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CITATION INDICES

CITATION INDICES

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CITATION INDICES

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  1. CITATION INDICES Philip Purnell March 2010

  2. PART IRESEARCH EVALUATION

  3. HOW DO WE EVALUATE RESEARCH? • Research grants • Number and value • Prestigious awards • Nobel Prizes • Patents • Demonstrating innovative research • Faculty • Number of post-graduate researchers • Citation analysis • Publication and citation counts • Normalised by benchmarks • Peer Evaluation • Expensive, time consuming and subjective

  4. DO WE NEED MORE METRICS? A SIMPLE COUNT IS GOOD ENOUGH (1962)

  5. CHAMPIONS LEAGUE 2009METRICS ARE HERE TO STAY ! 5

  6. A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE CITATION INDEX Concept first developed by Dr Eugene Garfield Science, 1955 The Science Citation Index (1963) SCI print (1960’s) On-line with SciSearch in the 1970’s CD-ROM in the 1980’s Web interface (1997) Web of Science Content enhanced: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) Arts & Humanities Citation Index (AHCI) The Citation Index Primarily developed for purposes of information retrieval Development of electronic media and powerful searching tools have increased its use and popularity for purposes of Research Evaluation

  7. WEB OF SCIENCE JOURNAL SELECTION POLICY Why do we select journals?

  8. THOMSON REUTERSJOURNAL CITATION REPORTS • 40% of the journals: • 80% of the publications • 92% of cited papers • 4% of the journals: • 30% of the publications • 51% of cited papers

  9. COMPARE LIKE WITH LIKEWHAT IS THE VALUE OF A CITATION? • Why do people cite? • Pay homage / give credit to pioneer • Identifying a methodology • Provide background reading • Quotations • Authenticating data, reproducing work etc • Corrections • Criticizing/Disclaiming someone's work/opinions • Citations are an indicator of an article’s impact and usefulness to the research community; they are the mode by which peers acknowledge each other’s research. • The value of a citation is only as important as its source. • Clearly a citation from a prestigious peer review journal has more value than a citation from non-scholarly material. • How can you be sure that the citing source is reputable? “When to Cite”, E. Garfield, Library Quarterly, v66, p449-458, 1996

  10. WEB OF SCIENCE JOURNAL SELECTION POLICY • Approx. 2000 journals evaluated annually • 10-12% accepted • Thomson Reuters editors • Information professionals • Librarians • Experts in the literature of their subject area Journal ‘quality’ Web of Science Journals under evaluation

  11. THOMSON REUTERSJOURNAL SELECTION POLICY • Publishing Standards • Peer review, Editorial conventions • Editorial content • Addition to knowledge in specific subject field • Diversity • International, regional influence of authors, editors, advisors • Citation analysis • Editors and authors’ prior work

  12. Regional Journal Content Expansion 2007-2009Contribution of Each Region to Subject Areas Subject Areas: A&H : Arts &Humanities AB&ES : AgBio & Environmental Sci CM : Clinical Medicine EC&T : Engineering Computing & Technology LS : Life Science PC&ES : PhysChem & Earth Science S&BS : Social & Behavioral Science Regions: AP : Asia Pacific EU : European Union LA : Latin America MA : Middle East/Africa NA : North America

  13. GROWTH IN COVERAGE OF REGIONAL AND CZECH JOURNALS 13

  14. GROWTH IN COVERAGE OF CZECH JOURNALS IN WEB OF SCIENCE *1 title is covered in both SCIE and SSCI **2 titles are covered in both SSCI and A&HCI

  15. GLOBAL RESEARCH REPRESENTATION WEB OF SCIENCE COVERAGE

  16. GOVERNMENTS AND INSTITUTIONS USING TR DATA FOR EVALUATION (INCL.) Czech Republic: Czech Academy of Sciences; Government France: Min. de la Recherche, OST - Paris, CNRS Germany: Max Planck Society, several gov’t labs, DKFZ, MDCUS: National Institutes of Health United Kingdom: King’s College London; HEFCE European Union: EC’s DGXII(Research Directorate) US: NSF: biennial Science & Engineering Indicators report (since 1974) Canada: NSERC, FRSQ (Quebec), Alberta Research Council Australian Academy of Science, gov’t lab CSIRO Japan: Ministry of Education, Ministry of Economy, Trade & Industry People’s Republic of China: Chinese Academy of Science

