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SHAKESPEARE AND LANGUAGE. 1 December 2010: Do Now. END RHYME INTERNAL RHYME NEAR/SLANT RHYME ONOMATOPOEIA ALLITERATION. CONSONANCE ASSONANCE METAPHOR SIMILE HYPERBOLE. Which of the following literary terms and poetic conventions can you identify?. END RHYME.

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1 december 2010 do now
1 December 2010: Do Now
  • END RHYME
  • INTERNAL RHYME
  • NEAR/SLANT RHYME
  • ONOMATOPOEIA
  • ALLITERATION
  • CONSONANCE
  • ASSONANCE
  • METAPHOR
  • SIMILE
  • HYPERBOLE
  • Which of the following literary terms and poetic conventions can you identify?
end rhyme
END RHYME
  • A word at the end of one line rhymes with a word at the end of another line
  • I know you’re tired and just had lunch
  • But if you’re not awake in class
  • There’s a very good chance
  • You will not pass.
internal rhyme
INTERNAL RHYME
  • A word inside a line rhymes with another word on the same line.
  • Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary.
  • From “The Raven”
  • by Edgar Allan Poe
near slant rhyme
NEAR/SLANT RHYME
  • a.k.a imperfect rhyme, close rhyme, slant rhyme
  • The words share EITHER the same vowel or consonant sound BUT NOT BOTH
  • ROSE
  • LOSE
  • Different vowel sounds (long “o” and “oo” sound)
  • Share the same consonant sound
onomatopoeia
ONOMATOPOEIA
  • Words that imitate the sound they are naming
  • BUZZ
  • ZAP

POP!

CRACK

alliteration
ALLITERATION
  • Consonant sounds repeated at the beginnings of words
  • If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers, how many pickled peppers did Peter Piper pick?
consonance
CONSONANCE
  • Similar to alliteration EXCEPT . . .
  • The repeated consonant sounds can be anywhere in the words
  • “silken,sad, uncertain, rustling . . “
assonance
ASSONANCE
  • Repeated VOWEL sounds in a line or lines of poetry.
  • (Often creates near rhyme.)
  • Lake Fate Base Fade
  • (All share the long “a” sound.)
assonance cont
ASSONANCE cont.

Examples of ASSONANCE:

“Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep.”

- William Shakespeare

2 december 2010 do now
2 December 2010: DO NOW
  • Does the type of language people use change based on…
    • Location?
    • Age?
    • Social situations?
    • Socio-economic status?
    • Can you think of examples?
  • WHY or WHY NOT?
slide12

The language used by Shakespeare in his plays is in one of three forms:

    • BLANK VERSE
    • RHYMED VERSE
    • PROSE
prose
PROSE
  • written or spoken language in its ordinary form, without metrical structure
blank verse unrhymed iambic pentameter
BLANK VERSE = unrhymed iambic pentameter
  • Meter:  a recognizable rhythm in a line of verse consisting of a pattern of regularly recurring stressed and unstressed syllables. 
  • Iamb: a particular type of metric "foot" consisting of two syllable
    • an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable ("da DUM”)
    • An unstressed syllable is conventionally represented by a curved line resembling a smile (a U is as close as I can get here).  A stressed syllable is conventionally represented by a / . 
      • Thus, an iamb is conventionally represented U / . 
meter
METER
  • A pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables.
  • Meter occurs when the stressed and unstressed syllables of the words in a poem are arranged in a repeating pattern.
  • When poets write in meter, they count out the number of stressed (strong) syllables and unstressed (weak) syllables for each line. Then they repeat the pattern throughout the poem.
slide16

Foot/feet:a metric "foot" refers to the combination of a strong stress and the associated weak stress (or stresses) that make up the recurrent metric unit of a line of verse.

  • FOOT - unit of meter.
  • A foot can have two or three syllables.
  • Usually consists of one stressed and one or more unstressed syllables.
  • TYPES OF FEET

The types of feet are determined by the arrangement of stressed and unstressed syllables.

Iambic - unstressed, stressed

Cowards die many times before their deaths

slide17

Kinds of Metrical Lines

  • monometer = one foot on a line
  • dimeter = two feet on a line
  • trimeter = three feet on a line
  • tetrameter = four feet on a line
  • Pentameter = five feet on a line=10 syllables
  • hexameter = six feet on a line
  • Heptameter = seven feet on a line
  • octometer = eight feet on a line

The valiant never taste of death but once.

blank verse poetry
BLANK VERSE POETRY
  • Written in lines of iambic pentameter, but does NOT use end rhyme.

from Julius Ceasar

Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,

It seems to me most strange that men should fear;

Seeing that death, a necessary end,

shakespearian drama
Shakespearian Drama

Example of Blank Verse

U / U / U / U / U /

But soft.|What light| through yon|der win|dow breaks?

It is the east, and Juliet the sun!

for hw
For HW:
  • Write a minimum ten line poem in blank verse.
  • The first line of the poem should be broken down to show meter and feet.
      • This is due Monday, December 6th