Diversity in the Academic/Research Setting A Comprehensive Cancer Center Perspective - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Diversity in the academic research setting a comprehensive cancer center perspective l.jpg
Download
1 / 74

Diversity in the Academic/Research Setting A Comprehensive Cancer Center Perspective . Carol L. Brown MD, FACS Director, Office of Diversity Programs in Clinical Care, Research, and Training Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Academia & Industry Symposium Diversity & Inclusion

Related searches for Diversity in the Academic/Research Setting A Comprehensive Cancer Center Perspective

I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.

Download Presentation

Diversity in the Academic/Research Setting A Comprehensive Cancer Center Perspective

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Diversity in the academic research setting a comprehensive cancer center perspective l.jpg

Diversity in the Academic/Research Setting A Comprehensive Cancer Center Perspective

Carol L. Brown MD, FACS

Director, Office of Diversity Programs in

Clinical Care, Research, and Training

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Academia & Industry Symposium

Diversity & Inclusion

October 6, 2006


Slide2 l.jpg

Diversity in the Academic/Research Setting

Objectives

  • What groups do you work with in clinical research?

  • How do you involve diversity in your research?

  • In health care, what is the diversity challenge?

  • What population do you work with and what are the specific diversity issues with this population?


Slide3 l.jpg

Memorial Hospital


Mortimer b zuckerman research center l.jpg

Mortimer B. Zuckerman Research Center


Msk network l.jpg

Manhattan

- Memorial Hospital for Cancer and Allied Diseases

- Breast Examination Center of Harlem

- Integrative Medicine Outpatient Center

- MSK 64th Street

- MSK Counseling Center

- MSK Guttman Diagnostic Center

- Rockefeller Outpatient Pavilion

- Sidney Kimmel Center for Prostate and Urologic Cancer

Long Island

- MSK Suffolk Outpatient Center (Commack)

- MSK at Suffolk (Hauppauge)

- MSK at Mercy Medical Center

New Jersey

- MSK at Saint Clare's in Denville

- MSK at Saint Clare's in Dover

Westchester

- MSK at Phelps Memorial Hospital Center

MSK Network

In development


Slide6 l.jpg

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

  • Oldest and largest private institution devoted to patient care, education and research in cancer

  • Consistently ranked one of top cancer centers by US News & World Report and other surveys

  • 8700 employees; 700 MD’s and PhD’s,

  • 19,000 new patient visits annually

  • Operating expenses: $1.5 billion

  • 445 active clinical protocols and $117 million in new grants and contracts in 2005


Slide7 l.jpg

Workforce (non-clinical) Diversity at MSKCC:The Analysis

  • Diversity Task force formed to review issues

  • Analyzed employee data, industry trends, demographic data and diversity best practices.

    • Entire population is diverse

    • Less diversity at higher levels

    • Low turnover at senior levels

    • Low retention at lower levels

Dillon-Weed, MSKCC 2005


Slide8 l.jpg

Workforce Diversity at MSKCC: The Analysis

  • Partnered with diversity consultants for continued analysis and input

    Analysis included additional data review, task force and employee interviews

Dillon-Weed, MSKCC 2005


Slide9 l.jpg

Workforce Diversity at MSKCC: Recommendations

  • Build cultural competency

    • Provide diversity training

    • Establish cultural diversity advisory board

    • Define linguistic capabilities needed to better service potential target communities

Dillon-Weed, MSKCC 2005


Slide10 l.jpg

Workforce Diversity at MSKCC: Recommendations

  • Recruitment and Retention Strategy

    • Identify high potential minorities to prepare for advancement

    • Implement a mentoring program focusing on mentoring across differences

    • Provide training programs to improve skills and build on existing training opportunities

Dillon-Weed, MSKCC 2005


Slide11 l.jpg

Workforce Diversity at MSKCC: Next Steps

  • Communicate diversity vision to employees

  • Provide training for all management in 2005

  • Ensure accountability

Dillon-Weed, MSKCC 2005


Slide12 l.jpg

Adding Diversity to the Mission Statement

Mission (Memorial Hospital) revised 11/8/04 :

  • The mission of Memorial is to maintain its leadership role as a preeminent institution for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and cure of cancer and associated diseases through excellence, vision, and cost-effectiveness in patient care, research, education and outreach programs.

