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Integrated Food Waste Management for Climate Change Mitigation in Developing Asian Countries - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Integrated Waste Management and Resource Efficiency . Integrated Food Waste Management for Climate Change Mitigation in Developing Asian Countries. Janya SANG-ARUN, Researcher Magnus BENGTSSON, Senior Policy Researcher Taib SHAZWIN, Intern. Introduction to IGES.

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slide1

Integrated Waste Management and Resource Efficiency

Integrated Food Waste Management for Climate Change Mitigation in Developing Asian Countries

Janya SANG-ARUN, Researcher

Magnus BENGTSSON, Senior Policy Researcher

Taib SHAZWIN, Intern

introduction to iges
Introduction to IGES
  • IGES is an NPO based in Japan (5 branch offices)
  • Working on policy-research and providing services and facilitating policy development to Ministries in Japan (esp. Ministry of Environment) and Governments in Asia and the Pacific.
  • 7 Divisions: Waste and Resources Management, Natural Resource Management (Forest, Fresh Water, Biodiversity), Climate Policy, Climate Market Mechanism, Environmental Education, Economic Analysis, and Program Management Office.
  • Download publications: www.iges.or.jp
presentation outline
Presentation outline
  • Potential GHG emissions and reductions from food waste
  • Food waste management hierarchy based on 3Rs
  • Example of food waste management in Cambodia, Thailand and India
  • Conclusion
waste composition in developing asia countries
Waste composition in developing Asia countries

*Compile from various sources

** toxic link, 2002

preferable food waste management technology
Preferable food waste management technology
  • Low GHG emissions
  • Efficient resource recovery
  • Low energy input
  • Low monetary investment
  • Low environmental impact
  • Simple and easy to handle
urban composting in phnom penh cambodia
Urban Composting in Phnom Penh, Cambodia
  • Waste generation is 1,200 ton/day
  • 30 ton/day of waste from food market is composting by a NGO (COMPED)
slide10

Compost price is 75 USD/ton of compost

  • GHG emissions reduction is around 1.7 tCO2eq/day
urban composting in bangkok thailand
Urban Composting in Bangkok, Thailand
  • Waste generation : 8,500 tons/day
  • Composting: 1,000 tons/day of waste
  • Compost price: 63 USD/ton
  • GHG emissions reduction: 659 tCO2eq/day
anaerobic digestion in rayong thailand
Anaerobic digestion in Rayong, Thailand
  • Waste generation: 60 tons/day
  • Capacity of the plant: 60 tons/day
  • Actual operation: 25-30 tons/day
  • Use of biogas: Generating electricity  sell to national grid
  • GHG emissions reduction: 26 tCO2eq/day
anaerobic digestion in kerala india
Anaerobic digestion in Kerala, India
  • Initiated by BIOTECH India (Trivandrum, Kochi, etc)
  • 35% of investment cost is subsidized
  • 16,000 household with waste input of 3 kg/day
  • 220 community’s digesters
  • 25 schools with capacity of 50 kg of waste per day
  • 45 plants with capacity of 250 kg of waste per day is generating electricity from biogas produced
  • 30-50% saving LPG use for cooking
  • Short term economic return
biogas plant at a school in trivandrum
Biogas plant at a school in Trivandrum
  • Plant capacity: 100 kgs of waste input
  • Current waste input: 25-30 kgs + 20 l kitchen wastewater
  • Energy saving: 35%
  • Effluent: use as liquid fertilizer in school
  • Plan to collect food waste from other organization
biogas plant at ywca dormitory in trivandrum
Biogas plant at YWCA (dormitory) in Trivandrum
  • Capacity: 25 kgs of waste input
  • Waste input: 25 kgs waste + 75 kitchen wastewater
  • Effluent: discharge to wastewater canal
  • Energy saving: not yet obvious
biogas plant at a fish market in trivandrum
Biogas plant at a fish market in Trivandrum
  • Capacity: 250 kgs waste input/day
  • Use of biogas: Generating electricity (5kW) for lighting the market and community road
household biogas project in trivandrum
Household biogas project in Trivandrum
  • Waste input 3 kg/day
  • Size: 1 m3
  • Biogas use: cooking
  • Effluent: use for gardening
  • Saving 50% of LPG for cooking
mechanical biological pre treatment mbt
Mechanical Biological Pre-Treatment (MBT)
  • Implement in Phitsanulok, Thailand since 1999
  • Could reduce GHG emissions and extend lifetime of landfill
  • Plastic waste is segregated before dumping into landfill
conclusion
Conclusion
  • Food waste contributes large amount of GHG emissions from the waste sector of developing Asian countries.
  • The government should promote use of food waste as a resource (e.g. animal feed, biogas, and composting) in household or community scale.
  • To increase efficiency of food waste utilization, food waste separation at source is required.
  • Not all of food waste can be separated, MBT should be applied for mixed waste.
iges future work on food waste and climate change
IGES future work on food waste and climate change
  • Supporting local governments by developing an implementation guideline and decision tool for promoting use of organic waste in Laos, Cambodia and Thailand.
  • Providing training workshop to local governments in Laos, Cambodia and Thailand.
  • Study on multiple benefits of organic waste management.
  • Biomass town for resource efficiency and climate change mitigation in developing Asian countries.
acknowledgement
Acknowledgement
  • Financial supporters:
  • Ministry of Environment, Japan (MOEJ)
  • Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research (APN)
  • CCDC2010 Organizers