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Fairfax County Human Services. Response to Challenges in the Community. Selected Trends in Service Utilization and Demand June 2001.

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selected trends in service utilization and demand june 2001

Fairfax County Human Services

Response to

Challenges in the Community

Selected Trends in Service Utilization and Demand

June 2001

slide2

Prepared by the Fairfax County Department of Systems Management for Human Services12011 Government Center Parkway, Suite 946Fairfax, Virginia 22035

To obtain an additional copy of this report, please contact the

Department of Systems Management for Human Services at (703) 324-5638

or e-mail your request to [email protected]

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Fairfax County Human Services: Response to Challenges in the CommunitySelected Trends in Service Utilization and Demand
  • This report presents utilization and trend data for selected services and programs offered by Fairfax County Human Services. This report seeks to illustrate the scope of human services and to highlight selected trends in service demand over time. It is not intended to provide a comprehensive picture of every human service offered by the County, nor does it provide information on program performance or client outcomes. (For a comprehensive picture of Human Services’ program, budget, and performance data, see the Fairfax County Human Services FY 2001 Performance Budget)
  • The report is organized by seven “Community Challenges,” or statements of basic goals that local government shares a legal or ethical responsibility to achieve. For each challenge, there is a desired “Quality of Life” statement as well as an “Action Statement” that summarizes the Human Services approach to achieving the desired quality of life.
    • Challenge 1: Providing Assistance to Promote Independence
    • Challenge 2: Ensuring Safe, Affordable Housing
    • Challenge 3: Supporting Families and Individuals in Crisis/Preventing Abuse & Neglect
    • Challenge 4: Protecting the Public Health
    • Challenge 5: Addressing Alcohol, Drug, Mental & Physical Health Issues
    • Challenge 6: Responding to Crime in the Community
    • Challenge 7: Providing Community-wide and Targeted Supports to Prevent Social Isolation and Neighborhood Deterioration.
  • Please note that with a few exceptions, this report presents information only on services provided directly by Fairfax County Human Services and some contract agencies, and does not include data on the many essential human services provided by other community-based organizations, private providers, and non profit agencies.
fairfax county human services response to challenges in the community
Fairfax County Human Services:Response to Challenges in the Community
  • Challenge 1:Lack of Assistance to Promote Independence
  • Quality of Life Statement: Fairfax County is a community in which families and individuals are able to achieve their maximum potential for self-sufficiency.
  • Action Statement:Take steps to ensure that families and individuals have the supports needed to achieve their maximum potential for self-sufficiency.
total benefits applications received fiscal years 1991 to 2001 estimate

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Total Benefits Applications ReceivedFISCAL YEARS 1991 to 2001 (estimate)
  • Benefits Programs (Food Stamps, TANF, and Medicaid) are a significant indicator of human need within the County. The decline in applications for benefit programs reflects general economic conditions as well as state and federal policy changes.

*Because of a lack of available data from the state, FY 2000 and 2001 reflect applications processed rather than applications received.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

fairfax works welfare reform in fairfax county

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Fairfax Works: Welfare Reform in Fairfax County
  • Beginning in July 1995, Virginia reformed its AFDC, now TANF, program by modifying the requirements and changing the name to Virginia Independence Program (VIP). VIP included a work requirement component, Virginia Initiative for Employment Not Welfare (VIEW), which began in April 1996.
  • As of February 2001, 211 participants were currently enrolled in VIEW and receiving Temporary Assistance to Needy Families or job follow up services. Of those 211 participants, 124 are employed with an average monthly wage of $1,222.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

average cases under care tanf afdc and food stamps fiscal years 1991 to 2001 est

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Average Cases Under Care: TANF (AFDC) and Food StampsFISCAL YEARS 1991 to 2001 (Est)
  • The continuing decline in benefit caseloads is in line with state and national trends, and likely reflects both general economic conditions and policy changes such as Food Stamp eligibility and Welfare Reform. Since the work requirement initiative of Welfare Reform was implemented in April 1996, the TANF caseload has decreased by 68%.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

average medicaid cases under care fiscal years 1991 to 2001 est

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Average Medicaid Cases Under CareFISCAL YEARS 1991 to 2001 (Est)
  • Fluctuations in the number of Medicaid cases over the past decade are due largely to legislative changes expanding or restricting eligibility for the program. As of February 1997, Medicaid eligibility for TANF recipients was no longer automatic. As TANF recipients now have separate Medicaid determinations, their increased case counts are reflected beginning with FY 2000.
  • Children enrolled in the Children’s Medical Insurance Program (CMSIP) are not included in the counts below (1,726 in FY00; 2,692 estimated in FY01)