  • In fulfillment of its mission, the Hospital must:

    Foster an environment that supports diversity through the support and enhancement of initiatives in the areas of patient care, research, education and outreach.


Slide13 l.jpg

Office of Diversity Programs: Rationale

  • Disparities are found in measures of cancer incidence, treatment, and survival based on race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status

  • Reduction of disparities remains a priority for the national cancer research agenda

  • MSKCC should be a leader in the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer-related health disparities


Slide14 l.jpg

“Branding” Diversity at MSKCC


Slide15 l.jpg

MSKCC Office of Diversity Programs Organization and Staff

Office of the President


Slide16 l.jpg

MSKCC Office of Diversity Programs Goals

  • Enhance institutional diversity through training, recruitment, and retention of underrepresented minority faculty and professional staff

  • Increase utilization of MSKCC prevention, screening, and treatment programs by racial/ethnic minorities and the underserved

  • Increase participation of racial/ethnic minorities and the underserved in the MSKCC clinical trials program

  • Develop a Research Program whose focus is the reduction and elimination of cancer health disparities


Slide17 l.jpg

Castillo, L Diversity in the Physician Workforce Facts and Figures 2006 AAMC www.aamc.org/factsandfigures


Slide18 l.jpg

Castillo-Page Minorities in Medical Education Facts and Figures 2005 AAMC www.aamc.org/factsandfigures


Slide19 l.jpg

Castillo-Page Minorities in Medical Education Facts and Figures 2005 AAMC www.aamc.org/factsandfigures


Slide20 l.jpg

Castillo-Page Minorities in Medical Education Facts and Figures 2005 AAMC www.aamc.org/factsandfigures


Slide21 l.jpg

Castillo-Page Minorities in Medical Education Facts and Figures 2005 AAMC www.aamc.org/factsandfigures


Slide22 l.jpg

Castillo-Page Minorities in Medical Education Facts and Figures 2005 AAMC www.aamc.org/factsandfigures


Slide23 l.jpg

Castillo, L Diversity in the Physician Workforce Facts and Figures 2006 AAMC www.aamc.org/factsandfigures


Slide24 l.jpg

Castillo, L Diversity in the Physician Workforce Facts and Figures 2006 AAMC www.aamc.org/factsandfigures


Slide25 l.jpg

Castillo, L Diversity in the Physician Workforce Facts and Figures 2006 AAMC www.aamc.org/factsandfigures


Slide26 l.jpg

Castillo, L Diversity in the Physician Workforce Facts and Figures 2006 AAMC www.aamc.org/factsandfigures


Race ethnicity of memorial hospital faculty l.jpg

Race/Ethnicity of Memorial Hospital Faculty

Data from “Employee Personal Data Form” MSKCC Human Resources as of 12/25/05


Race ethnicity of memorial hospital faculty vs u s medical school faculty 2004 l.jpg

Race/Ethnicity of Memorial Hospital Faculty vs. U.S. Medical School Faculty 2004

* Minorities in Medical Education: Facts and Figures 2005, Association of American Medical Colleges 2005.


Slide29 l.jpg

Minority Faculty Recruitment Strategies

  • Intramural

    • MSKCC fellows

  • Local/Regional

    • Medical School Office of Minority Affairs

    • Local chapters minority professional societies

  • National

    • National Medical Association, National Hispanic Medical Association, Association of American Indian Physicians, Association of Academic Minority Physicians, Association of Black Academic Surgeons

    • AACR-MICR, ASCO, ASH, SSO, American College of Surgeons, AMA

    • NCI, American Cancer Society, Foundations-RWJ

    • Faculty at other institutions


Fellowship status mh faculty fellow pool 2000 2005 l.jpg

Fellowship Status MH Faculty Fellow Pool 2000-2005

Data from “Employee Personal Data Form” MSKCC Human Resources as of 12/25/05,


Slide31 l.jpg

Training Core: Strategies

  • Survey minority MSKCC faculty regarding recruitment, retention, promotion, and institutional diversity “climate”

  • Communicate goal of faculty diversity to department chairs, service chiefs, program leaders and laboratory heads and develop “best practices” strategies based on discipline.

  • Fund clinical and laboratory research fellowships for minority physicians and scientists.


Slide32 l.jpg

Training Core: Strategies

  • Outreach to minority health professions and scientific societies, minority serving graduate and medical schools.

