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Civil GNSS Security Splinter Meeting PowerPoint Presentation
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Civil GNSS Security Splinter Meeting

Civil GNSS Security Splinter Meeting

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Civil GNSS Security Splinter Meeting

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  1. Civil GNSS Security Splinter Meeting Portland, Oregon | September 23, 2010

  2. Opening Remarks (as prepared, Todd Humphreys, UT Austin) Good morning, and welcome to an informal meeting on civil GNSS security. We’ve convened in this room many of the world’s leading experts on the issues of civil GNSS jamming and spoofing. Why? What is the point? The idea for this meeting came originally from my colleague PravirChawdhry of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre. Pravir is director of the Security Technology Assessment Unit within the EC’s Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen, which has many of the same responsibilities as our Department of Homeland security, although, as regards location and timing security, engages these responsibilities with somewhat greater vigor. Pravir has been tasked with finding concrete strategies for combating GPS jamming and spoofing. The EC has recently caught fishing vessel skippers attempting to subvert their GPS-based vessel monitoring systems in order to fish undetected in forbidden waters. These initial attempts, while crude, have been enough to alarm the EC. Pravir wanted to convene a meeting of the best minds on civil GNSS security from both sides of the Atlantic to discuss paths forward. Ultimately, Pravir was unable to attend this meeting. In addition, there are those here in the US who feel that GNSS spoofing and jamming should not be discussed in the open, never mind that nearly a decade has passed since the US DOT’s Volpe report raised the alarm about civil GPS jamming and spoofing, yet today’s civil GNSS systems are as vulnerable as ever. But times are changing. The fact that a terrorist or criminal could knock out GPS all across Portland with a device purchased for $250 on the Internet has caught people’s attention. Brad Parkinson and Phillip Ward made civil GNSS jamming a focus of their plenary talks opening the ION conference on Tuesday evening. Here, we’ll continue that discussion and offer strategies for the best ways forward. Terry McGurn will lead off the discussion. Terry has been a champion of these issues for many years.