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

child care assistance program number of children served fiscal years 1991 to 2000

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Child Care Assistance Program: Number of Children ServedFISCAL YEARS 1991 to 2000
  • Since 1991, enrollment in the Child Care Assistance Program has increased by 65%. Even with the growth of the program, there are approximately 1,145 children on the waiting list.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services, Office for Children. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

children approved for free and reduced school lunches june 1991 to 2000

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Children Approved for Free and Reduced School LunchesJUNE 1991 to 2000
  • Of the almost 156,000 children enrolled in the Fairfax County Public Schools during the 1999-2000 school year, 28,980 (or 18.6%) were approved for free or reduced-price lunches on the basis of their family’s income. This rate is down from the FY99 rate of 19.4%.

Source: Fairfax County Public Schools. Includes Fairfax County and the City of Fairfax.

family self sufficiency program

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Family Self-Sufficiency Program
  • Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) is an innovative HUD initiative which combines Section 8 and Public Housing subsidy programs with support services to assist families in achieving independence from all welfare and federal subsidy programs over a five year period.
  • FSS allows families to benefit from increases in employment income. As employment income increases, the housing authority creates interest-earning escrow accounts, equal to the increase in rent which resulted from increased earnings, that provide a savings “nest egg” for use in moving off subsidy programs. Participants must sign a five-year contract that outlines goals to eliminate barriers to self-sufficiency, such as employment or education. Participants receive the escrow funds upon successful completion of their contract.
  • As of March 2001, 31 Section 8 tenants and 11 Public Housing tenants participate in the FSS program. To date, 71 families have graduated from the program.
  • 36 participants have escrow accounts, 29 of which are active.

Source: Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority. * One participant still receives a child care subsidy.

home based care monthly caseload and clients served fiscal years 1992 to 2000

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Home Based Care: Monthly Caseload and Clients ServedFISCAL YEARS 1992 to 2000
  • Home Based Care provides homemaker and companion services for elderly persons and adults with disabilities who live alone or with family members, preventing costly and inappropriate institutionalizations. Eighty percent of Home Based Care clients are 60 years of age or older.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

senior centers operations and meals served fiscal years 1997 to 2000

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Senior Centers: Operations and Meals ServedFISCAL YEARS 1997 to 2000
  • There are 13 Senior Centers located throughout the County which provide community services, noon time meals, transportation, opportunities to socialize, and a variety of activities for senior citizens.

NOTE: Attendance and number of meals served are variable each year due to cancellation days for snow and ice. Number of meals served reflects only meals served at Senior Centers.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Community and Recreation Services . Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

home delivered meals program persons and meals served fiscal years 1992 to 2000

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Home Delivered Meals Program: Persons and Meals ServedFISCAL YEARS 1992 to 2000
  • The Home Delivered Meals program provides a variety of nutritious hot meals to home-bound adults. In recent years, the program has also offered liquid meal supplements (e.g., Ensure) as well as hot food. Need for the program exceeds the County’s ability to provide services.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

* The decrease in FY 96 is due to changes in state guidelines for counting liquid supplements as meals. ** Served more clients for a shorter period of time.

adult day health care number of participants served fiscal years 1992 to 2001 estimate

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Adult Day Health Care: Number of Participants ServedFISCAL YEARS 1992 to 2001 (estimate)
  • Adult Day Health Care Centers are located in Annandale, Lewinsville, Lincolnia, and Mount Vernon. The Herndon Harbor will open in May 2001.
  • There is a growing need for long-term care options in Fairfax County. Between 1995 and 2000, the number of persons over age 85 is estimated to have increased by 32%. By 2010, it is estimated that there will be a 150% increase in this age group.