  • Expand and publicize existing “pipeline” programs

    • High school programs; “Summer Exposure”

    • Summer Medical Student Fellowship Program

    • Summer undergraduate student program at SKI


Strategies to increase diversity in the medical workforce fueling the high school pipeline l.jpg

Strategies to Increase Diversity in the Medical Workforce: Fueling the High School Pipeline

CCNY-MSKCC Partnership Inaugurates Program for Inner City Students

"Growing up, my basketball coach was instrumental in my development," said Raja Flores, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center thoracic surgeon and mentor to six high school students who participated in Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's inaugural Summer Exposure Program. "I've always wanted to go back to the neighborhood to coach, but as a surgeon I'm just too busy. However, what I've been able to do through this program is help kids who remind me of myself back then. I've been where they are now and I'm here to say 'You can do it.'"

A component of the City College of New York (CCNY) and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center partnership -- funded by a five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute to promote collaborations between minority-serving academic institutions and comprehensive cancer centers -- the six-week summer program was designed to expose minority and inner city students to clinical and research opportunities in oncology. Five students were recruited from the CCNY High School of Mathematics, Science and Engineering, and the sixth from the Greenwich Day School in Connecticut.

Raja Flores (in green scrubs) demonstrates laparoscopic surgical techniques to students (from left) Julian Carrasquillo, Aleyah Soleyn, Timon Ajlan, and Kristina Butron.

CCNY-MSKCC Partnership Inaugurates Program for Inner City Students Center News October 2005 www.mskcc.org


Diversity in cancer clinical trials l.jpg

Diversity in Cancer Clinical Trials


Health disparities in oncology l.jpg

“Health Disparities in Oncology….”

..exist based on

  • Race/ethnicity

  • Socioeconomic Status

  • Age

    ..are found in measures of

  • Incidence

  • Treatment

  • Survival


Cancer incidence rates by race and ethnicity 1998 2002 l.jpg

Cancer Incidence Rates* by Race and Ethnicity, 1998-2002

Rate Per 100,000

*Age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population.

†Hispanic is not mutually exclusive from whites, African Americans, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians.

Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2002, Division of Cancer Control and

Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2005.


Percent distribution of prior pap test by race ethnicity l.jpg

Percent distribution of prior Pap test by race/ethnicity

Benard et al. Cancer Causes and Control 12:61-68,2001.


Cancer death rates by sex and race us 1975 2002 l.jpg

Cancer Death Rates* by Sex and Race, US, 1975-2002

Rate Per 100,000

African American men

White men

African American women

White women

*Age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population.

Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2002, Division of Cancer Control and

Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2005.


Cancer survival by site and race 1995 2001 l.jpg

Cancer Survival*(%) by Site and Race,1995-2001

%

Difference

African

Site

White

American

All Sites6656 10

Breast (female)9076 14

Colon 6555 10

Esophagus1610 6

Leukemia4938 11

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma6152 9

Oral cavity6240 22

Prostate10097 3

Rectum6556 9

Urinary bladder8364 19

Uterine cervix7566 9

Uterine corpus8662 24

*5-year relative survival rates based on cancer patients diagnosed from 1995 to 2001 and followed through 2002.

Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2002, Division of Cancer Control and

Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2005.


Racial and ethnic disparities cancer outcome contributing factors l.jpg

Racial and Ethnic Disparities Cancer Outcome : Contributing Factors

  • Age and Socioeconomic status

  • Access to screening and treatment services

  • Comorbid illness

  • Racial discrimination

  • Cultural beliefs

  • High Risk Behaviors

  • Compliance with treatment

  • Treatment Aggressiveness

  • Biologic Differences


Population size and diversity in nyc 1900 2000 l.jpg

Population Size and Diversity in NYC, 1900-2000


Population diversity new york city l.jpg

Population Diversity New York City

Interim Report of the GNYHA Advisory Task Force on Diversity in Health Care Leadership October 2005 www.gnyha.com


Regulating diversity in cancer clinical trials l.jpg

Regulating Diversity in Cancer Clinical Trials


Slide44 l.jpg

National Institutes of Health Policy on the Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical Research

NIH Revitalization Act of 1993( Public Law 103-43)

effective September 1994

  • NIH ensure that women and minorities and their subpopulations be included in all clinical research

  • Women and minorities be included in Phase III trials in numbers adequate to allow for valid analyses of differences in intervention effect

  • Cost is not allowed as a reason for excluding these groups

  • NIH initiate programs and support for outreach efforts to recruit and retain women and minorities as participants in clinical studies.

