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New Models of Learning for the21st Century : New Tech High School. Bob Pearlman 6th Annual Building Learning Communities Conference Boston, MA July 18, 2006. PowerPoint Slides at http://www.bobpearlman.org/BLC2006.htm. http://www.edutopia.org June 2006 issue.

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New Models of Learning for the21st Century : New Tech High School

Bob Pearlman

6th Annual Building Learning Communities Conference

Boston, MA

July 18, 2006

PowerPoint Slides at http://www.bobpearlman.org/BLC2006.htm

slide2

http://www.edutopia.org

June 2006 issue

Let's assume the No Child Left Behind Act works fine and that by 2014 every student meets the targeted standards and passes his or her state's exit exam. Will those students be successful as citizens and workers in the twentyfirst century?

Not a chance.

Let's further assume that each state's governor gets the one-on-one computer bug and equips all of each state's students with top-flight portable PCs. Will these students now be successful as citizens and workers in the twenty-first century?

Again, not a chance.

No matter how sophisticated the tools we put in classrooms, the curriculum designed to educate students to meet the new standards is sorely inadequate to help them after they leave school. In short, learning -- and schooling -- must be totally transformed.

results that matter 21st century skills and high school reform
“Results That Matter: 21st Century Skills and High School Reform”

Improving high schools requires the nation to redefine “rigor” to encompass not just mastery of core academic subjects, but also mastery of 21st century skills and content. Rigor must reflect all the results that matter for all high school graduates today. Today’s graduates need to be critical thinkers, problem solvers and effective communicators who are proficient in both core subjects and new, 21st century content and skills. These 21st century skills include learning and thinking skills, information and communications technology literacy skills, and life skills.

-- March 24, 2006

http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/

slide4

What are the key questions for building schools of the future?

What knowledge and skills do students need for the 21st century?

knowledge and skills

What learning curricula, activities, and experiences, foster 21st Century learning?

London Challenge Visualization, November 2004

curricula

What assessments for learning, school-based and national, foster student learning, engagement, and self-direction?

assessments

What physical learning environments (classroom, school, and real world) foster 21st century student learning?

facilities

How can technology support a 21st Century collaborative learning environment and support a learning community?

technology

slide6
SCANS U.S. Department of Labor Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills

COMPETENCIES - Effective workers can productively use:

  • Resources - allocating time, money, materials, space and staff.
  • Interpersonal Skills - working on teams, teaching others, serving customers, leading, negotiating, and working well with people from culturally diverse backgrounds.
  • Information - acquiring and evaluating data, organizing and maintaining files, interpreting and communication, and using computers to process information.
  • Systems - understanding social, organizational and technological systems, monitoring and correcting performance, and designing or improving systems.
  • Technology - selecting equipment and tools, applying technology to specific tasks, and maintaining and troubleshooting technologies.

FOUNDATIONS - Competence requires:

  • Basic Skills - reading, writing, arithmetic and mathematics, speaking and listening.
  • Thinking Skills - thinking creatively, making decisions, solving problems, seeing things in the mind's eye, knowing how to learn, and reasoning.
  • Personal Qualities - individual responsibilities, self-esteem, sociability, self-management, and integrity.

1992

slide9

New Technology HS

LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • WRITTEN COMMUNICATION
  • CAREER PREPARATION
  • CITIZENSHIP AND ETHICS
  • CURRICULAR LITERACY (CONTENT STANDARDS)
  • TECHNOLOGY LITERACY
  • COLLABORATION
  • CRITICAL THINKING
  • ORAL COMMUNICATION
slide10

What learning curricula, activities, and experiences, foster 21st Century learning? And what does schooling look like?

slide16

New Technology High School

Napa, California

http://www.newtechhigh.org/

  • Integrating technology into every class
  • Interdisciplinary and project-based
  • Internship class consisting of classroom curriculum and work-based learning in regional companies
  • Digital Portfolio

http://www.newtechfoundation.org/

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At the core is a student centered, project and problem based teaching strategy that is tied to both content standards and school wide learning outcomes.

project and problem based learning keys to 21st century learning
Project- and Problem-Based LearningKeys to 21st Century Learning
  • To learn collaboration, work in teams.
  • To learn critical thinking, take on complex problems.
  • To learn oral communication, present.
  • To learn written communication, write.
  • To learn technology, use technology.
  • To develop citizenship, take on civic and global issues.
  • To learn about careers, do internships.
  • To learn content, research and do all of the above.

