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School Vandalism, School Bullying, School Rules? Safer Schools Partnership Strategies With Mayfield School and Hampshire Constabulary PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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School Vandalism, School Bullying, School Rules? Safer Schools Partnership Strategies With Mayfield School and Hampshire Constabulary Reducing Crime and Disorder in the Community Police Constable Marcus Cator and Steve Hawkins. WHY !

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School Vandalism, School Bullying, School Rules? Safer Schools Partnership Strategies With Mayfield School and Hampshire Constabulary

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School Vandalism, School Bullying, School Rules?

Safer Schools Partnership Strategies

With Mayfield School and Hampshire Constabulary

Reducing Crime and Disorder in the Community

Police Constable Marcus Cator and Steve Hawkins


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WHY !

Mayfield School is the largest secondary school for youths aged 11 to 16 years of age in Portsmouth, historically suffering from a reputation of persistent antisocial behaviour and was considered a magnet for criminal activity. Mayfield was a school which parents did not wish to send their children too. It was in “Special Measures” after the last inspection by Ofsted, schools inspectorate. Crime in the district of Copnor was identified through scanning and customer surveys, as causing a significant fear of crime in the community. Mayfield School was identified as being at the heart of the problem.


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  • Scanning

  • Portsmouth City is the 3rd most densely populated City in Europe with up to 450,000 people on the island at any one time.

  • According to national statistics in 2001 the resident population of Copnor measured 13,303 of which 22.3% were below 16 years of age, compared to the national average of 20.2%. In 2003 the population had risen to 16,490.

  • The average number of crimes recorded at all 10 secondary schools in Portsmouth over 2 years was 40.

  • Mayfield School had 96 crimes reported within the same time frame

  • This project was designed to reduce crime and disorder within Mayfield and the community

  • Partnership strategy identified and established to tackle the concerns identified


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The Area to Tackle

Copnor and North End

Portsmouth


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Residents Perception of the Problems


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Analysts Comparison of Crimes


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  • Analysis

  • Analyst support identified police costs of response and investigation into 96 crimes at Mayfield School over 2 years was approximately £42,000 ($79,000 U.S.)

  • Incidents reported involved “Nuisance or Youth concerns” with large groups of 40 – 50 roaming the streets, drunk, abusive, aggressive, causing damage and crime.

  • Community surveys established a fear of crime dependant upon the youth culture and their persistent misbehaviour

  • A significant lack of communication and understanding between agencies identified a lack of intelligence exchange.

  • National Intelligence Model and National Crime Recording Standards not being met.


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Details Of Analysis

As a snapshot of time we saw that from 01/01/2004 – 07/07/2004 there were 67 incidents reported to Police at Mayfield School, 48 incidents during school hours, 19 outside of hours.

These consisting of:-

Assaults x 3

Public Order incidents x 4

Burglary x 5

Missing children x 3

Intrusion and damage to the site x 22

Alarm activations x 4

Thefts of mobile phones and bicycles x 26


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The Underlying Causes

  • Issue 1 - Assaults / Bullying within school

  • Issue 2 - Crime and damage on site during and after hours causing

  • general Anti Social Behaviour in the area.

  • Issue 3 - Theft within Schools.

  • Issue 4 - Exclusion and Truancy


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Response

Improved Partnerships between organisations

Communication with the student body

Introduction of established crime reduction strategies

Positive media support marketing success to the community


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  • Issue 1 - Assaults / Bullying in Schools

  • Advertising a “No Bullying Campaign”.

  • Posters in corridors with names and contact details of key individuals.

  • Information available on the School website.

  • Adopting a Multi-agency approach to dealing with incidents.

  • Students encouraged to report bullying.

  • Counseling services for perpetrators.

  • Appropriate rule setting, set up and maintained.

  • Mentors utilised from existing school council and support put in

  • place for victims.


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  • Issue 2 - Crime and damage on site during and after hours

  • General Anti Social Behaviour in the area.

  • Application for a Designated area in order to Disperse problem groups, increased Police patrols and community engagement.

  • Upgrading site security

  • Improved CCTV

  • Raising awareness of the problems and taking ownership

  • Re-securing the site.


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  • Issue 3 - Theft within Schools.

  • Tackle Mobile phone thefts, currently 2 a week stolen

  • Tackle theft of bicycles, currently 2 a month stolen

  • Tackle theft of staff personal property

  • Use recognised schemes

  • Property Marking

  • Personal Ownership

  • Students taking responsibility in school

  • Taking the responsibility home


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  • Issue 4 - Exclusion and Truancy

  • Partnership strategies within schools

  • Counselling and advice service

  • Regular patrols identifying key offenders

  • Targeted approach through intelligence

  • Parents taking ownership


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Assessment as of Sept 2005, 2 Years later.

39% reduction in Police attendance to the school

95% reduction in thefts of Mobile phones

100% reduction in Criminal Damage

36% reduction in Police investigation costs

42% reduction in student exclusions


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Statistics before and after implementation in 2003


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Benefits to date

Acceptance and recognition by the youth as a part of their culture

Improved relations with all members of the partnership

National Intelligence Model and National Crime Recording Standards are fully supported

Community have identified less crime

Accountability to the community

Local, County and National recognition for the work

In 2005 investigations had reduced by 36%. An efficiency saving of £4793.40 ($9,015.49 US) for the Police after a significant rise in reporting of crime in 2004.


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Lessons Learned

Agreed protocol needs to be identified at the early stages

Do not promise what you cannot deliver

You must have the right person for the job

The youths can see right through you

Respect yourself and learn to respect others

Punishment is not a cure


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USEFUL REFERENCE SITES

www.crimereduction.gov.uk/ssh01.htm

www.popcenter.org/Problems/problem-bullying.htm

www.crimereduction.gov.uk/nim1.pdf

www.together.gov.uk/category.asp?c=185

www.crimereduction.gov.uk/stolengoods3.htm

www.socialexclusionunit.gov.uk/downloaddoc.asp?id=65

www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/sie/documents/revised2005guidance.pdf

www.popcenter.org/Problems/problem-vandalism.htm

www.popcenter.org/problems.htm

www.popcenter.org/library.htm


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Thank you for your attention,

we hope you feel enthused and empowered

Marcus Cator and Steve Hawkins

[email protected]

[email protected]


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