service jam post jam data analysis january 7 th 2011
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The 40 to 60 year old age group was the most active group in the Service Jam - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Service Jam - Post Jam Data Analysis January 7 th 2011. Table of Contents. The Service Jam Story Background & Objectives Service Jam Participation & Demographics General Observations Quick Poll Summary COBRA Analysis Summary Facilitator Debrief Summary Appendix. The Service Jam Story.

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Presentation Transcript
slide2

Table of Contents

  • The Service Jam Story
  • Background & Objectives
  • Service Jam Participation & Demographics
  • General Observations
  • Quick Poll Summary
  • COBRA Analysis Summary
  • Facilitator Debrief Summary
  • Appendix
slide3

The Service Jam Story

  • Online collaboration, round-the-clock event from October 10-12, 2010 that brought together a global audience representing non-profit organizations, corporations, academic institutions, government agencies and others across ideology and geography.
  • The event was sponsored by IBM, in collaboration with over 600 organizations from across the globe
  • More than 15,000 people from 119 countries registered to discuss challenges in service and to share and develop ideas for making the world better through service.
  • Collaboration occurred to polish ideas, craft strategies and define practices that elevate the effectiveness and impact of volunteering, public service, social entrepreneurship and other forms of service.
  • Service Jam partners, Forum Hosts and Special Guests played a key role in both attracting and engaging participants in rich dialogue.
  • The Service Jam participation mix included approximately 60 percent IBM employees and 40 percent from nonprofit, academic, government and other corporations. Of the 5,860 posts throughout the three days, approximately 60 percent were contributed by non-IBM participants.
  • Participants engaged in virtual text conversations in eight discussion forums.
  • In collaboration with key partners, IBM has published a white paper summarizing key findings from Service Jam. You can find the Service Jam White Paper at: www.ibm.com/servicejam

Included in this file is the text mining and data analysis of the content, the intellectual analysis , interpretation, and conclusions are represented in the White Paper

3

slide4

Service Jam Objectives

Service Jam Objectives

  • Bring together non-profit organizations, corporations, academic institutions, government agencies and individuals to engage in an important dialogue around “Service as a Solution”
  • Collaborate virtually to generate breakthrough ideas that will redefine service and social innovation for the future
  • Produce a white paper summarizing key findings to share with participants revealing key trends in social innovation which will serve as a pragmatic guide to help organizations innovate, design and improve service programs
  • Moving Forward:
  • Jam site will remain open for registered users in ‘read only’ until January 31st 2011
  • Jammers are encouraged to return to site to rate ideas in the Hot Ideas tab
  • Post-Jam analysis and whitepaper is now published at www.ibm.com/servicejam
summary of service jam participation
Summary of Service Jam participation

Service Jam Participation

  • Participation:
    • Number of logins = 14,331
    • Countries represented = 105
    • Industries represented = 31
    • Average jam time/participant = 3.1 hrs

Participation Mix

approx. 60% of posts

External

IBM

40%

60%

By Age

By Years of Service

20%

14%

13%

13%

13%

12%

8%

3%

3%

3%

Years

Years

Note: Breakdown of participants is an analysis of the unique log-ins,

slide6
Service Jam had a global representation with major participation from North America, Europe, and Asia-Pacific

Participation by Geo

Service Jam Participation

Participation - Top 15 Countries

Note: Breakdown of participants is an analysis of the unique log-ins,

slide7
Of the 5,860 posts, discussion forums Empowering Individuals and Quantum Leaps accounted for 46% of Jam posts

Service Jam Participation

Most Active Jam-wide Discussion Threads Include:

% Posts by Forum

  • Let’s begin: what motivates you to serve
  • Salute to Service Jam organizers and participants
  • Long-term thinking
  • Engaging Young People Globally
  • Why is Effective Collaboration Often Difficult?
  • Service as a tool to improve educational outcomes
  • Which services need what technology
  • Quantum Leap in Infrastructure
  • Without investment we take volunteers for granted
  • Role of government
slide8

General Observations

Jam Program Office Observations

  • The significant Subject Matter Experts who served as Hosts and VIP Guests had a dramatic impact on the discussions; the invited population engaged almost exclusively with these leaders and SMEs of the Jam.
  • Discussions largely focused on thoughts and ideas proposed by Hosts and Special Guests vs. the general invited population. [See COBRA* report: All Hosts’ posts]
  • 50% of the content was contributed by non-IBM groups; those with 1-5 years and those with 20+ years contributed the most content. [See COBRA* cross-tabulation report: all themes by years of service]

*NOTE: COBRA - COrporate Brand and Recognition Analysis is a tool that uses advanced text and data analytics to collect, filter, and interpret massive online content. It is designed to interpret metrics such as buzz and sentiment.

