies understanding of text complexity to identify grade level text samples and corresponding performance tasks.

    • Appendix C:

    • Identifies exemplars of student writing.


    English language arts

    English Language Arts

    Reading

    RL - Reading Standards for Literature

    RI - Reading Standards for Informational Text

    RF - Reading Standards: Foundational Skills (K-5)

    RH - Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies (6-12)

    RST- Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects (6-12)

    Writing

    W - Writing Standards

    WHST - Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    and Technical Subjects (6-12)

    Speaking and Listening

    SL- Speaking and Listening Standards

    Language

    L - Language Standards

    STANDARDS “FORMULA” = strand, grade, standard; EXAMPLES: SL.2.4 W.7.1


    Labels of the ela standards

    Labels of the ELA Standards

    Strand

    Strand

    Reading Standards for Literature

    RL

    Kindergarten:

    Key Ideas and Details

    Cluster

    Cluster

    • 1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

    • 2. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.

    • With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

    Craft and Structure

    • Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.

    • Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).

    • With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling a story.

    Standards


    Coding

    Coding

    • Reading Literature

    • RL.1.3

    • 1.RL.3

    Grade Level

    Strand

    Standard


    Activity 3 handout building the foundation

    Activity 3: Handout Building the Foundation

    • Materials: Ringed Standards

      • Select a Cluster and Standard from the College and Career Ready Anchor Standards (CCR).

      • Find the Cluster and Standard match in the Standards.

    • How do the grade level standards build the necessary foundation to help students meet the College and Career Readiness Anchors?

    • 2. What are the implications for instructional decisions and grade level expectations?


    Who is responsible

    Who is Responsible?

    CCR mostly taught

    by one teacher

    CCR taught by multiple

    teachers

    CCR taught by multiple

    teachers

    CCR taught by multiple

    teachers


    2010 arizona english language arts standards

    Reading:

    Text Complexity and the

    Growth of Comprehension

    • Equal emphasis is on the sophistication of what students read and the skill with which they read.

    • Whatever they are reading, students must also show a steadily growing ability to discern more from and make fuller use of text.

    • Standard 10 defines a grade-by grade

    • “staircase” of increasing text complexity.


    Overview of the reading strand

    Overview of the Reading Strand

    • Progressive development of reading comprehension; students gain more from what they read

      • Emphasize the importance of grade-level texts that are of appropriate difficulty and are increasingly sophisticated

        • Standards for Reading Foundational Skills (K-5)

        • Reading Standards for Literature (K-12)

        • Reading Standards for Informational Text (K-12)

        • Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies (6-12)

        • Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects (6-12)


    Grade level progression in reading

    Grade-Level Progression in Reading

    CCR Reading Standard 3: Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.


    Grade level progression in reading1

    Grade-Level Progression in Reading

    CCR Reading Standard 3: Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.


    Overview speaking listening and language strands

    Overview: Speaking & Listening and Language Strands

    • Speaking and Listening

    • Focus on speaking and listening in a range of settings, both formal and informal – academic, small-group, whole-class discussions

    • Emphasize effective communication practices.

    • Require interpretation and analysis of message as presented through oral, visual, or multimodal formats.

      • Language

      • Include conventions for writing and speaking.

      • Highlight the importance of vocabulary acquisition through a mix of conversation, direct instruction, and reading.

      • Address language in the context of reading, writing, speaking and listening.

      • Media and Technology are integrated throughout the standards.


    Speaking and listening

    Speaking and Listening

    • Note on range and content of student speaking and listening.

    • Do provide ample opportunities for rich, structured conversation as part of a whole class, in small groups and with a partner.

    • Ensure that students contribute accurate, relevant information and respond to what others have said.

    • Provide opportunities to analyze and synthesize ideas in various domains.


    Example of grade level progression for speaking and listening

    Example of Grade-Level Progression for Speaking and Listening

    CCR S&L Standard 6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.


    Language standards embedded within the strands

    Language Standards: Embedded Within the Strands

    Elements of the Language Standards in the Reading, Writing, and Speaking and Listening Strands


    Overview of the writing strand

    Overview of the Writing Strand

    • Expect students to compose arguments and opinions, informative/explanatory pieces, and narrative texts.

    • Focus on the use of reason and evidence to substantiate an argument or claim.

    • Emphasize ability to conduct research – short projects and sustained inquiry.

    • Require students to incorporate technology as they create, refine, and collaborate on writing.

    • Include student writing samples that illustrate the criteria required to meet the standards (See standards’ appendices for writing samples).


    Example of grade level progression in writing

    Example of Grade-Level Progression in Writing

    CCR Writing Standard 7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.


    Overview of standards for history social studies science and technical subjects

    Overview of Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

    • Reading Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

      • Ensure knowledge of domain-specific vocabulary.

      • Analyze, evaluate, and differentiate primary and secondary sources.

      • Synthesize quantitative and technical information, including facts presented in maps, timelines, flowcharts, or diagrams

    • Writing Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

      • Write arguments on discipline-specific content and informative/explanatory texts.

      • Use data, evidence, and reason to support arguments and claims.

      • Use domain-specific vocabulary.


    Essential questions

    • Essential Questions

      • Why is the design of the document important?

      • What is not covered by the AZ 2010 ELA Standards?

      • What are characteristics of students who are college and/or career ready?

      • How do I read this document?

    Essential Questions

    • Why Common Core Standards?

    • What are the Instructional Shifts called for in the Common Core Standards?

    • Why is the design of the document important?

    • What is not covered by the AZ 2010 ELA Standards?

      • What are characteristics of students who are college and/or career ready?

      • How do I read this document?


    Activity 4 handout stop and go

    Activity 4: HandoutStop and Go

    • Using the document as a foundation for building teacher understanding about the 2010 Arizona ELA Standards, think about what you have learned and what you will take back to your site or classroom?


    Resources

    Resources

    • Common Core State Standards:

    • www.ade.az.gov/standards/commoncorestandards/default.asp

    • Center for K-12 Assessment & Performance Management at ETS

    • Assessment Article

    • www.k12center.org

    • Achieve-Information about PARCC

    • www.achieve.org/

    • Arizona Department of Education (Common Core)

    • http://www.azed.gov/standards-practices/common-core-state-standards/


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