writing a formal report n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Writing a FORMAL REPORT PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Writing a FORMAL REPORT

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 22

Writing a FORMAL REPORT - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 108 Views
  • Uploaded on

Writing a FORMAL REPORT . CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 4903. AMY BINGHAM CLEAR Writing Specialist. Office Hours: Wednesdays 10AM – 12 PM Thursdays 2 PM – 4 PM *Or By Appointment Call Office: 801-581-8715 Call or Text Cell: 801-834-2868 E-mail: amylinb@gmail.com.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Writing a FORMAL REPORT' - zaria


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
writing a formal report

Writing a FORMAL REPORT

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 4903

amy bingham clear writing specialist
AMY BINGHAMCLEAR Writing Specialist

Office Hours: Wednesdays 10AM – 12 PM

Thursdays 2 PM – 4 PM

*Or By Appointment

Call Office: 801-581-8715

Call or Text Cell: 801-834-2868

E-mail: amylinb@gmail.com

how you will use your writing skills
How you will use your writing skills:
  • GRE
  • Resumes/Cover Letters
  • Emails
  • Workplace Business
does it have to be either or
Does it have to be either/or?

Creative Mind

Scientific Mind

why being organized helps
Why Being Organized Helps
  • Promote readability
  • Reader will scan, sometimes give up
  • First Impressions
introduction
INTRODUCTION

Here at the institute for computer research, me and my colleagues have created the SUPERGP system and have applied it to several toy problems. We had previously fumbled with earlier versions of SUPERGPSYSTEM for a while. This system allows the programmer to easily try lots of parameters, and problems, but incorporates a special constraint system for parameter settings and LISP S-expression parenthesis counting.

The search space of GP is large and many things we are thinking about putting into the supergpsystem will make this space much more colorful.

introduction1
INTRODUCTION

Here at the institute for computer research, me and my colleagues have created the SUPERGP system and have applied it to several toy problems. We had previously fumbled with earlier versions of SUPERGPSYSTEM for a while. This system allows the programmer to easily try lots of parameters, and problems, but incorporates a special constraint system for parameter settings and LISP S-expression parenthesis counting.

The search space of GP is large and many things we are thinking about putting into the supergpsystem will make this space much more colorful.

purpose of introduction
Indicate the background of the project and the reasons for undertaking it.

Introduce the problem and outline the solution.

A clear statement of why the problem is interesting. (Why do we care?)

Your reader should have a clear understanding about what you’re going to talk about for the rest of the report.

Make sure your reader knows what the paper is about, not just how important your general area of research is.

Purpose of Introduction
good introductions
GOOD INTRODUCTIONS
  • 1. Pinpoint the problem you’re addressing
  • 2. Give an overview of your approach and/or contributions
  • 3. Set up the readers expectations for the rest of the paper. (Provide Preview.)
  • 4. Orient the person reading your report to the subject using a concise review of relevant literature.
        • Be sure the literature is specifically relevant to the content of your paper.
        • Cite your sources properly!
bad introductions
BAD INTRODUCTIONS
  • Avoid stock and cliché phrases
      • “Recent advances in XYZ. . .”
      • “Through the growth of the Internet. . .”
      • “Throughout the history of time. . .”
slide13

Repeat information found in other parts of your report verbatim.

  • Do not make it long or long-winded.
organization of your introduction
Organization of Your Introduction
  • Begin with a main idea. The rest of the paragraph will explain and support this idea.
  • Everything in the paragraph should have a reason for being there.
  • Should be easy to follow and understand.
  • Moved on to another idea? START A NEW PARAGRAPH!
slide15

According to de Nevers (1970), the orifice meter is used widely as a device for measuring the flow rate of a fluid in a pipeline. Compared with other head meters, such as the venturi meter and the nozzle, the orifice meter is less expensive to fabricate and install; however, the permanent energy loss is relatively high. According to Sakiadis (1984), the orifice plate can have a square edged or sharp-edged hole. For measurement of the pressure drop across the orifice, the pressure taps can be at corner, radius, pipe, flange, or vena contracta locations. The direction of flow through the orifice can be horizontal, vertical, or inclined. The measured pressure drop across the orifice is related to the flow rate by means of an orifice coefficient, which accounts for friction, as defined in the next section of this report. Extensive research on and development of orifice meters has resulted in a standard orifice-meter design and standard correlations for the orifice coefficient, as reported in a booklet by the ASME Research Committee on Fluid Meters (1971). By proper application of the ASME standards, flow rates can be determined reproducibly to within 1 to 2 percent from measurements of orifice-meter pressure drop. Nevertheless, it is common practice to calibrate an orifice meter before it is actually used in research, development, or production. The purpose of this project was to calibrate a sharp-edged orifice meter provided with corner taps for water flow in a Schedule 40 one-inch steel pipe and to compare the measuredorifice coefficients with literature values. A calibrated rotameterwas used to measure the actual water flow rate, which was varied over more than a three-fold range.

point of view
POINT OF VIEW

third person

n.

1. The grammatical category of forms that designate a person or thing other than the speaker or the one spoken to.

first′ per′son

n.

1. the grammatical person used by a speaker in statements referring to himself or herself or to a group including himself or herself.

2. a pronoun or verb form in the first person, as I, we, or am, or a set of such forms.

active vs passive
Active vs. Passive

Noun1.active voice - the voice used to indicate that the grammatical subject of the verb is performing the action or causing the happening denoted by the verb

Noun1.passive voice - the voice used to indicate that the grammatical subject of the verb is the recipient (not the source) of the action denoted by the verb

The fact that three underground storage tanks had been leaking unleaded gasoline into the soil was revealed in the study.

The study revealed that three underground storage tanks had leaked unleaded gasoline into the soil.

present vs past tense
Present vs. Past Tense

pres·ent tense  (prznt)

n.

The verb tense expressing action in the present time, as in She writes; she is writing.

past tense

n.

A verb tense used to express an action or a condition that occurred in or during the past. For example, in While she was sewing, he read aloud, was sewing and read are in the past tense.

Use Past Tense for Describing Procedures

Use Present Tense for Theory and Known Facts

theory section
Theory Section
  • In a few pages, give the reader theoretical and experimental background necessary to understand the science and engineering involved.
  • Provide theoretical background and assumptions for the equations and correlations used to analyze the data.
  • Number all equations
  • Give your references to pertinent papers or books.
  • Avoid extraneous theory, but focus on theory pertaining to YOUR experiment and explain it clearly.
  • Assume the reader is technologically proficient.

REVIEW SAMPLE INTRO/THEORY TOGETHER

due beginning of next class
DUE BEGINNING OF NEXT CLASS

1. What is a team?

2. What should a team do?

3. What type of teamwork experience do you want in this class?

Write your answers in clear, concise sentences.

If you want to use bullet-points, that is fine, but the points have to be complete sentences. For example, unacceptable answers to question 1 would be "a group" or "a group of people”.