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Asexual propagation = production of new plants without use of seeds PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Asexual propagation. Asexual propagation = production of new plants without use of seeds. Why use asexual propagation?. Easier or cheaper to propagate than seed (e.g. potato). Able to produce uniform plants (clones). Some plants do not produce seeds (e.g. navel oranges).

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Asexual propagation = production of new plants without use of seeds

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Asexual propagation

  • Asexual propagation = production of new plants without use of seeds

  • Why use asexual propagation?

  • Easier or cheaper to propagate than seed (e.g. potato)

  • Able to produce uniform plants (clones)

  • Some plants do not produce seeds (e.g. navel oranges)

  • Shorter time in juvenile stage (e.g. fruit trees)

  • Able to incorporate new characteristics into plant (e.g. European grapes, dwarf fruit trees)

  • Create ‘self-pollinating’ varieties to save space (e.g. 3-in-1 fruit trees)


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Today

Wednesday

Asexual propagation

  • Division

  • Major types of asexual propagation:

  • Cuttings

  • Layering

  • Grafting

  • Budding

  • Micropropagation (tissue culture)


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  • Orchids (separate pseudobulbs)

Asexual propagation

  • Division = Separating plants by tearing apart roots, rhizomes or stolons

  • Common technique for multi-stem plants such as:

  • Ferns (rhizomes)

  • Iris (rhizomes)

  • Houseplants with rhizomes or roots (e.g. Sansevaria, African Violets, Aloe)

  • Spider plants (remove plantlets at ends of stolons)


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Asexual propagation

  • Cuttings = production of new plants from pieces of stem, leaves, roots or buds

  • Common method of propagation

  • Types of cuttings:

  • Leaf cuttings

  • Leaf-bud cuttings

  • Stem cuttings

  • Root cuttings


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Asexual propagation

  • Advantages: many leaves/plant; few stock plants needed

  • Leaf Cuttings :

  • Disadvantage: most plants cannot produce adventitious shoots from leaves

  • Types of leaf cuttings:

  • Leaf-petiolecutting: entire leaf propagated

  • Plantlet forms at base of petiole

  • Use for African Violets, Begonia, Peperomia


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Asexual propagation

  • Types of leaf cuttings:

  • Leaf Cuttings :

  • Leaf-bladecutting: just leaf blade propagated

  • Plantlet forms at base of leaf

  • Use for jade and some succulent plants

  • Leaf-veincutting: perpendicular slits cut in veins of leaf

  • Plantlets form at each slit

  • Use for some Rex Begonia species


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Asexual propagation

  • Types of leaf cuttings:

  • Leaf Cuttings :

  • Leaf-sectioncutting: portion of leaf blade propagated

  • Plantlet forms at base of cutting

  • Use for Sansevaria (variegation will not reproduce) or Rex Begonia


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Asexual propagation

  • Leaf-budCuttings: stem section with 1-2 lateral (axillary) buds propagated

  • Used to obtain many cuttings from plants whose leaves do not form adventitious stems

  • Axillary bud becomes plantlet

  • Use for houseplants such as Philodendron, Pothos, rubber tree and for some large-leaved shrubs (e.g. Rhododendron)


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Asexual propagation

  • for plants whose leaves do not form adventitious stems

  • StemCuttings: portion of stems propagated

  • Types of stem cuttings:

  • Herbaceouscutting: stems from nonwoody plants (most houseplants such as Coleus, Poinsettia, corn plants)

  • Softwoodcutting: new, soft stems taken from woody plants in Spring (e.g. Lilac, maple, dogwood)

  • Semi-hardwoodcutting: partially mature wood on current-season stem in Summer (e.g. Rhododendron, Citrus trees)

  • hardwoodcutting: mature stems

  • Taken from deciduous plants in late Fall to early Spring when dormant

  • Taken from evergreen plants in late Fall to late Winter when dormant


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Asexual propagation

  • Used to obtain cuttings from plants whose leaves do not form adventitious stems

  • RootCuttings: root section propagated

  • Roots store food reserves at end of growing season; root cutting most effective late Winter to early Spring

  • Use for houseplants with rhizomes and many woody shrubs (e.g. Rubus)

  • Most cuttings more successful if:

  • high humidity, sanitary techniques,

  • use rooting hormones (IBA or NAA),

  • inserted properly, correct rooting medium, addition of bottom heat and taken at correct time of year


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Asexual propagation

  • Layering = formation of adventitious roots without cutting the plant

  • Two common types:

  • Airlayering: wound stem, surround stem with moist sphagnum moss and wrap with polyethylene

  • Used for houseplants (e.g. rubber trees, corn plants) and woody plants (e.g. Cornus, Rhododendron)

  • Tiplayering: stems of ‘mother’ plant buried in soil to promote growth of adventitious roots

  • Used for houseplants (e.g. Pothos) and many woody shrubs (e.g. Rhododendron, Forsythia, Rubus)


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