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Objective: To examine the conflict between President Johnson and Congress. PowerPoint Presentation
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Objective: To examine the conflict between President Johnson and Congress.

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Objective: To examine the conflict between President Johnson and Congress. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Objective: To examine the conflict between President Johnson and Congress.

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  1. Objective: To examine the conflict between President Johnson and Congress.

  2. Congress Breaks with the President • Congress bars SouthernCongressional delegates. • Joint Committee on Reconstruction created. • February, 1866  Presidentvetoed the Freedmen’sBureau bill. • March, 1866  Johnsonvetoed the 1866 Civil Rights Act. • Congress passed both bills over Johnson’s vetoes  1st in U. S. history!!

  3. Radical Reconstruction: The President and Congress Clash Background Information: Congress had enough votes to override all Presidential vetoes! President Johnson v. Congress Conflict #1 Congress passed the Civil Rights Act in 1866, giving U.S. citizenship to African-Americans. President Johnson vetoed the bill. Representatives in Congress overrode the veto. (with a 2/3 majority vote) Round 1 winner: CONGRESS!

  4. President Johnson v. Congress Conflict #2 Congress attempted to ratify the 14th Amendment, which would… …grant U.S. citizenship to all people born in the U.S., including former slaves. …make it illegal to discriminate against people, making black codes unconstitutional. President Johnson opposed the 14th Amendment and convinced all Southern states, except Tennessee, to vote against it. . Round 2 winner: It’s a DRAW!

  5. President Johnson v. Congress Conflict #3 Congress passed the Tenure of Office Act in 1867. This law stated that the President could not remove members of his Cabinet without Senate approval. So, Congress thinks I need THEIR approval to fire a member of my own Cabinet? HAH! Let’s see them stop me! DARN! Secretary Stanton, you’re FIRED! Tenure of Office Act Round 3 winner: Secretary of War Edwin Stanton Pres. Johnson CONGRESS!

  6. President Johnson v. Congress Conflict #4 Congress passed the Reconstruction Act in 1867. This law… …threw out all Southern states that refused to ratify the 14th Amendment. …divided the South Into five military districts, each ruled by a U.S. general. • …required all Southern • States to: • write a new state • Constitution. • ratify the 14th • Amendment. • allow all blacks the • right to vote. President Johnson vetoed the Reconstruction Act. . Round 4 winner: Representatives in Congress overrode the veto with a 2/3 majority vote. CONGRESS!

  7. Johnson the Martyr / Samson If my blood is to be shed because I vindicate the Union and the preservation of this government in its original purity and character, let it be shed; let an altar to the Union be erected, and then, if it is necessary, take me and lay me upon it, and the blood that now warms and animates my existence shall be poured out as a fit libation to the Union. (February 1866)

  8. 14th Amendment • Ratified in July, 1868. • Provide a constitutional guarantee of the rights and security of freed people. • Insure against neo-Confederate political power. • Enshrine the national debt while repudiating that of the Confederacy. • Southern states would be punished for denying the right to vote to black citizens!

  9. The Balance of Power in Congress

  10. Johnson’s “Swing around the Circle” The 1866 Bi-Election • A referendum on Radical Reconstruction. • Johnson made an ill-conceived propaganda tour around the country to push his plan. • Republicanswon a 3-1majority in both houses and gained control of every northern state.

  11. Radical Plan for Readmission • Civil authorities in the territories were subject to military supervision. • Required new state constitutions, includingblack suffrage and ratification of the 13th and 14th Amendments. • In March, 1867, Congress passed an act that authorized the military to enroll eligible black voters and begin the process of constitution making.

  12. Reconstruction Acts of 1867 • Military Reconstruction Act • Restart Reconstruction in the 10 Southern states that refused to ratify the 14th Amendment. • Divide the 10 “unreconstructed states” into 5 military districts.

  13. Military Reconstruction, 1867

  14. Reconstruction Acts of 1867 • Command of the Army Act • The President must issue all Reconstruction orders through the commander of the military. • Tenure of Office Act • The President could not remove any officials [esp. Cabinet members] without the Senate’s consent, if the position originally required Senate approval. • Designed to protect radicalmembers of Lincoln’s government. • A question of the constitutionality of this law. Edwin Stanton

  15. President Johnson’s Impeachment • Johnson removed Stanton in February, 1868. • Johnson replaced generals in the field who were more sympathetic to Radical Reconstruction. • The House impeached him on February 24 before even drawing up the charges by a vote of 126 – 47!

  16. The Senate Trial • 11 week trial. • Johnson acquitted 35 to 19 (one short of required 2/3s vote).

  17. President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Trial Ticket