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Who Are the Students You Teach Today?. YouTube - A Vision of K-12 Students Today. Who are you?. The Mature Generation , people born before 1946 The Baby Boomers , people born between 1946 - 1964 Generation X , people born between 1964 - 1979 Generation Y ,

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who are you
Who are you?
  • The Mature Generation,

people born before 1946

  • The Baby Boomers,

people born between 1946 - 1964

  • Generation X,

people born between 1964 - 1979

  • Generation Y,

people born between 1980 - 2000

mature generation
Mature Generation
  • All have some sort of military connection
  • Many have lived through the Great Depression
  • They remember the Big Band error and Jazz
  • Delayed gratification - this is the generation that Gen Y most trust
  • They consider themselves “average Joe’s”
  • Pay in cash - purchase a car and drive it forever.
mature generation5
Mature Generation
  • Characteristics:
    • Teamwork, commitment, sacrifice, discipline, financial and social conservatism, and loyalty.
    • They are often mechanically savvy but not so much literate in today’s technology
who are these children
Who Are These Children?

Boomers

(1946–1964)

Gen X

(1964–1979)

Gen Y

(1979–2000)

Tweens

(10–12 year olds today)

boomers generations
Boomers Generations
  • First generation to have television at home. (Leave it to Beaver, Father Knows Best, scenes from the Vietnam War and assassination of JFK, Woodstock, Watergate, hippies, free sex, drugs
  • Transistor radios - listened to Rock n Roll, Motown, and the Beatles
  • Expansion of individual freedom and support for civil rights, civil unrest and change, followed by inflation and corporate downsizing.
  • They measure their work ethic in how many hours per week they work, they are workaholics (46 - 64 hrs)
boomers
Boomers
  • Largest part of the workforce. To be successful you must pay your dues - no shortcuts
  • Characteristics:
    • Idealism, individualism, self-improvement, and high expectations. They built the first computers and wireless communication devices.
generation x
Generation X
  • They are the “Me generation, the generation of status-seekers.
  • Fast Good, designer cloths, the war on drugs, the fight against AIDS, the Space Shuttle, falling of the Berlin Wall, first women Supreme Court Justice,
  • Music: pop, rock, country, punk and rap.
  • They saw their parents divorce in ever greater numbers. They are the first generation of the latch-key kids.
  • They watched their parents reinvent themselves because of jobs lost in hostile takeovers and corporate downsizing.
generation x10
Generation X
  • This is the first generation that was shaped by mass media.
  • This is also the first generation that may fall to match or surpass the economic status of their parents
  • Characteristics:
    • Pragmatism, conservativeness, diversity, entrepreneurial sprit, and appreciation for the quality of life and work/life balance. They are tech savvy, but because they may have diminished expectations, they may fell alienated, cynical, and detached. Leading to a value of self-reliance.
generation y
Generation Y
  • The Millennials have been influenced by the electronic age more than any other generation.
  • First generation to do homework on desktop computers. They carry their own cell phones, download music to IPods, and they do their shopping online.
  • They are influenced by wars in the Middle East and the destruction of the World Trade Center, a booming economy, a more diversified society, casual dress code in business settings, Ritalin, debates about gun control, reality TV, and distance education.
generation y12
Generation Y
  • Characteristics:
    • Neotraditionalism, ritual, optimism, technological adeptness, and compartmentalized both in work and life.
secretary paige launches no child left behind act
Secretary Paige Launches No Child Left Behind Act

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

Photo Credit: Associated Press/World Wide Photo

slide14

The Millennials

  • 27% of Americans, 70 Million People
  • Grew up in the longest peace time and largest economic expansion in history
  • Most diverse in U.S. history, 34% minorities

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

149 billion
$149 billion

The 47 million people who make up the 13 to 24 age group spend an estimated $149 billion, 15% of which is spent online, and their influence on other people extends by as much as five times their spending, according to the findings.

