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Employ entrepreneurial discovery strategies to generate feasible ideas for business ventures/products. 2.06. Identify purposes of idea-generating methods/techniques. Purposes. Creative problem solving Create a large pool of ideas Generate, develop, and communicate new ideas

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slide1

Employ entrepreneurial discovery strategies to generate feasible ideas for business ventures/products.

2.06

purposes
Purposes
  • Creative problem solving
  • Create a large pool of ideas
  • Generate, develop, and communicate new ideas
  • Listen to all ideas
  • Use different thinking styles
  • Select those that are genuinely worth pursuing
advantages
Advantages
  • More money
  • Faster promotion
  • Increased creativity
  • Better society
  • More pleasant working environment

Infinite Innovations. (1997-2008). Benefits of brainstorming and techniques for problem solving. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.brainstorming.co.uk/tutorials/benefitsofbrainstorming.html

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  • Better employee relations
  • A more responsive company
  • Taking advantages of gaps in the market
  • Creating new markets
  • New products and services

Infinite Innovations. (1997-2008). Benefits of brainstorming and techniques for problem solving. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.brainstorming.co.uk/tutorials/benefitsofbrainstorming.html

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  • Better products and services
  • Better management
  • Less conflicts and arguments
  • Improvements in productivity and reliability

Infinite Innovations. (1997-2008). Benefits of brainstorming and techniques for problem solving. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.brainstorming.co.uk/tutorials/benefitsofbrainstorming.html

disadvantages
Disadvantages
  • Brainstorms are often run with poor framing or context
  • Facilitation of a brainstorm requires different skills than managing other meetings
  • Too few people are involved in ideation
  • The teams don't believe the ideas will we acted on
  • There's poor communication throughout

Phillips, J. (2006, August 7). What’s wrong with idea generation. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://innovateonpurpose.blogspot.com/2006/08/whats-wrong-with-idea-generation.html

basic definition
Basic Definition
  • A facilitator is an individual who's job is to help to manage a process of information exchange. While an expert's role is to offer advice, particularly about the content of a discussion, the facilitator's role is to help with HOW the discussion is proceeding.
  • In short, the facilitator's responsibility is to address the journey, rather than the destination.

Bacal, R. (n.d.). The role of the facilitator: Understanding what facilitators really do. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://work911.com/articles/facil.htm

competencies the facilitator
CompetenciesThe Facilitator:
  • distinguishes process from content
  • manages the client relationship and prepares thoroughly
  • uses time and space intentionally
  • is skilled in evoking participation and creativity
  • practiced in honoring the group and affirming its wisdom
  • capable of maintaining objectivity

Bacal, R. (n.d.). The role of the facilitator: Understanding what facilitators really do. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://work911.com/articles/facil.htm

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  • skilled in reading the underlying dynamics of the group
  • releases blocks to the process
  • adapts to the changing situation
  • assumes (or shares) responsibility for the group journey
  • demonstrates professionalism, self-confidence and authenticity
  • maintains personal integrity

Bacal, R. (n.d.). The role of the facilitator: Understanding what facilitators really do. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://work911.com/articles/facil.htm

characteristics the facilitator commits to a style of
CharacteristicsThe Facilitator Commits to a Style of:
  • asking rather than telling
  • paying personal compliments
  • willing to spend time in building relationships rather than always being task-oriented
  • initiating conversation rather than waiting for someone else to
  • asking for other's opinions rather than always having to offer their own
  • negotiating rather than dictating decision-making

Bacal, R. (n.d.). The role of the facilitator: Understanding what facilitators really do. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://work911.com/articles/facil.htm

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  • listening without interrupting
  • emoting but able to be restrained when the situation requires it
  • drawing energy from outside themselves rather than from within
  • basing decisions upon intuitions rather than having to have facts
  • has sufficient self-confidence that they can look someone in the eye when talking to them
  • more persuasive than sequential

Bacal, R. (n.d.). The role of the facilitator: Understanding what facilitators really do. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://work911.com/articles/facil.htm