Farley et al. SGO 2000

DHHS: NIH Monitoring Adherence to the NIH policy on the Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical Research

NIH Tracking/Inclusion Committee 2005


Nih definition of clinical research l.jpg

NIH Definition of Clinical Research

  • Patient-oriented research.

    Research conducted with human subjects (or on material of human origin such as tissues, specimens and cognitive phenomena) for which an investigator (or colleague) directly interacts with human subjects. Excluded from this definition are in vitro studies that utilize human tissues that cannot be linked to a living individual. Patient-oriented research includes: (a) mechanisms of human disease, (b) therapeutic interventions, (c) clinical trials, and (d) development of new technologies;

Sex, Gender and Minority Inclusion in NIH Clinical Research: What Investigators Need to Know

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/women_min/training/index.htm


Nih definition of clinical research continued l.jpg

NIH Definition of Clinical Research (continued)

(2)  Epidemiologic and behavioral studies;

(3)  Outcomes research and health services research.

Sex, Gender and Minority Inclusion in NIH Clinical Research: What Investigators Need to Know

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/women_min/training/index.htm


Slide47 l.jpg

Decision Tree for Inclusion of Minorities

In NIH-Defined Phase III Clinical Trials

Is a NIH-Defined Phase III Clinical Trial proposed?

NO

YES

Go To: Decision Tree for Inclusion of Minorities (not an NIH-Defined Phase III Clinical Trial)

  • Is minority representation acceptable?

  • 1. Strong evidence exists for significant racial or ethnic differences in intervention effect and study design or analysis can answer primary question(s) separately for each relevant subgroup and the analysis plan can detect significant differences in intervention effect? (Code M1: both U.S. minorities andnon-minorities included)or

  • 2. Strong evidence exists for NO significant racial or ethnic differences in intervention effect?

  • (Code M1: both U.S. minorities andnon-minorities, or Code M2: U.S. minorities only,

    • or Code M3: U.S. non-minorities only)or

  • 3. No clear evidence exists for or against significant racial or ethnic differences in intervention effect and study design and analysis plans will permit valid analysis of a differential intervention effect?

  • (Code M1: both U.S. minorities andnon-minorities)or

  • 4. Some or all minority groups or subgroups are excluded because inclusion is inappropriate with respect to their health or because the research question is not relevant to them? (Code M1: both U.S. minorities andnon-minorities, or Code M2: U.S. minorities only, or Code M3: U.S. non-minorities only)or

  • 5. ONLY foreign (non-U.S.) subjects are involved and study design addresses any known scientific reasons for examining in-country minority group or subgroup differences (Code M5: no U.S. subjects involved)

YES

NO

ACCEPTABLE

M1A, M2A, M3A, M4A, or M5A

Describe: inclusion plan, any exclusions of minority subpopulations, plans for analysis and outreach. State why this is scientifically acceptable.

ABSENT

No Information

UNACCEPTABLE

M1U, M2U, M3U, M4U, or M5U

Negative impact on score.

Describe: inclusion plan, any exclusions of minority subpopulations, plans for analysis and outreach. State why this is scientifically unacceptable.

UNACCEPTABLE

Contact

Scientific Review Administrator

Summary of CodesRepresentation is scientifically…

Minority RepresentationAcceptableUnacceptable

Both minorities and non-minorities includedM1AM1U

Minorities onlyM2AM2U

Non-minorities onlyM3AM3U

Unknown (cannot be known)M4AM4U

ONLY foreign (non-U.S.) subjects in studyM5AM5U

NIH/OER April 26, 2001


Nih policy on reporting race and ethnicity data subjects in clinical research fy2002 l.jpg

NIH Policy on Reporting Race and Ethnicity Data: Subjects in Clinical Research FY2002

NIH adopted 1997 OMB revised minimum standards

  • “ The categories in this classification are social-political constructs and should not be interpreted as being anthropological in nature”

  • “ Using self-reporting or self-identification to collect an individual’s data on ethnicity and race, investigators should use two separate questions with ethnicity information collected first followed by the option to select more than one racial designation”.

