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CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. Jo Hartmann 394-1876-ext 140 [email protected] Wherever groups of people live and work together, there are issues of organization that have to be solved or there is chaos. . John Locke, the English philosopher, theorized about how society evolved. .

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Classroom management

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

Jo Hartmann

394-1876-ext 140

[email protected]











  • Rules and procedures structure, there are three basic and necessary components:

  • Consequences

  • Relationships





  • The two main things we have to remember about rules are we forget that the other two components, rules and procedures and their logical consequences are also vital.

  • FIRST: that they have to

    protect student and teacher safety and

    SECOND: they have to facilitate the best conditions for learning.











  • Desk arrangements can minimize problems. usually unwritten, but have been practiced enough so students know them. It provides security to students to know what’s expected of them.

  • Assign the students to their desks initially.

  • As trust and cooperation develop students may request changes.

  • Good behavior agreement from students requesting other seats is needed.


Teacher i m finished now what do i do
Teacher, I’m Finished. Now What Do I Do? usually unwritten, but have been practiced enough so students know them. It provides security to students to know what’s expected of them.

  • The best-laid management plan can go astray during transition times when students who have completed class assignments butt in, asking for directions or begin playing around, disrupting others.


Quiet choices
Quiet Choices usually unwritten, but have been practiced enough so students know them. It provides security to students to know what’s expected of them.

  • Post a list of activities.

  • Students can select a card from three suggested choices.

  • Magazine rack selection, book shelf choice, art bucket, puzzle place, quick draw station, computer site to visit, cut pictures and letters for the bulletin board, free time writing activity.


Summary of current u s research
Summary of Current U.S. Research usually unwritten, but have been practiced enough so students know them. It provides security to students to know what’s expected of them.

  • Marzano: Classroom Management That Works

  • Orange: 25 Biggest Mistakes Teachers Make

  • Tileston: What Every Teacher Should Know About Classroom Management and Discipline

  • Reyhner: Teaching American Indian Students

  • Checkley,: A Visit to Classrooms of Effective Teachers, ASCD

  • ASCD: Creating Caring Schools

  • PDK: The Shame of the Nation


To consider: usually unwritten, but have been practiced enough so students know them. It provides security to students to know what’s expected of them.

• how relationships are developed and maintained

• the importance of establishing positive relationships with all children

• how to promote positive relationships between children


Underlying principles
Underlying principles usually unwritten, but have been practiced enough so students know them. It provides security to students to know what’s expected of them.

• Positive relationships with children are key to positive behavior and regular attendance

• Positive relationships may just happen, but they can also be developed

• Positive recognition and reinforcement develop positive behavior and build the relationship

• Behavior is contextual and interactive: the way adults manage their own emotional responses has an important influence on children’s behavior


The fifth r
The Fifth R usually unwritten, but have been practiced enough so students know them. It provides security to students to know what’s expected of them.

Relationships

The 4Rs

Rights

Responsibilities

Choices

Rules

Positive consequences

Negative consequences

Inevitability

Routines


Potential barriers to establishing positive relationships
Potential barriers to establishing positive relationships usually unwritten, but have been practiced enough so students know them. It provides security to students to know what’s expected of them.

• Large number of children with whom teacher needs to develop relationships

• Lack of time to spend with individuals

• We ourselves find it easier to develop positive relationships with some individuals than others

• Some children are actively suspicious of, and unfamiliar with, positive relationships


Exception finding
Exception finding usually unwritten, but have been practiced enough so students know them. It provides security to students to know what’s expected of them.

• Changing the view of the problem

  • Identifying successful moments

  • Identifying times when the behavior is less severe, less frequent, less long-lasting.

    ‘If you keep on doing what you’re doing, you’ll keep on getting what you’re getting’


Never treat a child in a way you wouldn’t treat an adult.

  • Try to see things through the child’s eyes.



We have considered
We have considered: be emphasized enough. Kindness and humor shown in a business-like, task-oriented atmosphere is pivotal. When students feel cared about, they want to cooperate, not misbehave.

• the importance of establishing positive relationships with all pupils

• how relationships are developed and maintained

• looking for exceptions in a ‘difficult’ relationship

• the ‘relationship bank’

• how to promote positive relationships between children in a classroom community


Factors influencing how we view the world
Factors Influencing How We View the World be emphasized enough. Kindness and humor shown in a business-like, task-oriented atmosphere is pivotal. When students feel cared about, they want to cooperate, not misbehave.

  • Family

  • Gender

  • Race

  • Age

  • Sexual Orientation

  • Language

  • Friends


  • Religion be emphasized enough. Kindness and humor shown in a business-like, task-oriented atmosphere is pivotal. When students feel cared about, they want to cooperate, not misbehave.

  • School background

  • Geography

  • Income of family/social class

  • Political views

  • Ethnicity

  • Tech savvy


  • Social organizations be emphasized enough. Kindness and humor shown in a business-like, task-oriented atmosphere is pivotal. When students feel cared about, they want to cooperate, not misbehave.

  • Travel experience

  • Special needs, (physical)

  • Special needs, (behavioral)

  • Special needs, (academic)

  • ELL

  • ESL


  • Marzano’s research states: be emphasized enough. Kindness and humor shown in a business-like, task-oriented atmosphere is pivotal. When students feel cared about, they want to cooperate, not misbehave.

  • If a teacher has a good relationship with students, then students more readily accept the rules and procedures and the disciplinary actions that follow their violations.




Teacher characteristics
Teacher characteristics actions that follow violations are also necessary components of effective classroom management.

  • An analysis of teacher characteristics associated with effective instruction and classroom management includes:

  • Moderately high dominance

  • Moderately high cooperation

  • Consideration

  • Buoyancy

  • Inner control


Action steps
Action steps actions that follow violations are also necessary components of effective classroom management.

  • Assertive body language

  • Appropriate tone of voice

  • Persisting until the appropriate behavior occurs

  • Establishing clear learning goals

  • Providing flexible learning goals


Taking a personal interest
Taking a Personal Interest actions that follow violations are also necessary components of effective classroom management.

  • Talking informally with students before, during and after class about their interests

  • Greeting students outside of school

  • Singling out a few students each day in the lunchroom and talking to them

  • Being aware of and commenting on important events in students’ lives



  • Making eye contact by scanning the entire room as you speak of school

  • Freely moving about all sections of the room

  • Deliberately moving toward and being close to each student in the room

  • Attributing ownership of ideas to the student who originated them “Dennis has just added to Mary’s idea by saying that…”


  • Allowing and encouraging ALL students to be part of classroom discussions

  • Providing appropriate “wait time.”

  • Emphasizing right parts of wrong answers

  • Encouraging collaboration

  • Restating or rephrasing the question

  • Giving hints or clues

  • Providing the answer and asking for elaboration


Types of student behavior
Types of Student Behavior classroom discussions

  • Passive: 1. fear of relationships 2. fear of failure

  • Aggressive: 1. hostile 2. oppositional 3. covert

  • Attention problems: 1. hyperactive 2. inattentive

  • Perfectionist

  • Socially inept


Conclusion
Conclusion classroom discussions

  • Teacher-student relationships are critical to the success of the two other aspects of classroom management – rules and procedures and disciplinary interventions

  • To build good relationships, communicate appropriate levels of dominance and let students know you are in control of the class and are willing and able to lead






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