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Access Center 3 rd Annual Information Sharing Community Meeting . Works in Progress: A Report on Middle and High School Improvement Programs Steve Fleischman , CSRQ Center Director. October 4, 2005. Presentation Overview. Presentation Overview. Why We Need Better Evidence

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Access Center3rd Annual Information Sharing Community Meeting

Works in Progress: A Report on Middle and High School Improvement Programs

Steve Fleischman, CSRQ Center Director

October 4, 2005


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Presentation Overview

Presentation Overview

  • Why We Need Better Evidence

  • How to Find and Judge Evidence

  • Evidence on Middle and High School Improvement Programs

  • Working together to improve Middle School programs and practice


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Need for Better Evidence

  • Claims, Claims, Claims

  • Need and demand for better evidence to guide school improvement

  • Importance of matching research methods to questions asked

  • Importance of implementation

  • Judging the quality of research (Who does it? Who do you trust?)


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Three BIG Questions:

  • What works?

  • How do you know?

  • So what?


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Sources of Evidence

Sources of Evidence for Decision Making in Education

  • Empirical Evidence

  • Professional Wisdom

    Why Are Both Needed?

  • Without professional wisdom education cannot

    • adapt to local circumstances

    • operate intelligently in the many areas in which research evidence is absent or incomplete.

  • Without empirical evidence education cannot

    • resolve competing approaches

    • generate cumulative knowledge

    • avoid fad, fancy, and personal bias

      Adapted from a presentation by Grover (Russ) Whitehurst, IES Director, US Department of Education (http://www.ed.gov/offices/OERI/presentations/evidencebase.html)


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How will we know if it’s a strong study ?

What to look for in research studies on program or practice effectiveness:

  • Detailed description of the study sample (Does the program serve kids like mine?)

  • Indication that the program is the likely source of change in students’ outcomes (RCTs are strongest source of evidence)

    • Pre and post test

    • Comparison group

  • Indication that the findings reported are based on appropriate methods of statistical analysis

  • Sufficient detail on the findings and implementation of the intervention to allow its replication


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    Resources for Judging Research

    • Slavin, R.E. (2003). A reader’s guide to scientifically based research. Educational Leadership, 60, 12-16.http://www.ascd.org/publications/ed_lead/200302/slavin.html

    • Fashola, O.S. (2004). Being an informed consumer of quantitative educational research. Phi Delta Kappan, 85, 532-538.

    • Stringfield, S. (1998). Choosing Success. American Educator. http://www.aft.org/pubs-reports/american_educator/fall98/ChoosingSuccess.pdf

    • Lauer, P. A. (2004). A policymaker’s primer on education research: How to understand, evaluate and use it.http://www.ecs.org/html/educationIssues/Research/primer/foreword.asp

    • Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education (2003). Identifying and implementing educational practices supported by rigorous evidence: A user friendly guide.(Prepared by the Coalition for Evidence Based Policy, )http://www.ed.gov/rschstat/research/pubs/rigorousevid/rigorousevid.pdf


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    What do we know about effective programs?

    • Comprehensive School Reform

      • Educators’ Guide to Schoolwide Reform (AIR) http://www.aasa.org/Reform/

      • CSR Meta-Analysis (Borman et al) http://www.csos.jhu.edu/CRESPAR/techReports/Report59.pdf

      • Catalog of School Reform Models (NWREL)http://www.nwrel.org/scpd/catalog/index.shtml

    • Reading

      • Florida Center for Reading Research http://www.fcrr.org/FCRRReports/reportslist.htm

    • Math (and, soon, other topics)

      • What Works Clearinghousehttp://www.whatworks.ed.gov

    • Substance Abuse

      • SAMHSA, U.S Department of Health and Human Serviceshttp://modelprograms.samhsa.gov/

    • Safe & Supportive Schools

      • U Colorado, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violencehttp://www.colorado.edu/cspv/blueprints/


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    Center for Effective Collaboration and Practicehttp://cecp.air.org

    Center for Implementing Technology in Educationhttp://www.citeducation.org

    Comprehensive School Reform Quality (CSRQ) Centerhttp://www.csrq.org

    K8 Access Centerhttp://www.k8accesscenter.org/

    National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violencehttp://www.promoteprevent.org

    National Center for Technology Innovationhttp://www.nationaltechcenter.org

    National Center on Education, Disability and Juvenile Justicehttp://www.edjj.org

    National Center on Student Progress Monitoringhttp://www.studentprogress.org

    National Coordinator Training and Technical Assistance Centerhttp://www.k12coordinator.org