Source: Service Jam; ManyEyes Alphaworks Word Cloud

the 40 to 60 year old age group was the most active group in the service jam

General Observations

The 40 to 60 year old age group was the most active group in the Service Jam
  • Youth education/development was a popular topic throughout the Jam, but the youngest population (16-25 years) represented the smallest age group of total participants (11%). 40-60 year olds, on the contrary, represented the largest age group (34%)
  • The mix of service experience from participants were quite polarizing, with the majority of participants having either 1-5 years of service experience, or 20+ years
  • Discussion about “Volunteer Management” were prominent among the 40-60 age group whereas the younger jammers discussed more about their motivations to serve and how the youth can be engaged to volunteer
  • Those who had under 1 year of service experience focused mainly on service and career opportunities for students and young people whereas those with 1+ of experience concentrated on general volunteer strategy, management and costs ["student" was number 1 word for under 1, "volunteer opportunities/projects" was number 1 for 1+]
  • The familiarity with the operations of service organizations increased as years of service increased, with many of those with over 6 years of service experience questioning how to improve it
  • The breakdown of participants was 40% external, 60% IBM whereas the breakdown of the posts was reverse, with 60% external, 40% internal
slide10

General Observations

A deeper look into the content showed a strong desire to address challenges in the sector and understand the impact of service
  • The majority of posts were less about best practices or new solutions, but rather on challenges in the service field or opinions on current service efforts
  • Although the theme "standardizing and defining measurements" was only prevalent in the Cobra report under "Measuring Social Impact," it was briefly mentioned in all other forums as a step to a larger solution
  • While many participants commented on the need to focus on \'impact\' throughout the Jam, the corresponding discussion forums (\'Measuring Impact\', \'Scaling Impact\') received the least posts
  • There seems to be a disconnect between the growing innovative fields in service and the mainstream public-- ie, many participants jammed about the difficulties of finding volunteering opportunities online, and the need for social entrepreneurship competitions/networks, even though there are major organizations that already exist for those purposes.
  • The question of "what motivates you to serve" not only drove the most responses, but was also a common driver in determining how to retain and engage volunteers
overview of quick polls
Overview of Quick Polls

During the Service Jam between October 10-12, Quick Polls, a series of short poll questions, were published periodically on the Jam homepage for participants to answer as they appeared. The goal of quick polls was to gain some insight on participant opinions around Service Jam-related topics. While quick polls are not a validated research methodology, they are a quick and highly informal way to collect information.

Each poll was posted on the Jam homepage for a few minutes or hours, and collected between 40 and 221 responses. It is not possible to estimate response rate, and no claim be made that the results are representative of Service Jam participants and the margins of error due to sampling can be as high as 15 percent*.

Quick Poll Results

“Why is it important to focus on students?… the students of today will become the leaders in business, academia and non-profit in the future. If they find personal value in community service now, that will hopefully translate over to their future profession and lives.”

- College Student, USAGlobal Challenges, Local Action

Should all students be required to conduct service?

Example

  • “… when young people and students are supported in making positive contributions, it creates a long-term habit of service and engagement. This correlation is noticeably stronger when service activity is infused across a formal educational program. “
  • General Exec./ Manager of a service learning NGO, USAQuantum Leaps in Service

Note: Margin of error assumes no poll had fewer than 40 respondents Participants have the option to answer quick polls as they appear throughout the Jam

slide12

Quick Poll Results

Respondents had strong feelings about how to integrate service in schools, engage youth in service and to motivate individuals

  • Respondents felt teaching service in schools can influence a more sustainable service culture
    • For long-term service thinking 50% of respondents thought we should teach service in schools and colleges
    • 74% of all respondents felt that service should be required on the part of students
    • The majority of respondents felt that the best way to increase community service volunteers is to integrate service into schools
  • Different opinions existed on how youth can be engaged in service
    • 54% of responses stated that the best way to engage youth is service is through schools
    • However, 76% of respondents felt that the family was the responsible party to teach youth to serve
  • Many felt that opportunities to share and passion for the subject were key motivations for volunteering
    • The chance to share is what was felt to best motivate volunteers
    • Respondents felt that passion was the most important attribute for a volunteer
  • Among respondents, social impact is seen as the strongest motivation to serve and best measurement of success
    • 60% stated that the volunteering they do must have social impact
    • Visibility of impact and results was thought to be the best motivation for non profit employees
    • A majority felt that service effort success was best measured by magnitude of impact