Source: Fairfax County Health Department. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

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Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Care Network for Seniors:Number of Initial Assessments and Clients EnrolledFISCAL YEARS 1992 to 2000
  • The Care Network for Seniors Program is a multi-agency long term care initiative that provides case management services to senior citizens age 60 and over. Case management through the Care Network connects eligible clients with appropriate services, based on a complete evaluation of their needs.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

transportation for human services programs fastran and ridership one way rides fiscal year 2000

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Transportation for Human Services Programs:Fastran and Ridership (One-Way Rides)FISCAL YEAR 2000
  • Fastran provides door-to-door transportation for residents with physical and cognitive disabilities and for senior citizens. The program serves those who have no other means of access to programs and services sponsored by Human Services, and complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The program provided over 542,000 rides in FY 2000.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Community and Recreation Services. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

mental retardation waiting list for residential services based on fiscal year 2001 survey data

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Mental Retardation: Waiting List for Residential ServicesBASED ON FISCAL YEAR 2001 SURVEY DATA
  • There are 631 individuals waiting for placement in a residential setting.
  • In 32% of the cases, these individuals are living with only one caregiver. In 12% of the cases, caregivers are over age 70.
  • 37% of individuals on the waiting list who are living with their families are in a “high-risk” situation; that is, the family feels they cannot continue with their current care arrangement.

Source: Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board

Data as of 3/27/01

mental retardation residential services fiscal years 1993 to 2000

Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Mental Retardation: Residential ServicesFISCAL YEARS 1993 to 2000
  • Residential Services includes group homes, supported apartments, sponsored placements, domiciliary care, and supported living arrangements. The waiting list reduction in 1995 was due to an increase in capacity and a review of the residential needs of persons on the waiting list.

Source: Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board Note: Persons served included persons funded with Medicaid waiver.

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Providing Assistance to Promote Independence

Special Education Graduates Entering Mental Retardation ServicesPROJECTIONS FOR FISCAL YEARS 2000 to 2005

96

88

87

87

86

82

* These consumers do not require CSB funding for Vocational Services upon graduation.

** These consumers require funding for both Vocational Services and Case Management upon graduation.

Source: Fairfax County Public Schools (Projections as of Spring 2001)

fairfax county human services response to challenges in the community21
Fairfax County Human Services: Response to Challenges in the Community
  • Challenge 2: Ensuring the Availability of Safe, Affordable Housing
  • Quality of Life Statement: Fairfax County is a community that has quality housing opportunities for families and individuals in all income ranges.
  • Action Statement: Take affirmative steps to preserve and increase the availability of housing opportunities that are affordable to persons with low to moderate incomes.
housing assistance programs public housing and section 8

Ensuring the Availability of Safe, Affordable Housing

Housing Assistance Programs:Public Housing and Section 8
  • There are 1,064 public housing units at 31 locations across the County, including both multifamily and townhouse communities. Public Housing generally operates at 99% rate of occupancy -- the 1% vacancy accommodates the modest unit turnover that occurs throughout the year.
  • The FCRHA also administers approximately 3,060 Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers that provide assistance to tenants seeking housing in privately owned units throughout the County. Section 8 assistance is also provided to the owners of over 1,500 rental units that were developed specifically to serve eligible households.
  • There are also over 2,300 other federally-assisted housing units that were developed to serve the elderly, disabled, low income individuals and families.
  • In addition to federally-assisted units, there are almost 4,400 housing units that receive “assistance” via special tax and/or financing provisions. These include privately-owned tax-credit projects, Moderate-Income Direct Sales, the First-Time Buyer Program, and the Fairfax County Rental Program, among others.

Source: Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority (FCRHA)

waiting lists for assisted housing february 2001

Ensuring the Availability of Safe, Affordable Housing

Waiting Lists for Assisted Housing FEBRUARY 2001
  • Of the 7,500 people on waiting lists for Public Housing, Section 8, and the Fairfax County Moderate Income Rental Program, nearly 60% are wage-earners, over 14% receive Social Security, and 3% receive public assistance (TANF). 75% of those on the waiting lists have less than $24,840 income per year, which is 30% of the area median income.

20.0%

10%

4%

Source: Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority. Includes Resident of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

fairfax county human services response to challenges in the community24
Fairfax County Human Services:Response to Challenges in the Community
  • Challenge 3:Supporting Families and Individuals in Crisis; Preventing Abuse and Neglect
  • Quality of Life Statement:Fairfax County is a community that promotes family and individual stability, in which all people are free from financial, emotional, or physical crises. It is a community in which all people are safe from abuse, neglect and exploitation.
  • Action Statement:Provide crisis intervention, stabilization and support services to prevent or alleviate financial, physical, or emotional crisis. Prevent the incidence of and protect people of all ages from harm due to abuse, neglect, and exploitation.
coordinated services planning emergency assistance fiscal years 1998 to 2000

Supporting Families & Individuals in Crisis; Preventing Abuse & Neglect

Coordinated Services Planning: Emergency Assistance FISCAL YEARS 1998 to 2000
  • In FY 2000, Coordinators answered over 50,000 calls to the Human Services number (222-0880), representing nearly 27,000 requests for assistance. Coordinators assist clients by providing broad-based assessments and linkage to community-based and County services with a focus on prevention and self-sufficiency. The types of requests for crisis assistance listed below represent approximately one-third of the total types of requests received by CSP.