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  • more enthusiastic than systematic
  • more outgoing than serious
  • more like a counselor than a sergeant
  • more like a coach than a scientist
  • is naturally curious about people, things and life in general
  • can keep the big picture in mind while working on the nitty-gritty

Bacal, R. (n.d.). The role of the facilitator: Understanding what facilitators really do. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://work911.com/articles/facil.htm

slide17
  • A great question should be well-timed and carefully formed to test and pinpoint problem areas.
  • A great question will start the exploration process and facilitate further investigation and study of the problem.
  • Great questions will uncover facts.
  • Use questioning words such as "What, What if, Where, Why, When, and How", to develop quality questions.
  • Ask BOTH open-ended and closed-ended questions.

http://www.innovationtools.com/Articles/EnterpriseDetails.asp?a=77

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  • Clarifying questions – those that help ensure a full understanding of topics; essential for all team members to be working with common knowledge for planning problem solving.
  • Exploratory questions – emphasize possibilities that have not yet been discussed; enhance teams ability to find creative solutions.
  • Why questions – these examine the underlying rationale for actions, processes, or circumstances; useful for problem solving, planning and several other purposes.

http://www.innovationtools.com/Articles/EnterpriseDetails.asp?a=77

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Samples of questions that are used by facilitators appear outside the circle.

http://www.unc.edu/~gdhughes/ARTICLES.HTM

how to generate new product ideas
How to Generate New Product Ideas
  • Observe what's around you and what's been done before. Think of the products you use every day, whether in your business or at home. What can be improved? In 1921 a man named Earle Dickinson noticed that his wife was always cutting her fingers while preparing food. Back then bandages were made of a separate piece of gauze and a piece of adhesive that had to be individually measured and shaped. Dickinson decided to stick a square of gauze to the center of the adhesive and wrap the entire piece around his wife's fingers, while encasing the bandage in crinoline for cleanliness. In that moment, Dickinson invented what's now known as the Band-Aid. If there is a product that you find to be essential to your day, analyze its basic components. What does the product lack? By filling in these blanks, you've generated new product ideas.

Brooks, A. (1999-2011). How to generate product ideas. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.ehow.com/how_4811754_generate-new-product-ideas.html

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Think creatively about pre-existing products. For example, combining two pre-existing products can produce a wealth of new product ideas. Consider a paper-clip and a stapler. A stapler works by a feeding mechanism that pushes the staples forward and another mechanism that uses pressure to press the staplers through paper. One recently patented device takes the mechanics of a stapler and applies it to paper clips, to make an automatic paper-clip dispenser. These product ideas don't have to be limited to the business and office environment. Combining genres (especially those that seem inimical to each other) is a great way to develop new product ideas. For example, a popular movie released in 2008 could be described as 'Immediate Family' and 'Napoleon Dynamite'. That finished product is the movie 'Juno', about a quirky pregnant teenager.

Brooks, A. (1999-2011). How to generate product ideas. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.ehow.com/how_4811754_generate-new-product-ideas.html

slide23

Ask for product ideas from customers. If you're an already established business you know that maintaining correspondence with customers is a great business practice. It makes your customers feel valued and increases the chances of them using your service or product again. However, many businesses give customers the chance to communicate with passive statements like, 'Tell us how we're doing' or 'Send comments or concerns here'. Instead, be specific about the input you want. Invite customers to give you ideas about what kind of products they would like you to offer, or improvements they feel can be made to existing products. Again, this reinforces the customer's sense of importance while giving your business ideas for new products.

Brooks, A. (1999-2011). How to generate product ideas. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.ehow.com/how_4811754_generate-new-product-ideas.html

performance activity
Performance Activity
  • Using the methods/techniques selected in an earlier activity, generate as many different venture/product ideas as possible for the opportunity that you assessed and selected previously. Share your ideas with two or three classmates, add to your list as necessary, and insert your list of venture/product ideas into your VIP portfolio.