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) 2003

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

values
Values
  • Parents96% get along with their parents
  • 75% share their values

Education

80% think it is cool to be smart

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

Source: Millennials Rising: the Next Great Generation

values17
Values

Spiritual

78% believe religion is important

Activists

60% engaged in community

service

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

Source: Millennials Rising: the Next Great Generation

concerns
Concerns
  • Selfishness
  • Lack of respect for authority
  • Wrongdoing by politicians
  • Lack of parental discipline
  • Courts that care too much about the rights of criminals

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

Source: Millennials Rising: the Next Great Generation

style
Style
  • Hyper-communicators

— 89% online-surpass adult users

— 20% own cell phones

  • Goal oriented multi-taskers

— 34% of time online while watching television or listening to music

  • Self inventors/entrepreneurs

— 50% of HS seniors in San Diego County believe they will start their own business

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

Source: MTVs Second Annual Leisure Time Study, 1999; Horizon, 1999; PC Magazine, May 9, 2000

internet use
Internet Use
  • 70% are online one hour per day
  • 70% have high speed access
  • 60% see Internet info more useful than print

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

technology 14 18 year olds

Female

Male

Device

72%

74%

Desktop computer

73%

46%

Video Game Console

29%

DVD Player

38%

30%

Cell Phone

37%

20%

33%

CD Burner

30%

40%

Pager

12%

21%

MP3 Player

27%

20%

Digital Camera

18%

15%

Digital Video Camera

17%

16%

Laptop

Technology(14–18 year olds)

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

Source: Cassandra Report, December 2000

what they do online

Activities Online

Total

100%

Sending e-mail

Surfing around/seeing what is out there

98%

Looking up musical groups and artists

95%

93%

Chatting with friends online

Doing homework or research

92%

Listening to music

90%

Using instant messaging

89%

Checking movie, TV or concert listings

84%

Reading the news or magazines online

81%

Playing online games

80%

77%

Meeting people who share interests

70%

Watching streaming videos

69%

Exchanging own creative work with friends (art, poetry, music, etc.)

61%

Buying stuff

38%

Participating in online auctions

What They Do Online

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

Source: TBWA/Chiat/Day Research, 2000 Sample: 500 youth 13-24, recruited online

grunwald study
Grunwald Study

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

grunwald study24
Grunwald Study

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

kids and blogs
Kids and Blogs

4.12 million blogs have been created on these services:Blog-City, BlogSpot, Diaryland, LiveJournal, Pitas, TypePad, Weblogger and Xanga.

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

Perseus Development Corp. 2003

drop out rate of 16 24 year olds by race ethnicity
Drop Out Rate of 16-24 Year Olds(By Race/Ethnicity)

40

30

20

Percent

Hispanic

Black

10

Total

White

0

1972

1976

1980

1984

1988

1992

1996

2000

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

Source: The Condition of Education 2002, National Center for Education Statistics

12th graders view school 1983 2000
12th Graders View School:(1983–2000)

60

51

47

50

40

41

39

36

40

35

31

29

28

30

24

Percent

21

1983

20

1990

1995

10

2000

0

School work is meaningful

Courses are interesting

School will be important in later life

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

Source: The Condition of Education 2002, National Center for Education Statistics

today s college grads have spent
Today’s college grads have spent:
  • 10,000 hours playing video games
  • 20,000 hours watching TV
  • 20,000 hours talking on the phone
  • countless hours listening to music, surfing the Web, and using Instant Messenger, chat rooms and email
  • 5,000 hours reading
  • 11,000 hours attending school.

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

“Information Anxiety” -- Richard Saul Wurman

new study june 2003
New Study--June 2003
  • NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- Teens and young adults ages 13 to 24 now spend more time every day on the Internet than they do watching TV, according to a new study conducted by Harris Interactive and Teenage Research Unlimited.

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

born to be wired understanding the first wired generation
"Born to Be Wired: Understanding the First Wired Generation,"

confirms other recent reports and widespread assumptions that there has been a profound shift in the way teens and young adults treat and engage withmedia.

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

information seekers
Information Seekers

13-to 24-year-olds spend weekly

  • 16.7 hours online (excluding e-mail);
  • 13.6 hours watching TV; 12 hours listening to the radio;
  • 7.7 hours talking on the phone (including landlines & cell phones);
  • 6 hours reading books and magazines to keep up on personal interests.

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

multi taskers
Multi-taskers
  • 68% listen to CDs or MP3s;
  • 50% watch TV;
  • 45% talk on the phone;
  • 45% listen to the radio;
  • 45% do homework;
  • 21% read.
  • Only 5% of those surveyed said they do nothing else while they\'re online.

