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Deposition Thickness Experiments Using a Vacuum Chamber PowerPoint Presentation
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Deposition Thickness Experiments Using a Vacuum Chamber

Deposition Thickness Experiments Using a Vacuum Chamber

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Deposition Thickness Experiments Using a Vacuum Chamber

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  1. Deposition Thickness Experiments Using a Vacuum Chamber Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory María Rosa Rivera RoqueResearch Supervisors: Shannon Ayers and Victor SperryResearch Advisor: Scot OlivierEducational Home Institution: Sistema Universitario Ana G. Méndez

  2. OVERVIEW • Introduction to nanolaminate • The goal of the experiments • Vacuum chamber • The development of the experiments • Discussion of results • Conclusion • Acknowledgements and references

  3. Introduction Nanolaminate • Has been developed for adaptive optical correction. • This technology is applicable. • Create thin, flexible and lightweight nanolaminate mirrors.

  4. Deposition Thickness Experiments Using a Vacuum Chamber The goal of the experiments were to characterize the deposition rate and thickness profile for three elements.

  5. Vacuum Chamber • Create the deposition environment • Inside it, begins the deposition of a film or coating • Three basic technologies for developing a coating: Ion plating Evaporation Sputtering

  6. Magnetron Sputtering Technology Is a vacuum process used to deposit very thin films on substrates. It is performed by applying a low pressure gas to create a plasma. During the sputtering energized plasma and ions strike the target and cause atoms from that target to be ejected with enough energy to travel and bond with the substrate.

  7. Discussion of Results The profilometer is a thin film thickness measuring tool. It is used to measure the thickness of the deposition at a specific location.

  8. Discussion of Results Thickness Curve for Carbon Target Thickness Curve for Copper Target Thickness in Angstroms Thickness in Angstroms Distance in cm from centerline of target Distance in cm from centerline of target Thickness Curve for Zirconium Target Thickness in Angstroms ∫ x2 dx Distance in cm from centerline of target

  9. Discussion of Results TARGET 60’’ DIAMETER PLATE 45/8’’ WAFERS Higher angles for sputtering - the deposition will be spread less on the wafers.

  10. Conclusions • These experiments are important to know how thick the nanolaminate mirror is going to be. • With these thickness profiles and rates we can also calculate for future experiments: the rotation (revolution per minute) linear translation (cm per minute)

  11. Acknowledgements • This project is supported by the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by the University of California at Santa Cruz under cooperative agreement No. AST – 9876783. • REU by the HACU Hispanic Scientist Development Program. • Sperry, Victor – Research Supervisor • Ayers, Shannon – Research Supervisor

  12. References • http://www.angstromsciences.com • http://www.llnl.gov