    National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At Riskhttp://www.neglected-delinquent.org

    National Reporting System for Adult Education (NRS)http://www.nrsweb.org

    Supplemental Educational Services Quality (SESQ) Centerhttp://tutorsforkids.org

    Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Familyhttp://www.air.org/tapartnership

    What Works Clearinghousehttp://www.whatworks.ed.gov

    AIR Resources for Evidence–Based School Improvement


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    More AIR Resources

    • Safe, Supportive and Successful Schools: Step by Step (Osher, et al) (www.sopriswest.org)

    • ASCD Educational Leadership column on Research Matters (www.ascd.org)

    • CSRQ Center (www.csrq.org)

    • AIR’s School District Consulting Services (www.air.org)


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    CSRQ Center: What we do

    CSRQ Center

    • Produce consumer-friendly CSRQ Center Reports.

    • Develop partnerships to promote knowledge and use of CSRQ Center reports and tools.

    • Provide technical assistance in partnership with selected states, districts, and schools.


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    CSRQ Center Reports

    • Works in Progress: A Report on Middle and High School Improvement Programs (January 2005)

    • CSRQ Center Reports on Elementary School CSR Programs (Fall 2005)

    • CSRQ Center Reports on Education Service Providers (Fall 2005)

    • CSRQ Center Reports on Middle and High School CSR Programs (Fall 2006)

    • CSRQ Center Reports on Elementary School CSR Programs (revised and expanded, Fall 2006)


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    CSRQ Center Reports: Framework

    CSRQ Center

    CSRQ Center Reports are produced using Quality Review Tools (QRT). Reports features:

    • Basic Program Information

    • Dimensions of Quality. Strength of evidence of:

      • Positive Effects on Student Achievement

      • Positive Effects on Additional Outcomes

      • Family and Community Involvement

      • Strong Link between Research and Program Design

      • Program Provider’s Support for Implementation

      • Program Provider’s Financial Viability

      • Evidence of Program Provider’s Capacity to Deliver High-Quality Services to All Schools


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    Works in Progress Report

    Contents, Suggested Uses and Limitations:

    • Report Overview (see handout)

    • The Structure of Works in Progress

      • Key challenges

      • Responses to key challenges including research findings

      • Considerations

      • Resources and references

    • CSR Section


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    Works in Progress Report (2)

    Guidance on Middle School Key Issues:

    • Transition to Middle School

    • Literacy and Reading

    • English Language Learners

    • Violence and Bullying

    • Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs

    • Parental Involvement

    • Transition from Middle to High School

    • CSR Models and Key Issues


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    Works in Progress Report (3)

    Guidance on High School Key Issues:

    • Transition to High School

    • Literacy and Reading

    • English Language Learners

    • High School Dropouts

    • Violence

    • Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs

    • Transition from High School to Postsecondary Settings


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    Works in Progress Report (4)

    Guidance on High School Key Issues:

    • Transition to High School

    • Literacy and Reading

    • English Language Learners

    • High School Dropouts

    • Violence

    • Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs

    • Transition from High School to Postsecondary Settings


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    Application of WIP

    Works in Progress Report

    Each group is a school improvement team comprised of teachers and administrators. You are seeking to address the two primary issues in middle or high school you have identified. Discuss the following questions:

    • How might these resources be useful to you?

    • How could you use these resources to move to move to next steps on school improvement?


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    WIP: Limitations

    Works in Progress Report

    • Survey of Issues-Not Exhaustive (starting point, not ending one)

    • Need for Better Evidence

    • Suggestive Evidence; Not Definitive (not a what works” report, but a “desk reference”)

    • Need for Changes in Multiple Areas (need comprehensive approaches)

    • Effective Implementation is Key

    • Need for Alignment with Local Efforts


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    Working Together to Promote Evidence- Based Improvement

    • Take the lead on insisting that policies, programs, and approaches are evidence-based. (“Show me the evidence.”)

    • Once made, stick to policies that are based on sound evidence and give them time to work. (“No quick fixes.”)

    • Work in partnership with the CSRQ Center (“Better Evidence. Better Choices. Better Schools.”)


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    CSRQ Center: Contact Us

    American Institutes for Research

    1000 Thomas Jefferson St, NW

    Washington, DC 20007-3835

    www.csrq.org

    Steve Fleischman, Director

    [email protected] 202/403-5989


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