Farley et al. SGO 2000

DHHS: NIH Monitoring Adherence to the NIH policy on the Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical Research

NIH Tracking/Inclusion Committee 2005


Omb revised minimum standards for federal data on race and ethnicity directive 15 l.jpg

OMB Revised Minimum Standards for Federal Data on Race and Ethnicity: Directive 15

Ethnic Categories:

  • Hispanic or Latino: a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

  • Not Hispanic or Latino

DHHS: NIH Monitoring Adherence to the NIH policy on the Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical Research

NIH Tracking/Inclusion Committee 2005


Omb revised minimum standards for federal data on race and ethnicity directive 1552 l.jpg

OMB Revised Minimum Standards for Federal Data on Race and Ethnicity: Directive 15

Racial Categories:

  • American Indian or Alaska Native: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North, Central, or South America, and who maintains tribal affiliations or community attachment.

  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including for example, Cambodia, china, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.

  • Black or African American: A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.

  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.

  • White : A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

DHHS: NIH Monitoring Adherence to the NIH policy on the Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical Research

NIH Tracking/Inclusion Committee 2005


Sms race ethnicity data collection l.jpg

SMS Race/Ethnicity Data Collection


Cdb race data collection l.jpg

CDB Race Data Collection


Cdb ethnicity data collection l.jpg

CDB Ethnicity Data Collection


Race and ethnicity data at mskcc who uses it l.jpg

Race and Ethnicity Data at MSKCC Who Uses It?

  • Clinical Research Database

  • OMS

  • Cardiology

  • Laboratory

  • Electronic Medical Record

  • Pathology

  • Disease Management System

  • Transition for Quality

  • PACS

  • Philips Echo system

  • Guttman Radiology system


Race ethnicity in disparities research challenge of reporting data l.jpg

Race/Ethnicity in Disparities Research; Challenge of Reporting Data

1/89-10/00; NEJM, JAMA, Ann Int Med 253 trials in diabetes, cardio-vascular, HIV/AIDS, cancer

  • 46% reported only 1 or 2 categories

  • 2 trials reported results by race/ethnicity

Corbie-Smith et al. J Clin Epidemiol. 2003;56:416-20.


Diversity challenges cancer clinical trials l.jpg

Diversity Challenges Cancer Clinical Trials


Barriers to clinical trial participation l.jpg

Barriers to Clinical Trial Participation

NCI Comprehensive Cancer Center Survey Study n=319 newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer 33% were offered participation in a trial Age and race were only predictors of investigator offer 42% whites vs 21% of blacks were offered CT (p=.0009)

Clinical Trial Barriers at Howard University Cancer Center n=235 newly diagnosed cancer patients 8.5% eligible , 60% of eligible enrolled 27% of pts not eligible due to co-morbidities, performance status, premature death, or short life expectancy

Adams-Campbell et al J Clin Oncol 2004;22:730-34

Simon et al J Clin Oncol 2004;22:2046-52


Consent rates for health research by race and ethnicity l.jpg

Consent Rates for Health Research byRace and Ethnicity

Non-Therapeutic Trials

African-Americans 82.2%

Non-Hispanic Whites 83.5%

Hispanics 86.1%

Therapeutic Trials

African-Americans 45.3%

Non-Hispanic Whites 41.8%

Hispanics 55.9%

Surgery Trials

Minorities 65.8%

Non-Hispanic Whites 47.8%

Wendler D, et al Are racial and ethnic minorities less willing to participate in health research? PLoS Med 3(2):e19


Barriers to minority participation in cancer clinical trials l.jpg

Barriers to Minority Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials

  • Mistrust

  • Lack of awareness

  • Lack of invitation

  • Cultural Beliefs

  • Eligibility criteria/comorbid conditions

  • Cost/lack of insurance

  • Language/linguistic differences

  • Physician lack of awareness

Intercultural Cancer Council. Cancer Clinical Trials: Participation by Underrepresented Populations

http://iccnetwork.org/cancerfacts/cfs11.htm


Minority accrual to nci sponsored trials in colorectal breast lung and prostate cancer l.jpg

Minority Accrual to NCI-sponsored Trials in Colorectal, Breast, Lung and Prostate Cancer

Murthy VH. Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials Race, Sex and Age-Based Disparities. JAMA 2004;291:2720-2726.