* CSP staff began conducting intake interviews for the County’s emergency shelters in 1999, resulting in an increase in the number of shelter requests handled by CSP.

Source: Department of Systems Management for Human Services.

services to the homeless number of persons served in shelters fiscal years 1994 to 2000

Supporting Families & Individuals in Crisis; Preventing Abuse & Neglect

Services to the Homeless:Number of Persons Served in Shelters FISCAL YEARS 1994 to 2000
  • Homelessness affects both single individuals and families with young children. While the total number of persons served decreased slightly from FY 1999 to FY 2000, the number of persons in families increased by over 11% while the number of single individuals served decreased by 11%.

2,383

2,271

2,230

2,016

2,099

1,961

Total Number of Persons Served

1,696

Source: Department of Family Services; Virginia SHARE Report

services to the homeless persons served in alternative shelter placements fiscal years 1994 to 2000

Supporting Families & Individuals in Crisis; Preventing Abuse & Neglect

Services to the Homeless:Persons Served in Alternative Shelter PlacementsFISCAL YEARS 1994 to 2000
  • When space is not available at County-funded shelters and there are no other housing alternatives, homeless families with children are served in motels.
  • The decline in the number of homeless persons served in motels from FY 94 to FY 97 was attributed both to increases in homeless prevention programs operated by County staff and community-based organizations, as well as to increased capacity in transitional housing. However, in FY 99 a lack of affordable housing in the area resulted in a significant increase in the demand for shelter, longer shelter stays, and more motel placements.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

child protective services number of investigations per year fiscal years 1990 to 2000

Supporting Families & Individuals in Crisis; Preventing Abuse & Neglect

Child Protective Services:Number of Investigations per YearFISCAL YEARS 1990 to 2000
  • CPS investigations fluctuate from year to year with no predictable pattern. The number of investigations remained consistent in FY 98 and FY 99, and decreased by almost 10% in FY 00.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

foster care and adoption average number of children in care per month fiscal years 1991 to 2000

Supporting Families & Individuals in Crisis; Preventing Abuse & Neglect

Foster Care and Adoption:Average Number of Children in Care per MonthFISCAL YEARS 1991 to 2000
  • From FY 96 to FY 00, there has been a 27% decrease in the average number of children in Foster Care each month. The length of time a child is in foster care has decreased from 3.1 years in 1998 to 2.85 years in 2000. These trends are the result of intensive prevention, early intervention efforts, and new legal requirements that strengthen permanency planning efforts for foster children and their families.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

adult protective services number of investigations per year fiscal years 1991 to 2000

Supporting Families & Individuals in Crisis; Preventing Abuse & Neglect

Adult Protective Services:Number of Investigations per YearFISCAL YEARS 1991 to 2000
  • The typical APS client is elderly, white, female, and lives alone or with a relative. However, 21% of those referred were under the age of 60. These individuals have a range of disabilities, including mental retardation, multiple sclerosis, head and spinal cord injuries, cancer, and AIDS.
  • The decrease in investigations conducted in FY 1996 was consistent with state-wide trends.
  • In FY 2000, 68% of the cases investigated resulted in a person needing protective services.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services.

Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

fairfax county human services response to challenges in the community31
Fairfax County Human Services: Response to Challenges in the Community
  • Challenge 4: Threats to the Public Health
  • Quality of Life Statement:Fairfax County has a healthy community environment which is free of threats to the public health.
  • Action Statement:Provide protection from communicable diseases and environmental hazards, and provide related prevention services to improve the public health.
slide32

Responding to Threats to the Public Health

Communicable Disease Control:New Cases of Tuberculosis and Rates per 100,000CALENDAR YEARS 1991 to 2000
  • New Cases are persons diagnosed with active TB during the calendar year. Following these cases requires directly-observed therapy to ensure compliance and control the development of drug-resistant TB. The increase in cases in 1996 may reflect an improved reporting system. The increase in the 2000 Fairfax rate is representative of an overall increase in TB cases across Northern Virginia.