NTHS teachers start each unit by throwing students into a realistic or real-world project that both engages interest and generates a list of things the student need to know. Projects are designed to tackle complex problems, requiring critical thinking. New Tech’s strategy is simple:

slide19

Each unit begins when students are presented with a complex, standards-based problem

Students form a team, develop a work contract and build a work plan

slide20

Students get to work!

Students are provided an online briefcase specific to the project with information, resources, links and assessment criteria that help guide them.

slide21

Students Need To Know

Student questions and “need to knows” drive classroom lectures and activities. Sometimes for the whole class … sometime for just one student

slide22

Students experiment and apply learning

Students test their ideas and experiment to find solutions and breakthroughs while receiving ongoing feedback from instructors.

slide23

Students get back to work!

Students work and collaborate in a business-like environment, where they know their deliverables and have the technology tools to do their jobs.

slide24

Students prepare to present

Students work on building presentations to repre-sent their work and defend their solutions

slide25

Students present their solutions!

Students present ideas through debates, skits, panels, presentations, etc… where their work is evaluated by peers, teachers, parents, and community

slide26

CURRICULUM INTEGRATION

  • COMMUNICATION STUDIES
    • 9TH Grade Language Arts
    • Drama
  • GLOBAL STUDIES
    • World History and Civilizations
    • 10th Grade Language Arts
  • AMERICAN STUDIES
    • United States History
    • American Literature
  • POLITICAL STUDIES
    • Government/Economics
    • Political Literature

2 teachers, 45-50 students, meeting for 2 hour blocks each day

  • SCIENTIFIC STUDIES
    • Algebra II
    • Physics
slide27

College Courses and Internships

    • Major impact on high school performance
    • Major impact on Post-secondary success
slide29

Transform the Secondary School Student Experience!

Personalization

Projects

Exhibitions

Digital Portfolios

Internships

Technology

slide30

What physical learning environments (classroom, school, and real world) foster 21st century student learning?

slide35

FACILITIES FRAMEWORK

Large classrooms that allow for team teaching, computers, group work and creates an environment that reflects school’s purpose.

Technology infrastructure to support 1:1 computer ratios

slide36

How can technology support a 21st Century collaborative learning environment and support a learning community?

slide37

TECHNOLOGY TOOLS

FOR …

  • Learning
  • Curriculum
  • Communication
  • Assessment
  • Scalability*
  • Computerized Tutorials
  • On-Line Curriculum
  • E-Library
  • Academic Systems
  • Project Standardization
  • Digital Textbooks
  • Document Libraries
  • Project Design Template
  • Online Curriculum
  • Internship Coordination
  • Student E-Mail
  • Parent E-Bulletin
  • Collaboration Database
  • Learning Logs
  • Digital Gradebooks
  • Student Journals
  • Support Databases
  • Account Management
  • PBL Unit Library
  • Customizable Templates
slide38

TOOLS: PROJECT BRIEFCASE

The Project Briefcase allows teachers to put all project materials in one spot for easy student access and to share with other teachers.

slide39

CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK

The Project Library allows teachers in our network of schools to search, view and download projects that other teachers have found successful.

slide40

TOOLS: COURSE AGENDA

The Course Agenda helps keep complicated projects organized.

slide47

Use technology to create a collaborative learning environment and a Learning Community

slide48

New Technology High School Grads:

