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Overarching question: What should schools teach?
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  1. Overarching question: What should schools teach? • What’s the problem? • Not a problem of mastering repetitive, routine procedures • Weakness centers on inference, problem-solving, comprehension; critical thinking skills • Breuer: Making intelligent novices • Develop expertise • Develop expertise at becoming an expert • What is expert problem-solving?

  2. Can Problem-Solving be Taught? Problem of transfer… • Learning X vs. Learning to learn • Can general problem solving skills be learned? • Can metacognition be taught/fostered? • Metacognition in problem solving...

  3. 1. No: Problem-solving can’t be taught • Content knowledge is critical: • Johnson-Laird IF-THEN problem (Bruer pp. 61-62): • In math/logic, novices don’t transfer what they learn (e.g., conditional reasoning). • Adult experts vs. novices solving physics problems: • Categories: “Newton’s 2nd law” vs. “Springs” • Child dinosaur experts: • Infer properties of new dinosaurs, logical connectives, more comparison

  4. 2. Yes: Problem-solving can be taught • Bloom & Broder (1950): Good students failed exams at U. Chicago: • Focus on problem-solving strategies: • Remedial student solved problem, • then read transcripts of model answers, • then induced principles: “What should I do if…?” • 10-12 training sessions • Training improved scores (vs. control students) • But did it transfer to other disciplines, etc? • Science strategies (covered in Module 3)

  5. So how do we improve problem solving for all students? • Is lots of specific content info necessary? • Experts make different discrimination; conceptualize problems differently (not distracted by irrelevant info!) • Siegler balance scale: Make children aware of relevant features • Might be induced from lots of experience, but more efficient to point it out! [But: doesn’t always work] • What about metacognition? • Can general skills be induced from expertise in another domain?

  6. Metacognition and high-level problem-solving • Metacognitive practices/standards: • Standards of performance (self-assessment) • Knowing when & how to learn more (Wineburg) • Can these be taught? We don’t know

  7. …continued • Naïve reflection; errors prep for “deep” learning/transfer: • Schwartz & Moore: Compare distribution cases • [2,4,6,8,10] vs. [4,5,6,7,8] • [2,4,6,8,10] vs. [2,2,10,10] • Schwartz & Bransford: Learning about memory • Summarize  lecture vs. • Compare  compare vs. • Compare  lecture • Transfer correct predictions: ≈ 20% vs. 45%!

  8. Creating Intelligent Novices • Critical role of metacognition • Self-tests; self-evaluation • Comprehension monitoring • Learn by discussion (include “expert”) • Finding out more using others’ expertise • Let students become “local” mini-expert • Focus on critical information to encode; Focus on why (role of theories!) • Balance scale • Teaching force vectors: ThinkerTools

  9. Example: ThinkerTools for teaching force vectors • Force vectors errors (just counting!) continue after 1 semester of college physics

  10. ThinkerTools continued... c

  11. Schools for Thought summary • Weak methods in schools • Problem of transfer… • What makes experts experts? • Expose students to experts’ thinking; foci; strategies • Model expert problem solving; make p.s. explicit • Make students aware of relevant info (useof multimedia) • Good error feedback

  12. …continued • Problems: • What’s missing? THEORIES! • “to get ahead, get a theory!” (Karmiloff-Smith): Knowing “why’ vs. knowing “that” • Metacognition • Examples exist of this approach in classrooms, but no unified large scale effort • Teacher expertise in content & metacognition • Resources to pose realistic problems • Time for content, theory, & reflection