Rates per 100,000

Fairfax Rate

VA Rate

Source: Fairfax County Health Department. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

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Responding to Threats to the Public Health

Communicable Disease Control:Persons Receiving Preventive Treatment for TuberculosisFISCAL YEARS 1992 to 2000
  • Preventive treatment ensures that persons infected with Tuberculosis will not progress to active disease. The Health Department screens all refugees and immigrants for TB. The decline in persons receiving preventive treatment in FY 95-96 is due in part to fewer refugees coming into the area. The increase in FY 97 reflects, in part, the result of contact investigations where large number of persons were screened. The decrease in FY 98 through FY 00 reflects current recommendations to start only those persons on preventive treatments who are committed to complete the course of therapy.

* Data through 12/31/99

Source: Fairfax County Health Department. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

communicable disease control sexually transmitted disease cases treated fiscal years 1991 to 2000

Responding to Threats to the Public Health

Communicable Disease Control:Sexually Transmitted Disease Cases Treated FISCAL YEARS 1991 to 2000
  • Cases of sexually transmitted diseases increased slightly during FY00, reflecting statewide trends.

Source: Fairfax County Health Department. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

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Responding to Threats to the Public Health

Communicable Disease Control:New Reported Cases of HIV+ and Rates per 100,000CALENDAR YEARS 1991 to 2000
  • All new cases of HIV+ are reported to the VA Health Department each year. Rates of HIV and AIDS in Fairfax County are lower than the state rate.

Rates per 100,000

VA Rate

Fairfax Rate

Source: Fairfax County Health Department. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

* Data through 6/30/00.

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Responding to Threats to the Public Health

HIV Case Management Program: Caseloads of Persons with Asymptomatic HIV InfectionFISCAL YEARS 1991 to 1999
  • The Heath Department operates a case management clinic for persons infected with HIV who are not yet displaying the symptoms of illness with AIDS. The clinic monitors health status, promotes the time period of healthy life, and prevents the spread of infection.

Source: Fairfax County Health Department. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

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Responding to Threats to the Public Health

AIDS/HIV Program: Cumulative Cases of AIDS(By Numbers of Deaths and Persons Living with AIDS)1990 through 2000

1,327

1,209

1,194

Cumulative Cases of AIDS

1,135

1,066

43%

874

783

559

427

346

57%

Source: Virginia Department of Health and CDC Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

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Responding to Threats to the Public Health

Environmental Health Services: Community Health & Safety Number & Type of Complaints Investigated per YearFISCAL YEARS 1996 to 2000
  • The Housing Branch of Environmental Health investigates complaints and takes actions to control sub-standard and blighted housing; disease-carrying rodents; trash and garbage complaints; and other public health hazards.

* Housing includes Property Maintenance and Lead. **General Environmental includes animal waste, birds, bats, insects, safety hazards, hazardous materials, indoor air quality, air pollution, and biological agents.

Source: Fairfax County Health Department.

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Responding to Threats to the Public Health

Environmental Health Services: Consumer Services Number and Type of Inspections and InvestigationsFISCAL YEARS 1996 to 2000
  • The Consumer Services Selection conducts safety and public health inspections of public establishments, such as restaurants, swimming pools, and other public facilities.

* Reduction in the number of establishments in 1997 was due to deregulation of 215 child care facilities, 31 pet shops, and 600 hair salons. Source: Fairfax County Health Department

fairfax county human services response to challenges in the community40
Fairfax County Human Services: Response to Challenges in the Community
  • Challenge 5:Addressing Alcohol, Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues
  • Quality of Life Statement:Fairfax County is a community in which all people have access to a wide variety of affordable services for mental health, alcohol and drug abuse, and physical health care.
  • Action Statement:Contribute to the availability of mental health services, alcohol and drug treatment services, and physical health care services that are affordable to persons with low to moderate incomes.
alcohol and drug services residential and day treatment services fiscal years 1993 to 2000

Addressing Alcohol & Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues

Alcohol and Drug Services: Residential and Day Treatment ServicesFISCAL YEARS 1993 to 2000
  • There continues to be a waiting list for alcohol and drug residential treatment. The length of time can be up to six months, primarily for individuals awaiting residential treatment services at Cornerstones.

Source: Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board

youth served in alcohol and drug programs fiscal years 1995 to 2000

Addressing Alcohol & Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues

Youth Served in Alcohol and Drug ProgramsFISCAL YEARS 1995 to 2000
  • Alcohol and Drug Services programs for youth include prevention, early intervention, case management, outpatient, day treatment, and residential services. With the additional local, federal, and state resources received, there continues to be an increased number of youth identified as needing services. Prevention and early intervention services are only available for a small number of youth.

