Fourth Grade- Unit 2 Everyday Math Unit 3 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Fourth Grade- Unit 2 Everyday Math Unit 3

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  1. Fourth Grade- Unit 2Everyday Math Unit 3 Unit 3 Multiplication and Division; Number Sentences

  2. 4th Grade-Unit 2 (EM3 ) Notes • *no calculators • *Problem solving 1/week • *Read/write to million *calculations to 100,000 • *DO NOT USE THE WORD BALLPARK * instead of timed fact tests we strongly suggest doing a “running record” of x facts. ALWAYS do the readiness first • Use doc camera to show examples or base 10 blocks • * GAMES ARE TO BE PLAYED AND SUPERVISED EVERYDAY!!*

  3. 3.1 What’s My Rule: Function Machine Common Core Focus 4.OA5. Generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself. For example, given the rule “Add 3” and the starting number 1, generate terms in the resulting sequence and observe that the terms appear to alternate between odd and even numbers. Explain informally why the numbers will continue to alternate in this way. Lesson • -Readiness • -Mental Math and Reflexes • -Math Message • -Part 1 • -Enrichment • -Math Box no 2,4 • -Homelink Notes • In part 1 have students explain in writing their thinking in a notebook. Ex. Since the rule was -80 and I knew the out number, to solve I had to turn around and +80

  4. Make And Analyze A Pattern

  5. Make And Analyze A Pattern

  6. Extend A Pattern

  7. Use Patterns To Solve Problems Johnny is saving money to buy a new toy for $60. He has $15 saved. He earns $7 a week mowing his neighbor’s lawn. How many weeks will he have to work to save enough money to buy his new toy? Mary has 32 tickets for the carnival. Each ride costs 5 tickets. How many tickets will she have left after 4 rides?

  8. Functions and Patterns Rule: # of sides = # of triangles x _3__ Bar Model Bar Model Number Model S=2x3 S=6 Number Model S=3x3 S=9

  9. Functions and Patterns Bar Model Number Model S=___x ___ S=_____ Rule: # of sides = # of triangles x ___ Bar Model Number Model S=___x ___ S=_____ Rule: # of sides= # of rectangles x ___

  10. Functions and Patterns Bar Model Number Model S=___x ___ S=_____ Rule: # of sides = # of pentagons x ____ Bar Model Number Model S=___x ___ S=_____ Rule: # of sides= # of hexagons x ___

  11. Each ____________ has _________________________ Rule: # of ___________= # of ____________x________ Bar Model

  12. Number Grids

  13. 3.2 Multiplication Facts Common Core Focus • 4.oa.1. Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35 = 5 × 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. • 4.oa.4. Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1–100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is prime or composite. Lesson • -Readiness- do first • -Mental Math and Reflexes • -Math Message • -Part 1 • -Part 2 • -Math Box no 3,4,5 Notes • Refer to chart as a “factor table/multiples table” NOT x table.

  14. Products

  15. Learning Multiplication Facts COUNTING Identity Property MultiplES SKIP COUNTING Commutative Property TURN AROUND FACTS Distributive Property PARTS AND WHOLES

  16. Identity PropertyJust Count! 1 group of 6 has 6 1x6=6 6 groups of 1 have 6 6x1=6 • This means that you can multiply 1 to any number...  and it keeps its identity!  The number stays the same! • 1x8=8 8x1=8 1x67=67 67x1=67 • 1x234=234 234x1=234

  17. Identity Property 1 group of objects is the same as the number of objects 1 group of 5=5 1x5=5

  18. Skip Counting…Is Finding Multiples

  19. Multiples and Multiplication Facts

  20. Multiples and Multiplication Facts

  21. Number Grids- Finding Multiples

  22. Commutative Property(Addition Turn Around Facts) 10 7+3 = 3+7

  23. Commutative Property(Multipication Turn Around Facts) 18 3x6 = 6x3

  24. Commutative Property(Turn Around Facts) ____ =

  25. Commutative Property(Turn Around Facts)

  26. Distributive Property 5+2=7 5x2=10 2x2=4 5x2=10 2x2= 4 7x2=14

  27. Distributive Property 7 X 12 10 + 2 7 x (10+2) (7 x 10) + (7 x 2)

  28. Distributive Property

  29. 9 Facts What do you notice about the digits? _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ Why do you think that happens? ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________

  30. 9 Facts- Look at The Patterns

  31. Solving Problems By Knowing How Numbers Are Connected • What do you notice about the how the numbers are changing?

  32. Solving Problems By Knowing How Numbers Are Connected • What do you notice about the how the numbers are changing?

  33. Solving Problems By Knowing How Numbers Are Connected 2 x 5 = 1 x 10 4 x5 = 2 x 10 x 5 = x 10 x 5 = x 10

  34. Solving Problems By Knowing How Numbers Are Connected • Based on what you discovered from the number beads, explain how you can use numbers that are connected to solve multiplication problems. Remember to explain the ‘rule’ and give an example. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  35. Arrays, Number Models and Bar Models Array 6 3 Number Model 3x6=18 Bar Model

  36. Arrays, Number Models and Bar Models Array 3 6 Number Model 6x3=18 Bar Model

  37. Multiplication Bar Modeling(Factors and Products) Number Model: _____________x_____________=_____________

  38. Square Numbers

  39. Square Numbers

  40. Square Numbers-Noticing Patterns

  41. 2 x____=____ 3x____=___ 4x____=____ 5x____=____ 6x____=____ 7 x____=____ 8 x____=____ 9x____=____ 10 x____=____

  42. x2 x3 x4

  43. x5 x6 x7

  44. x8 x9 x10

  45. 3.2b Discovering Prime and Composite Common Core Focus • 4.oa.1. Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35 = 5 × 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. • 4.oa.4. Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1–100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is prime or composite. Lesson • Prime/Composite Numbers • -Enrichment from 3.2- MM 77 • - INSERT project 1 from Grade 5- make sure each child has 8 different colored pencils • -Study link 3.2 Notes • Insert guided/independent practice for Prime/composite numbers • With project- notice the #’s that have more than 1 factor- keep paper in their folders for reference

  46. Prime and Composite Numbers • Create all the possible arrays for:_____________

  47. 3.2c Factors (Grade 5- 1.4) Common Core Focus • 4.oa.1. Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35 = 5 × 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. • 4.oa.4. Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1–100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is prime or composite. Lesson • Readiness: Fact Families: Use 3 questions to write in notebooks • Mental Math and Reflexes • Message • Part 1 • Part 2 • NO boxes • Homelink: use! Notes • Teach and Play Factor Captor

  48. 2 x____=____ 3x____=___ 4x____=____ 5x____=____ 6x____=____ 7 x____=____ 8 x____=____ 9x____=____ 10 x____=____

  49. Factor Captor

  50. 3.2d Prime and Composite Numbers (1.6 from Grade 5) Common Core Focus • 4.oa.1. Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35 = 5 × 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. • 4.oa.4. Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1–100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is prime or composite. Lesson • Mental Math and Reflexes • -Math Message • -Part 1 • (NO pt 2,) • Boxes No 1 • - Homelink1.6 Notes