Integrating service and Motivating volunteers

slide13

Quick Poll Results

Individuals felt that technology innovation has influenced service but there are still fundamental issues that service organizations face

  • Respondents felt advances in technology have influenced and will continue to open new possibilities in furthering service
    • 43% stated that Social Networking technology has affected service the most
    • 83% felt that social Networking sites have actually helped their efforts
    • Respondents had a wide array of ways to identify opportunities but 20% stated they use the internet as their method
  • Funding, leadership and measuring social impact are among some fundamental challenges participants felt service organizations face
    • The majority, 44%, felt that funding was the largest problem service organizations faced
    • Lack of knowing how to measure impact was seen as the greatest weakness in determining how to measure service
  • Respondents also expressed that partnerships across sectors is integral in scaling social innovation, but challenges still exist
    • Misaligned goals is seen as the greatest difficulty with cross sector partnering efforts
    • However, 45% stated that developing alliances and partnerships were key to scaling social innovation

Fundamental challenges can inhibit innovation

slide14

COBRA Analysis Summary

From the COBRA analysis, we found a number of major themes across forums

Major themes from COBRA*

*Major themes also contain sub-themes specific to forums

slide15

Facilitator Debrief Summary

Facilitators identified several themes in each forum, including “Volunteer Management” and “Technology, Social Media and Science of Service”

slide18

COBRA Analysis Summary

Based on the COBRA analysis, there were a number of major themes across forums

Major themes from COBRA*

% corresponds to forum posts

*Major themes also contain sub-themes specific to forums

slide19

COBRA Analysis Summary

Based on the COBRA analysis, there were a number of major themes across geo’s

Major themes by Geo*

% corresponds to posts per Geo

*Major themes also contain sub-themes specific to forums

slide20

COBRA Analysis Summary

Volunteer investment and service culture were consistently important across all participants regardless years of experience

Major Themes by Years of Service

% corresponds to posts per Age Group

slide21

Facilitator Debrief Summary

During the workshop facilitators identified several innovative ideas to engage more volunteers, make service mainstream and foster a service culture

Top Ideas from Post Jam Facilitator Working Sessions

slide22

Facilitator Debrief Summary

Top Ideas from Post Jam Facilitator Working Sessions (Continued)

respondents feel teaching service in schools can influence a more sustainable service culture
Respondents feel teaching service in schools can influence a more sustainable service culture

Quick Poll Results

For long-term service thinking, we should:

Should all students be required to conduct service?

2

1

“Why is it important to focus on students?… the students of today will become the leaders in business, academia and non-profit in the future. If they find personal value in community service now, that will hopefully translate over to their future profession and lives.”

- College Student, USAGlobal Challenges, Local Action

Best way to increase community service volunteers:

3

  • “… when young people and students are supported in making positive contributions, it creates a long-term habit of service and engagement. This correlation is noticeably stronger when service activity is infused across a formal educational program. “
  • General Exec./ Manager of a service learning NGO, USAQuantum Leaps in Service

Note: Quick polls appeared on Service Jam homepage and were recycled throughout the event; # of respondents varied by polls

different opinions exist on how youth can be engaged in service
Different opinions exist on how youth can be engaged in service

Quick Poll Results

The best way to engage youth in service is through:

4

“In the end, service begins at home -- not in institutions.. A law won\'t [prohibit] unkindness or cyber bullying, no more than an institution can mandate the compassion, caring and ethic of service that a child\'s learns best from his/her earliest role models.”

- General Exec./ Manager of a community development NGO,USAQuantum Leaps

  • “As a student, I believe through the channel of university level club activities, students can start to experience the notion of service, and broaden their service experience to larger extent.
  • University student, TaiwanGlobal Challenges, Local Action

Teaching youth to serve is the responsibility of:

5

Take out Gloria’s name

  • ”Educators need to have stories, examples, and curricula that they can use to teach youth about their role in promoting long-term solutions to local and global issues.”
  • General Exec. / Manager of advocacy NGO, USAQuantum Leaps in Service

Note: Quick polls appeared on Service Jam homepage and were recycled throughout the event; # of respondents varied by polls

slide25
Among respondents, social impact is the strongest motivation to serve and best measurement of success

Quick Poll Results

Any volunteering I conduct needs to:

Service effort success is best measured by:

7

6

Best motivation for non-profit employees to continue their careers:

“People need to see the value of what they do… Volunteers want some feedback that what they do is valuable. ”

- Advocate of nonprofit, USAEmpowering Individuals

8

On Management, not Measurement: “We have found that if the people, structure, systems and services are all in alignment with the mission, it ensures a higher level of social performance on an ongoing basis… measurement on an ongoing basis is an ongoing distraction..”