Minority enrollment nci cancer clinical trials colorectal breast lung and prostate l.jpg

Minority Enrollment NCI Cancer Clinical Trials: Colorectal, Breast, Lung and Prostate

Murthy VH. Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials Race, Sex and Age-Based Disparities. JAMA 2004;291:2720-2726.


Accruals to mskcc protocols 2005 by race and ethnicity l.jpg

Accruals to MSKCC Protocols 2005by Race and Ethnicity


Slide65 l.jpg

MSKCC Office of Diversity Programs Goals

  • Enhance institutional diversity through training, recruitment, and retention of underrepresented minority faculty and professional staff

  • Increase utilization of MSKCC prevention, screening, and treatment programs by racial/ethnic minorities and the underserved

  • Increase participation of racial/ethnic minorities and the underserved in the MSKCC clinical trials program

  • Develop a Research Program whose focus is the reduction and elimination of cancer health disparities


Slide66 l.jpg

Clinical Care Strategies

  • Publicize existing community outreach to minority patients and their referring physicians

    • Breast Examination Center of Harlem

    • Ralph Lauren Center for Cancer Care and Prevention

  • Disease based assessment of minority patient issues and development of disease-specific strategies to provide culturally competent care

  • Expand services for LEP patients

  • Targeted marketing of minority populations who could utilize Regional Network satellites


Slide67 l.jpg

MSKCC Office of Diversity Programs Goals

  • Enhance institutional diversity through training, recruitment, and retention of underrepresented minority faculty and professional staff

  • Increase utilization of MSKCC prevention, screening, and treatment programs by racial/ethnic minorities and the underserved

  • Increase participation of racial/ethnic minorities and the underserved in the MSKCC clinical trials program

  • Develop a Research Program whose focus is the reduction and elimination of cancer health disparities


Slide68 l.jpg

Research Core: Strategies

  • Office of Clinical Research Outreach Group

  • MSKCC protocols at minority-serving institutions

  • Collaborative research with minority serving institutions

  • Outreach to minority patient advocacy groups for design and conduct of clinical research in their disease site and population


Opportunities for research mskcc l.jpg

Opportunities for Research: MSKCC

  • CCNY/MSKCC U56 Partnership Grant

  • Queens Cancer Center

  • SUNY Downstate Medical Center

  • Ralph Lauren Center for Cancer Care and Prevention

  • Breast Examination Center of Harlem


Queens health network service area l.jpg

Queens Health Network Service Area

Service Area & Facilities

Community Profile

  • Approximately 1 million people in NW Queens

  • Diverse population of recent immigrants

  • Hispanic and Asian predominant in NW Queens

  • Approximately 600,000 people in South Queens

  • Growing immigrant population from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh & Caribbean in South Queens

  • African-American & Hispanic predominant in South Queens

Kemeny QCC 2004


Queens cancer center l.jpg

Queens Cancer Center

  • Grants submitted with MSK:

    • To NCI: Multiethnic Patient Navigators Program

    • To NY State DOH:Smoking Cessation Program

    • To NCI:Colorectal Screening in Public Hospital Primary Care Practices

    • To CDC:Methods to Increase Colorectal Screening in NYC’s Public Hospital System

    • To Lance Armstrong Foundation: ENACCT Pilot Education Program

    • To NCI: Networking

Kemeny QCC 2004


Resources for mskcc investigators l.jpg

Resources for MSKCC Investigators

  • Office of Diversity Programs

  • Office of Clinical Research

  • Behavorial and Psychosocial Research Consultation Service

  • Language Assistance Program


Slide73 l.jpg

Research Core Strategies

  • Coordinate existing, and develop new laboratory, clinical, and outcomes research focused on reduction and elimination of cancer disparities

    • CCNY/MSKCC Partnership U56 grant

    • Health Outcomes Research Group Projects

    • BCRF Navigator Grant RLCCP

    • Lance Armstrong Foundation Survivorship Community Partners Grant


Slide74 l.jpg

Diversity in Academia/Research: Strategic Plan

  • “Affirm the value of diversity to the Institution

  • Assess the institutional climate for diversity

  • Develop a plan, guided by research, experiences at peer institutions, and results from the systematic assessment of the campus climate for diversity, for implementing constructive change that includes specific goals, time-table and pragmatic activities.”

In the Nation’s Compelling Interest; Ensuring Diversity in the Health Care Workforce.

IOM, Washington 2004 p153.


  • Login