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

reveling on fragmentation
Reveling on Fragmentation

Today\'s media fragmentation, a headache for marketers and a frustration for adults looking to simplify their media options, presents an energizing challenge rather than a problem for most teens and young adults. They thrive on the sheer variety of choices and enjoy managing, controlling and personalizing them.

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

millennial kids are different
Millennial Kids are Different

A great deal of brain research in the past five years tells us that kids today are FUNDAMENTALLY different in the way they think, in the way they access, absorb, interpret, process and use information and above all, in the way they view, interactand communicate in the modern world.

brain research
Brain Research
  • Neuroplasticity
  • The brain constantly reorganizes itself structurally throughout life based on input and its intensity.
  • FMRI
  • Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows that youth use significantly different neural pathways than our generation to process the same information

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

slide36

Digital Natives:

Process information and communicate in

fundamentally different ways than any previous

generation before them.

Learning in the New Digital Landscape--InfoSavvy Group, February, 2003

--

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

digital immigrants
Digital Immigrants:

Are those who struggle as they learn to speak about and deal with rapid change and powerful new technologies in the same way they would struggle to learn a new language.

They are DSL (digital as a second language)

Learning in the New Digital Landscape--InfoSavvy Group, February, 2003

--

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

digital aliens
Digital Aliens:

Actually deny that technological developments have radically changed our world and our children.

Instead of embracing the new, instead of recognizing that it’s a new digital world, many immigrants complain and remain attached to the old and talk about how much better it was in the old country.

Learning in the New Digital Landscape--InfoSavvy Group, February, 2003

--

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

millennials want to learn
Millennials Want to Learn
  • With technology
  • With one another
  • Online
  • In their time
  • In their place
  • Doing things that matter

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

voices and views major themes of national findings
Voices And Views:Major Themes of National Findings

Today’s students are very technology savvy, feel strongly about the positive value of technology and rely upon technology as an essential and preferred component of every aspect of theirlives.

© March 2004, NetDay

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

voices and views major themes of national findings41
Voices And Views:Major Themes of National Findings
  • Students are not just using technology differently today, but are approaching their life and their daily activities differently because of the technology.
  • As students get older, their use of technology becomes more sophisticated, but, comparatively, the younger students are on a faster track to becoming greater technology users and advocates.

© March 2004, NetDay

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

voices and views major themes of national findings42
Voices And Views:Major Themes of National Findings

Technology is allowing today’s students to be ultra-communicators. Students are using online communications tools to brainstorm school projects with classmates, to seek help on homework from a tutor, to update a cousin in another state on the family reunion and to make social plans with friends for Saturday night. All at the same time.

© March 2004, NetDay

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

voices and views major themes of national findings43
Voices And Views:Major Themes of National Findings

Students in all grades have highly developed ideas about how technology can be used more effectively within their education and want to share those ideas with the appropriate decision makers to impact real change. Students are looking for guidance on how to effectively make a difference in their schools and communities.

© March 2004, NetDay

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

basic skills

Answers the No Child Left Behind Act

Basic Skills
  • Children gain fundamental skills faster and better using technology-based curriculum
  • Students are more engaged in learning exercises for longer periods of time
  • Instruction adapts to individual student needs

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

technology proficiency

Increases productivity, engagement, motivation

Technology Proficiency
  • Children write more and write better
  • Students have ready access to a world of information
  • Digital media help students express their work creatively
  • Students take greater pride in their work

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

21st century literacy

Prepares students for a changing world

21st-Century Literacy
  • Read critically and communicate persuasively
  • Apply mathematical and scientific principles to solve real-world problems
  • Acquire, analyze, and synthesize information
  • Learn through inquiry and collaboration
  • Become lifelong learners

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

sense of self

Motivates students to achieve

Sense of Self
  • Attendance improves with routine technology usage
  • More children finish high school
  • More students go on to college
  • Students see more possibilities for the future

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

beyond potential
Beyond Potential
  • Set shared and measurable achievement goals
  • Align curricula, instruction, assessment, and resources
  • Provide routine and regular access to technology
  • Prepare teachers for effective technology use
  • Measure and report progress
  • Engage Parents

Brian Page, Ed.D Education Technology Specialist May 2004

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