-Consultant at Professional Services, UK

Measuring Impact

Note: Quick polls appeared on Service Jam homepage and were recycled throughout the event; # of respondents varied by polls

many felt that opportunities to share and passion for subject are key motivations for volunteering
Many felt that opportunities to share and passion for subject are key motivations for volunteering

Quick Poll Results

What best motivates volunteers?

I volunteer…

9

10

What do you find most valuable in a volunteer?

11

  • “It\'s one of the many reasons I am optimistic about our world and our future -- people just like you who want to roll up your sleeves and help others. The question I have now is: is there anyone else out there?
  • President George H.W. Bush, USA,
  • Empowering Individuals

Note: Quick polls appeared on Service Jam homepage and were recycled throughout the event; # of respondents varied by polls

slide27

Quick Poll Results

Respondents feel advances in technology have influenced and will continue to open new possibilities in furthering service

Which technology has most affected service?

In serving society, social networking has:

12

13

  • On a Social Service Cloud: “I think the development of a common technology would go a long way in helping these organizations speak the same language and manage/leverage their resources, while providing great benefits for their customers...”
  • Project Manager at a workforce development NGO, USADigital Revolution in Service

I find volunteer opportunities through:

14

“By reporting regularly via social media, an organisation and it´s actions are becoming more transparent and people are more likely to build up trust towards it, which is an important basis for getting involved...”

- Researcher at a corporate citizenship NGO, GermanyDigital Revolution in Service

Note: Quick polls appeared on Service Jam homepage and were recycled throughout the event; # of respondents varied by polls

slide28
Funding, leadership and measuring social impact are among some challenges participants feel service organizations face

Quick Poll Results

The biggest challenge service organizations face is:

15

“For over thirty years, Habitat for Humanity has housed more than 2 million people in 90 countries around the world but we have anecdotal rather than longitudinal statistical data…I imagine other nonprofits struggle to to provide hard data on the ROI of donor investments. It seems business partners with systems and technical expertise could help…thus enable a real leap.”

- Legal employee of a housing NGO, USAMeasuring Impact

What\'s the biggest challenge to measuring service?

16

“One issue that keeps some organizations far from long term thinking is the fact that many of them are using all the resources they have to survive for the next day, or period.”

- Project Manager of a NGO, Brazil, Quantum Leaps

Note: Quick polls appeared on Service Jam homepage and were recycled throughout the event; # of respondents varied by polls

slide29

Quick Poll Results

Respondents feel partnerships across sectors is integral in scaling social innovation, but challenges still exist

  • Is there a way the nonprofit and volunteer sector can better capitalize on the private sector\'s increasing interest in helping out in ways that more meaningfully benefits causes and speaks to nonprofits\' vital needs?”  
  • Board member/advisor of advocacy NGO, USAIncreasing Value & Impact of Service

Partnering across sectors is difficult because of:

17

  • “Many well-intentioned collaboratives fall into endless meetings rehashing the problem rather than deploying the solution because the commitment to action and a specific plan were not agreed to up front!“
  • Communications role at IBM, USAProgress through Collaboration

Most important when scaling social innovation:

18

  • “Often the best way to spread a social innovation isn’t to scale an organization…Instead we need to differentiate the approaches along the full continuum from scaling to diffusion… spreading the idea not the individual or the organization”
  • Chief executive ofsocial innovation thinktank, UKScaling Impact

”Is there an opportunity to capture a set of best practices and compile a "scalability toolkit" that would aid smaller NGOs in particular?”

- Marketing role at IBM, IndiaScaling Impact

Note: Quick polls appeared on Service Jam homepage and were recycled throughout the event; # of respondents varied by polls

slide30

Additional Polls

What\'s the best sign of progress in a community?

Should everyone be required to conduct service?

What areas benefit most from grassroots action?

In terms of impact, the service movement is:

slide31

Additional Polls

The idea of NGOs using business models is:

Should companies profit from serving society?

Many organizations partner for the wrong reasons.

Service to others is a human instinct.

slide32

Additional Polls

Local solutions are always best.

Which generation does the most societal good?

Business should help solve societal issues.

Governments should promote service.

slide33

Additional Polls

Who should lead in solving societal issues?

Who is best at solving global problems?

Service partnerships work best when there is:

My last cross-sector collaboration effort was a:

slide34

Additional Polls

Newspapers should have a section on service.

If all colleges taught nonprofit management:

When partnering, competition among partners is:

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