          • Powerful
          • Articulate
          • Self-Directed
          • Collaborative
          • Leaders & Entrepreneurs
results that matter
RESULTS THAT MATTER
  • Post-Secondary Success
  • In 2005, Rockman et al conducted a six-month study of Napa New Technology High School (NTHS) alumni (8 graduating classes since opening in 1996). The study gathered feedback from NTHS graduates regarding their postsecondary education and/or career, 21st Century skills, knowledge and use of technology, and on what they valued most about their NTHS experience:
    • 89% of the responding alumni attended a 2-year or 4-year college/university or professional or technical institute.
    • 92% of respondents have applied some or a great deal of what they learned at NTHS to their postsecondary education or career.
    • 96% of the respondents would choose to attend NTHS again.
    • 40% of the alumni respondents were either majoring in STEM fields or were working in STEM professions.
  • High School Success
  • New Tech High School students graduate with a mastery of 21st Century knowledge and skills, prepared for college, career, and citizenship. New Tech High School uses multiple measures to assess student performance and school accountability, including measures of student engagement, academic success, 21st Century skills, and post-secondary success.  NTHS Results that Matter shows high school success data on student achievement, 21st Century Skills, graduation requirements, graduation rates, post-secondary enrollments and STEM Careers, Recognitions, and NTHS Network School Success .
  • http://www.newtechfoundation.org/html/Articles.html
slide51

NETWORK PROGRESS

2005/2006 School Year

Anchorage

2006/2007 School Year

Portland

N. Eugene

Chicago

NorthernCalifornia (8)

Denver

North Carolina (6)

Los Angeles (4)

Texas (1)

New Orleans(2)

new technology high network schools current
New Technology High Network Schools -- current

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

  • New Technology High School, Napa
  • Anderson New Technology High School, Anderson
  • Technology High School, Rohnert Park
  • Mare Island Technology (MIT) Academy High School, Vallejo
  • Sacramento New Technology High School, Sacramento
  • Marin School of Arts and Technology, Novato
  • Leonardo DaVinci High School, Davis
  • Castlemont Business& Information Technology School, Oakland

OREGON: BizTech High School, Portland, Oregon

ALASKA: Highland Tech High, Anchorage, Alaska

LOUISIANA

  • New Orleans New Technology High School, New Orleans
  • Patrick F. Taylor Science & Technology Academy, Jefferson Parish

COLORADO: Welby New Technology High School, Mapleton School District

CHICAGO: Little Village Infinity Math, Science and Technology High School

new technology high network schools starting 2006 7
New Technology High Network Schools – Starting 2006-7

TEXAS

  • Akins New Tech High School, Austin

OREGON

  • Riverside New Tech, Klamath Falls
  • School of IDEAS (Industry, Design, Engineering and Science), Eugene

NORTH CAROLINA

  • Camtech High School, Camden
  • Cherokee New Technology High School, Cherokee
  • East Wake HS of Integrated Technology, Wendell
  • CMS New Technology High School, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
  • Information Technology HS, Accelerated Learning Academy, Robeson County
  • Math, Science, and Technology High School, Laurinburg

LOS ANGELES

  • Los Angeles School of Global Studies, Local District #4
  • New Technology High School for Environmental Studies, Local District #4
  • Jefferson New Technology High School for Student Empowerment, Local District #5
  • Jordan New Technology High School, Local District #7
slide54

NEW TECHNOLOGY HIGH SCHOOL

Study Toursand Visits

(late September  March)

http://www.newtechfoundation.org

contact information
Contact Information

New Technology Foundation

Susan Schilling - CEO

www.newtechfoundation.org

707-253-4287

1746 Yajome

Napa, CA 94559

Bob Pearlman

Director of Strategic Planning

bobpearlman@mindspring.com

www.bobpearlman.org

520-881-9965

PowerPoint Slides at www.bobpearlman.org/blc2006.htm