Source: Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board

ads outpatient and case management services fiscal years 1994 to 2000

Addressing Alcohol & Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues

ADS Outpatient and Case Management ServicesFISCAL YEARS 1994 to 2000
  • Alcohol and Drug Services is serving youth and adults with increasingly severe substance abuse problems. The past five years show a decreasing number of persons served through increasing levels of treatment intensity.

Source: Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board

residential services for individuals with mental health problems fiscal years 1994 to 2000

Addressing Alcohol & Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues

Residential Services for Individuals with Mental Health ProblemsFISCAL YEARS 1994 to 2000
  • As the level of clients’ problems increases (shown by the Global Assessment of Functioning scores), the number of persons served is reduced in order to provide the intensity and comprehensiveness of services that are required.
  • As of June 1, 2000 there were 463 persons waiting for residential mental health treatment services.

Source: Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board

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Addressing Alcohol & Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues

Community Services BoardEarly Intervention Services: Number of Infants ServedFISCAL YEARS 1995 to 2000
  • The Early Intervention Office provides services to infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families from birth to three years. Infants are eligible to remain in the program until age three when they transfer into the school system.

Source: Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board

community health care network number of primary care patients and visits fiscal years 1994 to 2000

Addressing Alcohol & Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues

Community Health Care Network:Number of Primary Care Patients and Visits FISCAL YEARS 1994 to 2000
  • Over one-quarter of all household earning less than $25,200 have at least one person without health insurance. The Community Health Care Network provides primary medical care for low income families without health insurance. Services are provided at the North County, Bailey’s and South County Health Centers. The North County Health Center began operation in February 1996. Currently, over 20,000 persons are enrolled program-wide.

Source: Fairfax County Health Department Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

community health care network client characteristics march 2001

Addressing Alcohol & Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues

Community Health Care Network:Client CharacteristicsMARCH 2001

The CHCN serves a wide variety of patients:

  • 72% of patients are wage earners or dependents of wage earners.
  • 9% receive some form of public assistance, including TANF, GR, SSI, or Refugee Assistance.
  • 17% have no income, and the remaining 2% receive income from other sources.

Age Distribution

Primary Language

* Other languages include Mandarin Chinese, Cambodian, French, Thai, Laotian, Hindi and Punjabi.

Source: Fairfax County Health Department. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church.

maternity services number of teen births up to age 19 fiscal years 1992 to 2000

Addressing Alcohol & Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues

Maternity Services: Number of Teen Births (Up to Age 19)FISCAL YEARS 1992 to 2000
  • The number of teen births among Health Department clients in FY00 remains lower than in the early 90’s, reflecting County-wide and national trends. From 1990 to 1998, the County-wide teen birth rate dropped from 26 per 1,000 to 14.4 per 1,000. The drop may also reflect efforts to prevent first and second pregnancies among teens, such as the Resource Mothers program. The % increase between FY99 and FY00 is almost equal to the % increase in the total number of maternity cases.

Source: Fairfax County Health Department Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

low birthweight births per 100 health department fairfax co and virginia rates 1993 to 2000

Addressing Alcohol & Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues

Low Birthweight Births per 100:Health Department, Fairfax Co., and Virginia Rates1993 to 2000
  • The majority of the approximately 2,000 Health Department Maternity Patients are at risk for low birth weight babies ( up to ~5.5 lbs), due to socioeconomic, demographic, or medical factors. Through early, continuous prenatal care and case management, the Health Department rate has historically been almost that of the County as a whole.

N/a

N/a

N/a

N/a

Source: Fairfax County Health Department Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

women infants and children wic nutritional program program caseload fiscal years 1991 to 2000

Addressing Alcohol & Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues

Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Nutritional Program: Program CaseloadFISCAL YEARS 1991 to 2000

Source: Fairfax County Health Department Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

slide51

Addressing Alcohol & Drug, Mental and Physical Health Issues

Immunization Completion Rate for Two Year Olds:County Rate* vs. Health Department Rate FISCAL YEARS 1993 to 2000
  • The Health Department provides immunizations for over 20,000 children every year. Although the immunization program does not have income-eligibility guidelines, the program primarily serves children from lower-income families. The goal for the year 2000 is an immunization rate of 90%.

* County Rate based on retrospective study done in the Schools.

