some seismological notes on the may 12 2008 sichuan china earthquake n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Some Seismological Notes on the May 12, 2008 Sichuan, China Earthquake PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Some Seismological Notes on the May 12, 2008 Sichuan, China Earthquake

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 10

Some Seismological Notes on the May 12, 2008 Sichuan, China Earthquake - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 142 Views
  • Uploaded on

Some Seismological Notes on the May 12, 2008 Sichuan, China Earthquake. Steve Gao & Kelly Liu sgao@mst.edu , liukh@mst.edu Associate Professors of Geophysics Missouri University of Science and Technology Rolla, MO 65401 http://www.mst.edu/~sgao. Focal parameters of the quake.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Some Seismological Notes on the May 12, 2008 Sichuan, China Earthquake


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Some Seismological Notes on the May 12, 2008 Sichuan, China Earthquake Steve Gao & Kelly Liu sgao@mst.edu, liukh@mst.edu Associate Professors of Geophysics Missouri University of Science and Technology Rolla, MO 65401 http://www.mst.edu/~sgao

    2. Focal parameters of the quake • Magnitude 7.9 (based on USGS determination) • Time: May 12, 2008 at 14:28:00 local time • Location 31.021N, 103.367E • Focal depth 10 km • Location: 80 km WNW of Chengdu, 140 km WSW of Mianyang, 345 km WNW of Chongqing, and 1545 km SW of Beijing • Instrumental Intensity at the epicenter: ~9 • Instrumental Intensity at Chengdu: 6-7 • Current (5/13 10:00 US Central Time) Death Toll: ~12,000

    3. To view real-time earthquake activity, go to http://www.iris.edu/seismon

    4. The force that produced the earthquake was originated from the northward movement of India relative to Tibet. http://picasaweb.google.com/mail2vijayreddy/WorldAtlas/photo#5176003781132706594

    5. Many earthquakes in China were caused by the continental collision between India and Tibet Scanned from “Lithospheric Dynamics Atlas of China”

    6. China’s earthquake potential (redder = more dangerous) http://www.air-worldwide.com/_public/NewsData/000994/China_Risk_Map.jpg

    7. The May 12, 2008 earthquake (hand-drawn black star) occurred along the LongMenShan fault, which was responsible for magnitude ~6 quakes over the past ~400 years.A more active fault at the north of the May 12 quake in the SongPan area produced stronger quakes including the 7.2 in 1976 and 7.5 in 1933 Scanned from “Lithospheric Dynamics Atlas of China”

    8. The LongMenShan fault is mostly a thrust fault produced by the eastward “escape” of the eastern Tibetan Plateau http://www.cacegypt.org/Sinai/homework/GREG/pages/Q2_04/Fault_Types.html

    9. Over the past 30 hours a total of about 40 magnitude >= 3.5 quakes have occurred. Most of the aftershocks are on the NE part of the mainshock.The largest aftershock is a 6.0 occurred 15 minutes after the mainshock

    10. Notes about earthquake prediction • For a successful prediction, three critical parameters must be predicted: • 1). Location (the error must be within a few hundred km) • 2). Time (error within a week or so) • 3). Magnitude (the error within one magnitude unit – a difference in one magnitude unit corresponds to a 32-fold difference in energy release!) • Potential for magnitude > 6.5 aftershocks is high • At the present time, no one on earth can predict earthquakes • Some claimed “precursors” such as strange behaviors of animals are not consistently observed before most of the large quakes. The problem is the same for more scientific precursors such as ground tilt, water chemistry changes, changes in earth’s gravity and magnetic fields, and changes in atmospheric features (“earthquake clouds”)