  17. EVALUATING COUNTRIES

  18. CHANGING NATURE OF CZECH RESEARCH Czech researchers averaged just over 4,000 papers a year in the 70s – 90s. Now over 10,000 papers per year

  19. CHANGING NATURE OF CZECH RESEARCHINTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION Between 1970 and 1999, 14% of Czech papers had at least one international co-author

  20. CHANGING NATURE OF CZECH RESEARCHINTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION In the last decade 2000 – 2010, this figure has risen to 63%

  21. SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PRODUCTIVITY IN CENTRAL EUROPE Thomson Reuters InCites

  22. SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH IMPACT IN CENTRAL EUROPE Thomson Reuters InCites

  23. CZECH RESEARCH BY OUTPUT AND IMPACT Ranking by percentage share of Thomson Reuters (ISI) indexed papers 2004 - 2008

  24. EVALUATING INSTITUTIONS (1)EXTERNAL COMPARISONS

  25. EVALUATING INSTITUTIONS Number of citations to North American scientific papers Source: Thomson Reuters North America University Science Indicators

  26. PUBLICATION AND CITATIONS TOP CZECH ORGANISATIONS

  27. COMPARE YOUR INSTITUTION’S PERFORMANCE AGAINST GLOBAL PEERS Thomson Reuters InCites

  28. INSTITUTIONAL COMPARISONSCOMPARING IMPACT IN BIOLOGY? Cambridge Oxford Stirling Thomson Reuters InCites

  29. INSTITUTIONAL COMPARISONSIN SPECIFIC FIELDS Thomson Reuters InCites

  30. INSTITUTIONAL COMPARISONSBIOLOGY PERFORMANCE Thomson Reuters InCites

  31. EVALUATING INSTITUTIONS (2)INTERNAL ANALYSIS

  32. WHAT IS OUR RESEARCH OUTPUT?

  33. BENCHMARKING YOUR PAPERS AGAINST GLOBAL AVERAGES This article is in the 12.92nd percentile in its field by citations Articles published in ‘Blood’ from 2004 have been cited 34.30 times Hematology articles from this year have been cited 18.83 times

  34. WHAT IS OUR RESEARCH OUTPUT?

  35. WHICH ARE OUR CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE? PhysicalChemistry Computer Science 41% below average 220% above average Thomson Reuters InCites

  36. WITH WHOM DOES OUR FACULTY COLLABORATE?

  37. WHICH OF THOSE COLLABORATIONS ARE THE MOST VALUABLE?

  38. INCITESCITING ARTICLES LISTING Thomson Reuters InCites

  39. CITING PAPERSIN THE FIELD OF PHYSICS Thomson Reuters InCites

  40. EVALUATING INDIVIDUALS

  41. FRANTISEK VYSKOCILPROF. AND D.Sc CHARLES UNIV, PRAGUE • Described: Potassium movement in the brain during migraine • Member: Physiological Society of Cambridge and London • Founding Member: Learned Society of the Czech Republic • Awards: • Prize of the Czech Academy of Sciences • Lifelong Contribution Award of the Czech Academy of Sciences • Purkynje Medal of the Czech Academy of Sciences • First violinist: Quartet of the Herold Chamber Music Club • Author: >60 popular science articles in "Vesmír“

  42. FRANTISEK VYSKOCILWEB OF SCIENCE PUBLICATIONS 247 Publications

  43. FRANTISEK VYSKOCIL GLOBAL INFLUENCE Citations by country Citations: 2.375 Cites per paper: 9,73 H-Index = 30 Citations by journal

  44. WHO ARE OUR MOST PRODUCTIVE AUTHORS? Thomson Reuters InCites

  45. WHO ARE OURMOST INFLUENTIAL RESEARCHERS? Thomson Reuters InCites

  46. WHICH AUTHORS HAVE MOST IMPACT? Thomson Reuters InCites

  47. WHICH AUTHORS’ PAPERS HAVE PERFORMED BEST IN THEIR FIELD? Thomson Reuters InCites

  48. HOW CAN WE COMPARE RESEARCHERS? Author A: 60 papers Author B: 117 papers Thomson Reuters InCites

  49. EVALUATING JOURNALS

  50. 2007 2008 2009 2005 2006 All Previous Years Citations Source paper – published in 2008 Cited reference – published in 2006 or 2007 EFFICIENCYJOURNAL IMPACT FACTOR 2008 Impact Factor