Source: Fairfax County Health Department Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

fairfax county human services response to challenges in the community52
Fairfax County Human Services: Response to Challenges in the Community
  • Challenge 6:Responding to Crime in the Community
  • Quality of Life Statement:Fairfax County is a community that is safe from the threat of crime.
  • Action Statement:Administer a justice system that delivers a just and equitable response to juvenile and domestic crimes, and which reduces these crimes by addressing the factors that lead to crime in the community.
community and recreation services teen centers

Responding to Crime in the Community

Community and Recreation Services: Teen Centers
  • CRS operates nine teen centers (one in each magisterial district). Teen centers are charged with providing teens and at-risk youth with a variety of positive recreation activities; enhancing leisure and life skills; providing a safe and structured environment; energizing teens -- and the community that supports them; and reinforcing positive character behavior by establishing healthy and supportive peer and adult relationships.
  • In the past year, Teen Center participation has grown by almost 50%, from 38,257 to 57,237. Female attendance has increased by over 80%, from 8,554 to 15,538. Participation in a variety of activities (other than basketball) has also increased significantly.

Ethnic Diversity of Enrollees

Teen Center Activities

Source: Fairfax County Department of Community and Recreation Services

number of complaints for juveniles and adults

Responding to Crime in the Community

Number of Complaints for Juveniles and Adults
  • Between 1992 and 2000 the number of non-traffic complaints to Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court has increased by 20%, while the total population has increased by only 13%.
  • Cases include: Delinquency; Children in need of services and supervision; custody; visitation and support determination; criminal offenses among family members; and adults charged with offenses against minors.

*

Source: Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court Fairfax County and City of Fairfax.

*In FY 2000, the shift to the State’s CMS management information system has caused a decrease in the number of adult cases recorded in JUVARE.

offenses against persons complaints for adult offenders fiscal years 1991 to 2000

Responding to Crime in the Community

Offenses Against Persons Complaints for Adult OffendersFISCAL YEARS 1991 to 2000
  • Complaints against adults involving offenses against persons have more than doubled since 1991. Most of these cases involve intra-family violence.

Legislature expands definition of “family”

Police adopt proactive domestic violence policy

Source: Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court Fairfax County and City of Fairfax.

violent juvenile offenses fiscal years 1987 1995 and 2000

Responding to Crime in the Community

Violent Juvenile OffensesFISCAL YEARS 1987, 1995, and 2000
  • Simple assault represents the majority of juvenile offenses against persons. Serious offenses against persons and weapons offenses have decreased substantially since 1995.

Source: Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court Fairfax County and City of Fairfax.

average daily population in secure detention facilities fiscal years 1991 to 2000

Responding to Crime in the Community

Average Daily Population in Secure Detention FacilitiesFISCAL YEARS 1991 to 2000
  • From 1993 to 1997, the Court’s Secure Detention Facility had the capacity to house 55 juveniles at any given time. However, the need for secure detention spaces outstripped this supply. An expanded center opened during FY 98, bringing capacity to 121 beds.

Capacity

Source: Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court Fairfax County and City of Fairfax.

juvenile probation services average monthly caseload fiscal years 1991 to 2000

Responding to Crime in the Community

Juvenile Probation Services: Average Monthly CaseloadFISCAL YEARS 1991 to 2000
  • Since FY 1991, juvenile probation counselors at the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court have operated with average monthly caseloads that exceed the state standards. Although the Board of Supervisors approved three additional counselors in FY 1994 and again in FY 1999, caseload growth has continued to exceed the caseload standard.

BOS approves 3 new positions

BOS approves 3 new positions

Caseload Standard (30)

Source: Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court Fairfax County and City of Fairfax.

residential service alternatives fiscal years 1995 and 2000

Responding to Crime in the Community

Residential Service AlternativesFISCAL YEARS 1995 and 2000
  • On any given day, there are more than 250 youth in residential facilities and programs. In FY 2000, a total of 2,583 placements were made to the programs listed below. The overall utilization rate for the Court’s residential programs was 100% in FY 2000.

Source: Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court Fairfax County and City of Fairfax.

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Responding to Crime in the Community

Mental Health and Alcohol & Drug Services Provided: Fairfax County Adult Detention CenterFISCAL YEARS 1995 to 2000
  • The MH Forensic Program offers emergency crisis intervention, evaluations, and case management for inmates who are seriously mentally ill, at risk for suicide, or dually-diagnosed. ADS Court Services offers evaluations, jail-based treatment and an intensive addictions program. The number of persons waiting for services continues to increase due to staff shortages.

