reading comprehension in a nutshell n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Reading Comprehension in a Nutshell PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Reading Comprehension in a Nutshell

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 87

Reading Comprehension in a Nutshell - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 175 Views
  • Updated on

Reading Comprehension in a Nutshell. Sara Humphreys & Gail Neff VANAS, Caracas 2010. 1. About Us. Sara enjoys finding out how to unlock reading strategies for her grade 4 students. Gail is constantly on a search to help her grade 2 students naturally do what good readers do. 2.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Reading Comprehension in a Nutshell


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Reading Comprehensionin a Nutshell Sara Humphreys & Gail Neff VANAS, Caracas 2010 1

    2. About Us Sara enjoys finding out how to unlock reading strategies for her grade 4 students. Gail is constantly on a search to help her grade 2 students naturally do what good readers do. 2

    3. Importance of Strategic Reading “If you read and comprehend what you read, it stays in your brain. But if you read and don’t comprehend what you read, it will just go in one side of your brain and SWOOSH real fast right out the other side.” Jake Scheffler, Grade 7 3

    4. Why Use Strategies? • To set a purpose • To see how others connect • To understand characters • To have a clearer picture • To be actively involved (keep from being bored) • To better remember what we read • To answer the questions we have • To extend our existing knowledge • To understand complex concepts 4

    5. The Reader’s Importance “Readers usually grossly underestimate their own importance. If a reader cannot create a book along with the writer, the book will never come alive…the author and reader know each other. They meet in the bridge of words.” Madeleine L’Engle 5

    6. Our BIG SIX • Making Connections • Visualizing • Predicting & Inferring • Questioning • Monitoring & Clarifying • Synthesizing 6

    7. Making Connections Schema is the background knowledge and experience readers connect with the text. Good readers access their schema naturally making connections as they read. 7

    8. Three in One 8

    9. How To Teach Connections • Model how to make meaningful connections that help you understand the text better. • Provide plenty of guided practice. • Challenge students to analyze how their connections contribute to their understanding. 9

    10. Readers’ Toolsfor Connections Providing our young readers with bookmarks helps to remind them of the strategy they are practicing. 10

    11. Readers’ Toolsfor Connections Double Entry Journal 11

    12. Readers’ Toolsfor Connections The Connection Pie 12

    13. Readers’ Toolsfor Connections Rotten Ralph’s Rotten Christmas Ramona Quimby A “Connection Pie” by a 2nd grade student 13

    14. Readers’ Toolsfor Connections 14

    15. 15

    16. 16

    17. 17

    18. 3 Point Interview Making Connections/Using Schema 1. When you read that story did it remind you of anything you know about? What? Why did it remind you? 2. Are there things you know about or things in your life that help you to understand this book? 3. What do you understand now that you didn’t understand before? Adaptation of Major Point Interview found in Mosaic of Thought (Keene & Zimmerman, 1997). 18

    19. Assessing Connections 19

    20. Visualizing Visualizing is the creation of a vivid mental picture in the mind. Good readers picture what is happening while they are reading. 20

    21. Visualizing “Sketch and Stretch” 21

    22. How To Teach Visualizing • Model how to make meaningfulmental images that help youunderstand the text better. • Provide plenty of guided practice. • Challenge students to analyze how their visualizations contribute to their understanding. 22

    23. Readers’ Toolsfor Visualizing Providing our young readers with bookmarks helps to remind them of the strategy they are practicing. 23

    24. Readers’ Toolsfor Visualizing 24

    25. Readers’ Toolsfor Visualizing Ralph Fletcher 25

    26. 3 Point Interview Visualizing • When you were reading this story did you make any pictures or images in your head? • Do the pictures or images help you to understand the story better? • What do you understand now about the story that you didn’t understand before? Adaptation of Major Point Interview found in Mosaic of Thought (Keene & Zimmerman, 1997). 26

    27. Assessing Visualizing 27

    28. Predicting and Inferring • Inferring is making personal meaning from text that is not stated explicitly. • It is a mental combining of a reader’s schema and what is read. • Predicting is using what you know to make a good guess about what will happen next. 28

    29. Predicting and Inferring Good readers think about what’s going to happen and make predictions based on what they read. Good readers revise their inferences as they read more, and when they hear other interpretations. 29

    30. Predicting and Inferring 30

    31. How to Teach Predicting and Inferring • Model how to make meaningful predictions and inferences that help you understand the text better. • Provide plenty of guided practice. • Challenge students to analyze how their predictions and inferences contribute to their understanding. 31

    32. Readers’ Tools forPredicting and Inferring Providing our young readers with bookmarks helps to remind them of the strategy they are practicing. 32

    33. Readers’ Tools forPredicting and Inferring An “I bet…” journal entry from a 2nd grader. 33

    34. Readers’ Tools forPredicting and Inferring 34

    35. Readers’ Tools forPredicting and Inferring When good readers come to words that are unfamiliar, they search for context clues and make a good guess. 35

    36. Readers’ Tools forPredicting and Inferring 36

    37. 3 Point Interview Making Predictions and Inferences 1. Can you predict what is about to happen? Why did you make that prediction? What helped you in the story figure that out? 2. What did the author mean by………? What in the story helped you know? 3. What do you understand now that you didn’t understand before? Adaptation of Major Point Interview found in Mosaic of Thought (Keene & Zimmerman, 1997). 37

    38. Assessing Predicting and Inferring 38

    39. Questioning Asking questions helps students clarify and deepen understanding of the text. Good readers ask themselves questions as they read. 39

    40. Questioning Thick (Inferential) vs. Thin (Factual) 40

    41. How to Teach Questioning • Model how to ask meaningful questions that help you understand the text better. • Provide plenty of guided practice. • Challenge students to analyze how their questions contribute to their understanding. 41

    42. Readers’ Tools for Questioning Providing our young readers with bookmarks helps to remind them of the strategy they are practicing. 42

    43. Readers’ Tools for Questioning 43 Source: readinglady.com

    44. Readers’ Tools for Questioning 44

    45. Readers’ Tools for Questioning . 45

    46. Readers’ Tools for Questioning 46

    47. 3 Point Interview Asking Questions 1. What did you wonder about while you were reading this text? 2. What additional questions do you have about this book now? What are you still curious about? 3. What do you understand now that you didn’t understand before? 47

    48. Assessing Questioning 48

    49. Monitor and Clarify Readers need explicit instruction to: • Become aware of their thinking as they read. • Detect obstacles and confusions that derail understanding. • Understand how strategies can help repair meaning when it breaks down. 49

    50. Monitor and Clarify Good readers STOP to think about their reading and know what to do when they don’t understand. 50