Source; Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board

fairfax county human services response to challenges in the community61
Fairfax County Human Services: Response to Challenges in the Community
  • Challenge 7:Providing Community-Wide and Targeted Supports to Prevent Social Isolation and Neighborhood Deterioration
  • Quality of Life Statement:Fairfax County is a community that supports and builds on the strengths of individuals, families and neighborhoods.
  • Action Statement:In collaboration with the community, provide targeted responses to the social, housing, and civic needs of residents in neighborhoods at risk of social or economic deterioration, as well as broad-based supports for community and family well-being.
housing and community development revitalization and blight abatement efforts

Providing Community-wide and Targeted Supports

Housing and Community Development: Revitalization and Blight Abatement Efforts
  • HCD administers a variety of revitalization efforts for Fairfax County. Programs target both commercial and residential areas as well as individual properties throughout the County. To date, revitalization plans have been adopted by the Board of Supervisors for seven designated areas:
  • Richmond Highway/Route 1
  • McLean Business District
  • Annandale Central Business District
  • Lake Anne
  • Central Springfield
  • Baileys Crossroads/Seven Corners
  • Merrifield
  • The Community Improvement Program is a revitalization component designed to upgrade and preserve older moderate income residential communities. This program utilizes a combination of bond funds and homeowner investment to make public improvements to streets, sidewalks, and storm drainage systems.
  • Revitalization efforts include a Blight Abatement Program to rid residential and commercial areas of deteriorated structures. This program is complemented by a Tax Abatement Program that provides tax credits to property owners for the rehabilitation, renovation, or replacement of older obsolete buildings
  • Other initiatives include community single-point of contact services and improvements to the land development process.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Housing and Community Development

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Providing Community-wide and Targeted Supports

Community and Recreation Services: Total Attendance & Daily Participation at Community CentersFISCAL YEARS 1992 to 2000
  • Six community centers provide opportunities for leisure, socialization, and personal growth by offering affordable recreation and enrichment activities in the community.

*Starting in 1998, the methodology used to calculate daily attendance at community centers was changed to reflect unduplicated counts.

Source; Fairfax County Department of Community and Recreation Services. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

head start program number of children served fiscal years 1990 to 2000

Providing Community-wide and Targeted Supports

Head Start Program:Number of Children ServedFISCAL YEARS 1990 to 2000
  • Since 1990, enrollment in Head Start has increased by 49%. Due to funding constraints, demand for the program cannot be accommodated. Currently, there are 379 children on the waiting list.

* The decrease in FY97 was the result of mandated smaller classroom sizes. ** The decrease in FY99 was the result of closing Edison House.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services, Office for Children. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

subsidized support for special needs adoptions fiscal years 1992 to 2000

Providing Community-wide and Targeted Supports

Subsidized Support for Special Needs AdoptionsFISCAL YEARS 1992 to 2000
  • Subsidized adoption enables permanent placement of children with special needs by providing services and supports to adoptive families until the children reach the age of 18 or 21.
  • Supports include referral to, and payment of , home-based services, counseling and treatment, child care, health and educational services, therapy, and special transportation services. The number of children getting subsidies grows as additional children are adopted. The program is supported with state and federal funds.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services. Includes Residents of Fairfax Co. and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

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Providing Community-wide and Targeted Supports

Elementary-Age Summer Recreation: Location, Attendance and Number of Children ServedFISCAL YEARS 1993 to2000
  • The summer Rec-PAC program currently serves over 6,519 children at 54 locations.
  • Rec-PAC is the primary source of supervised summer activities for an estimated 65% of the children registered in the program.
  • Approximately 29% of the children are from families with incomes less than $36,000.
  • Summer 1996 marked the first time the program operated at complete cost-recovery basis. The program recovered 100% of its costs in Summer 1998.

54

99

98

98

67

59

47

54

# Locations

Source: Department of Community and Recreation Services. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

school age child care program number of children served fiscal years 1990 to 2000

Providing Community-wide and Targeted Supports

School-Age Child Care Program:Number of Children ServedFISCAL YEARS 1990 TO 2000
  • Since 1990, enrollment in the School-Age Child Care Program has increased by 79%. Due to increased demand for the program, SACC opens additional sites each year. Even with the expansion, there are still 1,052 children on the waiting list.

Source: Fairfax County Department of Family Services, Office for Children. Includes Residents of Fairfax County and Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church

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